Welcome to Funday Urdu Forum

Guest Image

Welcome to Funday Urdu Forum, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of Funday Urdu Forum by signing in or creating an account via default Sign up page or social links such as: Facebook, Twitter or Google.

  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.
  • Upload or Download IPS Community files such as:  Applications, Plugins etc.
  • Upload or Download your Favorite Books, Novels in PDF format. 

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'afghan'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Help Support
    • Announcement And Help
    • Funday Chatroom
  • Poetry
    • Shair-o-Shaa'eri
    • Famous Poet
  • Islam - اسلام
    • QURAN O TARJUMA قرآن و ترجمہ
    • AHADEES MUBARIK آحدیث مبارک
    • Ramazan ul Mubarik - رمضان المبارک
    • Deen O Duniya - دین و دنیا
  • Other Forums
    • Chitchat and Greetings
    • Urdu Adab
    • Entertainment
    • Common Rooms
  • Music, Movies, and Dramas
    • Movies Song And Tv.Series
  • Science, Arts & Culture
    • Education, Science & Technology
  • IPS Community Suite
    • IPS Community Suite 4.1
    • IPS Download
    • IPS Community Help/Support And Tutorials

Blogs

  • Ishq_janoon_Dewanagi
  • Uzee khan
  • Beauty of Words
  • Tareekhi Waqaiyaat
  • Geo News Blog
  • The Pakistan Tourism
  • My BawaRchi_KhaNa
  • Mukaam.e.Moahhabt
  • FDF Members Poetry
  • Sadqy Tmhary
  • FDF Online News
  • Pakistan
  • Dua's Kitchen
  • Raqs e Bismil

Categories

  • Books
    • Urdu Novels
    • Islamic
    • General Books
  • IPS Community Suite 4
    • Applications
    • Plugins
    • Themes
    • Language Packs
    • IPS Extras
  • IPS Community Suite 3.4
    • Applications
    • Hooks/BBCodes
    • Themes/Skins
    • Language Packs
    • Miscellaneous XML Files
  • XenForo
    • Add-ons
    • Styles
    • Language Packs
    • Miscellaneous XML Files
  • Web Scripts
  • PC Softwares

Categories

  • Articles

Categories

  • Records

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Pakistan Holidays

Genres

  • English
  • New Movie Songs
  • Old Movies Songs
  • Single Track
  • Classic
  • Ghazal
  • Pakistani
  • Indian Pop & Remix
  • Romantic
  • Punjabi
  • Qawalli
  • Patriotic
  • Islam

Categories

  • Islam
  • Online Movies
    • English
    • Indian
    • Punjabi
    • Hindi Dubbed
    • Animated - Cartoon
    • Other Movies
    • Pakistani Movies
  • Video Songs
    • Coke Studio
  • Mix Videos
  • Online Live Channels
    • Pakistani Channels
    • Indian Channels
    • Sports Channels
    • English Channels
  • Pakistani Drama Series
    • Zara Yaad ker
    • Besharam (ARY TV series)
  • English Series
    • Quantico Season 1
    • SuperGirl Season 1
    • The Magicians
    • The Shannara Chronicles
    • Game of Thrones

Found 79 results

  1. NEW YORK: Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said on Wednesday that US President Donald Trump´s strategy to win the war in Afghanistan will work where his predecessor´s failed because the Afghan army is stronger and Trump wants a regional approach. Ghani also said that former President Barack Obama "did not have a partner in Afghanistan," implicitly criticising former Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who frequently disdained US policy and the US-led international military force. "President Trump is not just an individual (but) a team of partners in Afghanistan," Ghani told the Asia Society in New York, where he is attending the UN General Assembly. "The Trump administration´s strategy has the uniqueness of immense consultations with us." At the same time, Ghani said, Obama´s decision to maintain some US forces in Afghanistan "ensured our survival" despite advances by Taliban insurgents. US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Monday that more than 3,000 additional US troops are being deployed to Afghanistan under the new strategy announced last month. The number of US forces would rise to more than 14,000, compared to a high of more than 100,000 under Obama. While providing few details, Trump pledged stepped-up operations against the Taliban and an open-ended commitment of US military advisers, trainers and counter-terrorism units. He also vowed to take a tougher line to end what US officials say is Pakistan providing refuge and other support to the Taliban and other extremist groups. Pakistan denies the charge. Asked how Trump´s strategy differs from Obama's, Ghani said Trump´s plan takes "a regional approach" to security and a harder line with Pakistan while providing a new opening for peace talks. "The message to Pakistan to engage and become a responsible stakeholder in the region and in the fight against terrorism has never been clearer," Ghani said. "What I am offering the Pakistan government, the Pakistan security apparatus, is the invitation to a comprehensive dialogue." "If Pakistan does not take this opportunity, I think they will pay a high price," he said, without elaborating. "Afghans are determined to fight," he said. "No one should mistake our will to defend our country.? "Not only is the army better trained and profiting from a new generation of soldiers, but it gained experience because the massive cuts in the US-led international force under Obama forced Afghans to assume a bigger role in the fighting, Ghani said. When it was pointed out that the Taliban have expanded their control of territory, Ghani blamed the inability of the police to hold ground. The next phase of reforming Afghanistan´s security forces will focus on the police, he said. As for when the 16-year-long war would end, Ghani said, "I think we are not talking a decade or longer. We are talking some limited years.?
  2. Afghanistan President Mohammad Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai addresses the 72nd United Nations General Assembly at UN Headquarters in New York, US, September 19, 2017/REUTERS Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said on Wednesday that US President Donald Trump?s strategy to win the war in Afghanistan will work where his predecessor?s failed because the Afghan army is stronger and Trump wants a regional approach and a harder line with Pakistan. Ghani also said that former President Barack Obama ?did not have a partner in Afghanistan,? implicitly criticizing former Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who frequently disdained US policy and the US-led international military force. ?President Trump is not just an individual (but) a team of partners in Afghanistan,? Ghani told the Asia Society in New York, where he is attending the UN General Assembly. ?The Trump administration?s strategy has the uniqueness of immense consultations with us.? At the same time, Ghani said, Obama?s decision to maintain some US forces in Afghanistan ?ensured our survival? despite advances by Taliban insurgents. US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Monday that more than 3,000 additional US troops are being deployed to Afghanistan under the new strategy announced last month. The number of US forces would rise to more than 14,000, compared to a high of more than 100,000 under Obama. While providing few details, Trump pledged stepped-up operations against the Taliban and an open-ended commitment of US military advisers, trainers and counter-terrorism units. He also vowed to take a tougher line to end what US officials say is Pakistan providing refuge and other support to the Taliban and other extremist groups. Pakistan denies the charge. Asked how Trump?s strategy differs from Obama?s, Ghani said Trump?s plan takes ?a regional approach? to security and a harder line with Pakistan while providing a new opening for peace talks. ?The message to Pakistan to engage and become a responsible stakeholder in the region and in the fight against terrorism has never been clearer,? Ghani said. ?What I am offering the Pakistan government, the Pakistan security apparatus, is the invitation to a comprehensive dialogue.? ?If Pakistan does not take this opportunity, I think they will pay a high price,? he said, without elaborating. ?Afghans are determined to fight,? he said. ?No one should mistake our will to defend our country.? Not only is the army better trained and profiting from a new generation of soldiers, but it gained experience because the massive cuts in the US-led international force under Obama forced Afghans to assume a bigger role in the fighting, Ghani said. When it was pointed out that the Taliban have expanded their control of territory, Ghani blamed the inability of the police to hold ground. The next phase of reforming Afghanistan?s security forces will focus on the police, he said. As for when the 16-year-long war would end, Ghani said, ?I think we are not talking a decade or longer. We are talking some limited years.?
  3. RAWALPINDI: Afghanistan's Ambassador to Pakistan, Omar Zakhilwal, called on Chief of Army Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa on Wednesday. The meeting took place at the General Headquarters in Rawalpindi. According to a tweet by the Afghan envoy, a "host of issues, including steps for peace and stability for both nations" were discussed. He also shared a picture of his earlier call-on on the army chief. In that meeting, held on August 2 this year, the two discussed matters of mutual interest, especially border management as the meeting came in the wake of the deadly mosque bombing in Herat, Afghanistan.
  4. Thousands of cricket-mad fans have been travelling across the war-torn country to watch the domestic T20 competition that ends Friday/AFP KABUL: Afghan soldier Ehsanullah waves a national flag as he dances half-naked in the stands of Kabul´s main cricket ground -- one of thousands of fans defying rising insecurity for the rare opportunity to see their favourite game live. The 23-year-old took time off from fighting Taliban insurgents in volatile Kandahar province to attend the Shpageeza Cricket League in the Afghan capital just days after a suicide bomber blew himself up outside the stadium. "I want to show my love and support the sport," said Ehsanullah, wearing only the baggy trousers of his traditional shalwar kameez to show off his chest painted in the national colours of green, red and black and his back scrawled with the name of Afghanistan´s teenage leg-spinner Rashid Khan. Thousands of cricket-mad fans have been travelling across the war-torn country to watch the domestic T20 competition that ends Friday. Photos posted on Twitter purportedly show a long convoy of mini buses packed with flag-waving supporters, some sitting on the rooftops, driving from neighbouring Logar province to catch the final days of play. The fifth edition of the six-team tournament has attracted big-name Afghan and foreign players, coaches and commentators, bringing much-needed cheer to a country worn down by grinding conflict. Players offer prayers ahead of a match at the Shpageeza Cricket League in Kabul/AFP The deadly violence almost reached the cricket ground on the third day of the tournament when a suicide bomber blew himself up at a police checkpoint near the stadium where hundreds of spectators were watching a game inside. Three people were killed including a policeman and five others were wounded in the blast that briefly interrupted play and rattled foreigners unaccustomed to explosions. While some of the foreign contingent left Afghanistan in the wake of the attack, most chose to stay after receiving assurances from President Ashraf Ghani that their security would be beefed up. "I don´t feel that I am in any danger... I stand in solidarity not only with the Afghan cricketers but with the people of Afghanistan," former Zimbabwe captain and commentator Alistair Campbell told AFP. Former England one-day captain Adam Hollioake, one of team coaches, tweeted: "I refuse to be terrorised. I stay til the job is done." ´Say no to terrorism´ After the blast fans returned to the stadium, forming queues hundreds of metres long as they waited patiently to get inside as heavily armed security forces patrolled the grounds. Spectators are happy to be able to watch a game banned in the late 1990s by the then ruling Taliban, who viewed sports as a distraction from religious duties but is now making a stunning revival. The country was catapulted into the elite club of Test nations in June and made its landmark Lord´s debut the following month. Spectators are happy to be able to watch a game banned in the late 1990s by the then ruling Taliban who viewed sports as a distraction from religious duties/AFP "We are scared but we have to say no to terrorism," said 22-year-old Shamsul Haq who travelled from the southeastern province of Paktika to sell Afghan national flags to spectators and watch the cricket. Matches are punctuated by the blare of team songs -- broadcast in Afghanistan´s two official languages of Dari and Pashto -- whenever a big-swinging batsman hits a four or a six, delighting the mostly male crowd. Fans unable to go to the stadium follow the competition on televisions in homes, shops and restaurants around the country. "I have come to the stadium only on the days when Rashid Khan´s team is playing and I watch the other matches on television," said Azizullah Shabab, 17, who skipped school to watch the tournament.
  5. Ashraf Ghani, president of Afghanistan, addresses the United Nations General Assembly at UN headquarters-AFP United Nations, United States: Afghan President Ashraf Ghani appealed Tuesday to Pakistan to work together to curb extremists, seeing an opportunity as the United States sends in more troops. Addressing the UN General Assembly, Ghani said US President Donald Trump´s new Afghan strategy sent a signal to Taliban guerrillas that they cannot win on the field and must negotiate peace. PM Abbasi, Erdogan agree on revival of Pak-Afghan-Turkey Trilateral process The two leaders agreed that a military solution wouldn?t establish peace, stability in Afghanistan "We welcome this strategy, which has now set us on a pathway to certainty. The Afghan people have looked to the United States for this type of resolve for years," Ghani said. Trump last month announced an Afghanistan strategy that reversed his previous calls to wind down America´s longest war, which was launched after the September 11, 2001 attacks. He instead has sent thousands more troops to Afghanistan and pledged a tougher line on Pakistan, which has long faced US criticism for its intelligence services´ ties with jihadists and for harboring Osama bin Laden. "We now also have an opportunity for a dialogue with our neighbors on how we can work together earnestly to eliminate terrorism and contain extremism," Ghani said. "I call upon Pakistan to engage with us on a comprehensive state to state dialogue on peace, security and regional cooperation leading to prosperity," he said. Pakistan has responded coolly to Trump´s criticism, with many Pakistanis noting that they themselves have been a major victim of attacks since their government sided with the United States following September 11.
  6. ISLAMABAD: The Federal Investigation Agency arrested on Thursday three members of an Afghan ring, which was involved in human trafficking. According to the FIA, the five-member group?s details are being obtained from the Afghan embassy. The group?s two members, Ali Istanbul and Hakim, are in Kabul. The Afghan group smuggled a man named Mohammed Rizwan through Iran to Turkey, said the FIA officials. The group has asked for 20,000 Euros from Rizwan?s family as ransom, the FIA added.
  7. Rashid Khan ADELAIDE: Afghanistan´s spin sensation Rashid Khan will play for the Adelaide Strikers in Australia´s Twenty20 Big Bash League later this year, the club said on Thursday. The 18-year-old, who was one of the most successful bowlers in this year´s Indian Premier League, will become the first Afghan to feature at the tournament. "I am very happy to have signed with the Strikers for the BBL," the leg-spinner said in a club statement. "It is a huge honour to be a part of such a great tournament and even more of an honour to be the first Afghanistan player to participate on the BBL stage." Adelaide Strikers coach Jason Gillespie hailed Rashid´s signing as a "major coup". "Rashid has set the world alight in T20 cricket with his energy, enthusiasm, and great control for a young guy," Gillespie said. "He has some great variations, can bowl stump-to-stump and can be very hard to pick. "We´re delighted to be able to offer him the opportunity to play for the Adelaide Strikers." Rashid has claimed 63 wickets in 29 one-day internationals, including the fourth best figures in one-day history -- 7 for 18 against the West Indies in June. He also became the first bowler to take a hat-trick in the T20 Caribbean Premier League, playing for the Guyana Amazon Warriors. The BBL season starts on December 20.
  8. KARACHI: Pakistan on Wednesday said that a military solution to the Afghan issue will create further complications, after its foreign minister returned home from a diplomatic offensive to engage regional powers which share a similar point of view on Afghanistan. Speaking on Geo News' programme 'Aaj Shahzaib Khanzada Kay Sath', Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif said all the three regional states - China, Iran and Turkey - acknowledged Pakistan's sacrifices (in the war against terrorism) and backed its stance beyond expectations. Trump backs off Afghan withdrawal, slams Pakistan over ?terrorist safe havens? Trump warns vital aid could be cut if Pakistan does not stop Pakistan decided to approach regional countries after US President Donald Trump announced his controversial new policy for South Asia, which included 'anti-Pakistan' remarks. Since then, Islamabad has gone on a diplomatic offensive, engaging regional countries that share its point of view with regards to Afghanistan. The minister stressed on the need for resolving the Afghan issue regionally and urged the countries affected by Afghanistan's situation to find a solution to it. Asif said that he has spoken to his Afghan counterpart and Pakistan's efforts were bearing good results. He said that he had briefed the prime minister on the issue and soon the matter will be presented before the National Security Committee. China reaffirms support for Pakistan in war against terrorism China, Pakistan anchor for peace in region: Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi Asif discusses regional situation, bilateral ties with Turkish leadership Pakistan decided to approach regional countries after Trump announced his controversial new policy for South Asia The minister said that he also had talks pertaining to India's political role in Afghanistan. "New Delhi won't have a political role in Afghanistan. It will only be restricted to the economic sector." He, however, said that India's investment in Afghanistan is not meant for its betterment, whereas the United States has clarified that New Delhi does not have a political role in Afghanistan. Last week, Asif stressed that the United States should respect Pakistan's territorial integrity. Khawaja Asif meets Iran FM, urges consensus among Afghanistan's neighbours Foreign minister is in Iran, expected to hold meeting with Iran President Hassan Rouhani "We want to stay engaged with the United States. We have had a long relationship with them, spanning 70 years,? he said, but lamented that people in Washington do not have a full comprehension of the facts. Asked about Chaudhry Nisar's criticism of his statement about "putting own house in order", the minister said the former interior minister expressed his personal opinion. He, however, stood firm on his statement saying it was said in the backdrop of the past four years, which was true.
  9. Former test cricketer Abdul Razzaq has signed a contract with the Afghan cricket league, it emerged on Tuesday. Razzaq will be a part of the team Amo Sharks participating in the Shpageeza Cricket League. Earlier, former cricketer Shahid Afridi had announced on Twitter that he will also play in the upcoming Afghan league. However, PCB sources had informed Geo News that the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) was not happy with Afridi's decision. In this regard, PCB has decided to not issue non-objection certificates (NoCs) to Pakistani cricketers in order to deter them from participating in the league. Sources also revealed that Afridi has approached PCB to seek an NOC regarding the Big Bash League but not the Afghan league. Other players who are expected to play for the Afghan league include Umar Akmal, Kamran Akmal, Babar Azam, Sohail Tanveer and Ruman Raees. All the matches of the tournament will be held in Kabul in September. Relations between Afghan cricket board and PCB soured after Afghanistan cancelled proposed home and away cricket fixtures with Pakistan in June. In response, PCB had cancelled the no objection certificate (NOC) for the Afghan League, which will be held in July. The two countries had mutually decided that 10 Pakistani cricketers will participate in the league. Moreover, the PCB also forbade all the cricketers and officials from participating or attending the Afghan League.
  10. It comes days after Afghan officials said the country´s own air force killed up to 13 civilians in separate strikes targeting a Taliban base in Herat-Reuters (File photo) Thirteen civilians from the same family were killed and another 15 wounded in a US air strike on Taliban fighters in eastern Afghanistan, Afghan authorities said Thursday. US Forces-Afghanistan said it has launched an investigation into the incident which an Afghan official said also killed more than a dozen insurgents hiding in a house in Dasht-e-Bari village in volatile Logar province near Kabul on Wednesday. It comes days after Afghan officials said the country´s own air force killed up to 13 civilians in separate strikes targeting a Taliban base in the western province of Herat. "In the operation the US forces came under the attack by the Taliban and foreign forces returned fire and forced the Taliban insurgents to hide in the civilian houses nearby," Saleem Saleh, a spokesman for the Logar provincial governor, told AFP. "Then the foreign forces called in air support and bombed the civilian house which led to civilian casualties." Saleh said the victims were from the same family and most of the dead were women and children. "I heard two big bangs and when I went out of my home I saw the building which was bombarded was totally destroyed," Nazar Khan Kochi told AFP. "We pulled out the dead bodies from the rubble and debris and buried them. "It was a very painful day for us," he said, describing the incident as a "massacre" and adding no Taliban were among the dead. Photos showed dead women and children wrapped in shrouds as relatives prepared to bury them. Logar provincial police spokesman Shahpoor Ahmadzai confirmed the number of casualties. The US is the only foreign force currently carrying out air strikes in Afghanistan. The US military said it has launched an official probe into the incident which comes three weeks after a US air strike allegedly killed 11 civilians in neighbouring Nangarhar province -- charges the Americans have vehemently denied. "United States Forces-Afghanistan takes all allegations of civilian casualties seriously and is working with our Afghan partners to determine the facts surrounding this incident (in Logar)," it said in a statement. Ordinary Afghans have borne the brunt of the grinding conflict which began in October 2001, with record high civilian deaths this year. In the first half of the year, 1,662 civilians were killed and more than 3,500 injured, with deaths in Kabul accounting for nearly 20 percent of the toll, according to a UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan report published last month.
  11. KABUL: At least 11 Afghan civilians were killed and 16 wounded on Wednesday when a NATO helicopter attacked a house where Taliban insurgents had taken shelter in Logar province, east of the capital, Kabul, the local governor said. There was no immediate confirmation that NATO or US aircraft were involved, but a spokesman for Resolute Support, the NATO-led mission in Kabul, said in an emailed statement it was aware of the reports and was looking into them. Logar Governor Halim Fedaee said the incident occurred in Dashte Bari district near the provincial capital Pul-e Alam. "The Taliban took position in a civilian house and fired a rocket at a NATO helicopter," the governor said. "The house owner begged the Taliban to leave, but they didn´t.? The helicopter took a turn, came and hit this house that caused these deaths. "The incident, a day after reports that an Afghan air strike killed at least 13 civilians in the western province of Herat, underlines the risk that a recent increase in air raids by US and Afghan forces will increase civilian casualties. United Nations figures showed a 43 per cent spike in civilian casualties from both Afghan and US air strikes in the first half of the year, with 95 killed and 137 wounded, as the pace of air operations has increased. Civilian casualties caused by US air strikes have long been a source of friction in Afghanistan, and the risk of further casualties may increase if the US steps up operations as part of President Donald Trump´s new strategy for Afghanistan. Earlier, Resolute Support denied a Taliban statement that a US helicopter had been shot down in Logar province. It said a helicopter had made a precautionary landing for a maintenance issue.
  12. Two bodyguards of an Afghan MP were shot dead in firing outside his house, followed by a suicide bomb, Tolo News reported. A suicide bomber exploded himself outside MP Zahir Qadir ?s house in Jalalabad while a second suicide bomber was shot dead by Qadir?s bodyguards, Tolo News quoted to the provincial governor's spokesman as saying. Governor?s spokesman Attaullah Khoghyani confirms explosion in Jalalabad and said two bodyguards were shot dead. He said the situation is now under control but the area has been cordoned off. Suicide bomber kills five in Kabul bank blast Bomb went off outside the Kabul Bank, which usually pays the salaries of security forces personnel Over the last 10 days, over 10 people were killed and scored injured in suicide bombing in various parts of Afghanistan.
  13. File photo/Reuters KABUL: An explosion hit a bank in an area of the Afghan capital Kabul on Tuesday close to the heavily protected US embassy compound, officials said. Interior Ministry spokesman Najib Danish said the blast occured at the entrance to a Kabul Bank branch, not far from the embassy. There was no immediate word on casualties.
  14. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Monday said the new US strategy was intended to send a strong message to the Taliban that ?we are not going anywhere?. Speaking to US media, he said that the ?conditions on the ground? in Afghanistan would determine the number of American troops in the war-torn country. Tillerson said that US President Donald Trump had been very clear that the new policy was a dramatic shift from a time-based military strategy to a conditions-based strategy. President Trump's Afghan policy to meet with failure, says PM Abbasi Prime Minister said that Pakistan's position has been very clear that there is no military solution to the Afghan conflict, ?Which means it will be dictated by conditions on the ground informed by battlefield commanders,? he said, ?he has delegated significant authority to Defence Secretary James Mattis to set troop levels, but also has been able to delegate for the military commanders in the field, decision-making, to begin to turn the tide against the Taliban.? ?Now, all of this is directed at sending a message to the Taliban that we are not going anywhere. We?re going to be here,? Tillerson said. He stated that Afghanistan has a history of being a refuge for some of the most devastating attacks carried out. ?As we all know, the attack of 9/11 was organised and carried out from Afghanistan. So, in Afghanistan, we have to secure Afghanistan in a way that that can never occur again because there?s no territory available to organisations to do so,? the secretary of state said. Tillerson reiterated that the US President has been clear in his speech that the US was not undertaking nation-building in Afghanistan anymore. ?So, we will be shifting our diplomatic and aid and development programs as well to coincide with the president?s view that the Afghan government and that Afghan people must own their form of government,? he said. ?They must come to some reconciliation with all ethnic groups, including the Taliban, as to how they can secure their country, as a peaceful country, one that does not support terrorism does not provide safe havens for terrorists and does not align itself with any terrorist organisations or countries that do. That?s what winning looks like,? he added.
  15. Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi on Monday reiterated that US President Donald Trump's newly announced Afghanistan policy will be met with failure. In an interview to a foreign news channel, PM Abbasi said that Pakistan's position has been very clear that there is no military solution to the Afghan conflict and the neighbouring state can have peace only through a political solution. ?From day one we have been saying very clearly the military strategy in Afghanistan has not worked and it will not work," he said. There has to be a political settlement. That?s the bottom-line.? PM Abbasi stated that President Trump's Afghan policy will also result in a failure, adding that the government of Pakistan supports the war against terrorism but it won't allow the war to come into the country. He said that to ensure peace in the region Pakistan is ready to have a dialogue with every country including India.
  16. Photo: FILE KANDAHAR: A Taliban suicide bomber killed at least 13 people and wounded several more in an attack on a convoy of Afghan soldiers in Helmand province late Sunday, an official said. "A suicide bomber detonated an explosive-filled car as the Afghan National Army convoy passed a small market in Nawa District of Helmand," Omar Zwak, a spokesman for the provincial governor, told AFP. He added that civilians and forces personnel were among the dead while more than a dozen others had been wounded. A source working at a nearby hospital told AFP on condition of anonymity that the bodies of 15 victims had been brought to the hospital. Another 19 injured were also admitted, he added. "The majority of the dead belong to Afghan forces and most of the wounded are civilians," the source said. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack in a WhatsApp message sent to journalists.
  17. ISLAMABAD: Foreign Minister Khawaja Asif on Friday said that they were not surprised by US President Donald Trump recent speech outlining new regional policy. Speaking on Geo News' program 'Naya Pakistan', the minister they wanted to give a coordinated response to Trump's statement, which would have input from the government, military and intelligence community, which is why it took a couple of days. He said that when they informed Afghanistan that their territory was being used for attacks in Pakistan, the Afghan government said that up to 40 percent of their territory was not under their control. Asif denied that any terrorist organisation has bases in Pakistan and asked why the terrorists would need bases in Pakistan when they can freely operate in Afghanistan. "They (terrorists) do not need bases inside Pakistan if they have such a huge area to operate from in Afghanistan," he said. Asked about possibility of any US incursion into Pakistan, the minister said, "I cannot comment if they are thinking so. But I ask what have they achieved in the past with such drone attacks and incursions." He said that they would make all efforts for a political solution. "We are victims of terrorism, we have been on the forefront of this war." Asif went on to question as to who enabled the Taliban to operate freely inside Afghanistan and raise funds necessary to wage the insurgency.
  18. KABUL: An unknown number of gunmen attacked a mosque in Qala-e-Najarha area in Kabul?s PD11 area around 1pm on Friday afternoon, Tolo News reported quoting eyewitnesses. Eyewitnesses and residents of the area said an explosion has occurred inside the yard of Imam Zaman Mosque and gunfire is continuing in the area. Police have cordoned off the area following the attack. Many worshippers were inside the mosque when the explosion took place, reports said. This is a breaking story and will be updated accordingly
  19. Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying while addressing a press conference on Thursday. Photo: www.fmprc.gov.cn BEIJING: Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying, during her regular press conference on Thursday, said that the role of Pakistan in the Afghan issue should be ?valued?. ?We need to value the important role of Pakistan in the Afghan issue and respect the sovereignty and legitimate security concerns of Pakistan,? she said, according to Chinese foreign ministry press release. ?The Chinese side is willing to maintain communication and coordination with the United States on the Afghan issue and make concerted efforts for achieving the peace and stability of Afghanistan and the region at large,? she remarked. She further added, ?The Chinese side is actively committed to promoting the peace and reconciliation process in Afghanistan. We always maintain that political dialogue is the only way out for resolving the Afghan issue.? The international community should support the "Afghan-led" and "Afghan-owned" reconciliation process, support Afghanistan in realising the widespread and inclusive political reconciliation, support the Afghan people in exploring a development path suiting their own national conditions and support the Afghan government in enhancing its counter-terrorism capability and combating extreme terrorist forces, added Chunying. After China, Russia defends Pakistan against Trump?s criticism Putting pressure [on Pakistan] may seriously destabilise region-wide security situation, says Russian envoy to Kabul On relations with Pakistan, she remarked that Pakistan?s Foreign Secretary Tehmina Janjua has visited China recently. ?China and Pakistan are all-weather strategic cooperative partners and the two sides always firmly support each other on the issues concerning each other's core interests. Against the backdrop of the complex and volatile international and regional situations, the strategic significance of the China-Pakistan relations has become more prominent.? The Chinese side appreciates the efforts made by Pakistan to fight terrorism and safeguard the security of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor and is willing to strengthen all-round cooperation with Pakistan so as to achieve common development, she added. She also pointed out that Janjua had said that China and Pakistan enjoy ironclad friendship and no matter how the political situation changes in Pakistan, its friendly policy towards China remains unchanged. The Pakistani side will as always firmly stand together with China on the issues concerning China's core interests and join hands with China to advance the building of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor and continuously move forward the bilateral relations, she added.
  20. The latest US strategy appears to amount to around 4,000 new troops KABUL: US President Donald Trump has opened the door to the deployment to Afghanistan of thousands more US troops, in his first speech outlining American policy after nearly 16 years of grinding war. Reversing course from an earlier assertion that he would end US involvement in a conflict that has cost thousands of lives and trillions of dollars, Trump also hit out at neighbouring Pakistan, which he said was offering safe haven to "agents of chaos". Here are some key questions about the impact Trump´s strategy could have in a country known as "the graveyard of empires". What has Trump announced? He refused to give figures or details. But the strategy appears to amount to around 4,000 new troops, largely freed from Obama-era restrictions and thus able to take on greater frontline combat roles to target "terrorist and criminal networks". The 8,500 US personnel currently in-country are largely restricted to NATO´s mission of training the Afghan Army and offering strategic support on certain missions, though some are already conducting frontline operations. The other main plank of Trump´s outline strategy was to pressure Pakistan, a move which has already been attempted repeatedly attempted by Washington. Analysts point out that US administrations have for years complained that Islamabad talks a good game about helping to defeat extremists, but in fact offers refuge to the Afghan Taliban in particular, and stokes the insurgency. Will more boots on the ground make a difference? Not on the face of it. Former President Barack Obama authorised a massive surge that saw troop numbers top out at over 100,000, a move that decreased violence but did not result in a decisive blow. If the might of the US military could not defeat the militants then, many analysts argue that 12,500 are unlikely to secure a lasting victory. US intervention in Afghanistan: Key developments A timeline on key developments in the US military presence in Afghanistan "Probably the greatest contradiction that emerged from (the speech) is the claim we will learn from history and yet none of the policies have not been tried before," said James Der Derian of the Centre for International Security Studies at the University of Sydney. Others point out however that Afghan forces are now at a point where a smaller number of advisers more strategically deployed could make a difference. How will the Taliban react? With predictable violence and from a position of relative strength, observers say. They are likely to seek to send an early message, perhaps with a major urban attack -- the like of which they proved themselves capable with a massive truck bomb in Kabul´s diplomatic quarter in May. "The Taliban and other belligerents are likely to respond with a new wave of violence across the country," including in urban areas, said Javid Ahmad from West Point´s Modern War Institute. The Taliban has strengthened in recent years, and Afghan forces, beset by spiralling casualties, have struggled to contain them since NATO ended its combat mission in 2014. A US watchdog says Afghan forces control less than 60 percent of the country, with the rest either in Taliban hands or being violently contested. Unlike the war-weary United States, the Taliban has an almost endless capacity to absorb loss of life among its ranks. Nor does the group need -- as Washington does -- to "win" a grinding conflict that US commanders have described as a "stalemate". "(The militants) can wait out another 4,000 troops. The Taliban have survived much worse," said Der Derian, echoing a proverb long attributed to the Taliban about the war: "You may have the watches, but we have the time". Will the pressure on Pakistan work? Trump returned to the theme that has been a near-constant refrain from Washington since shortly after the 9/11 attacks: Pakistan must stop supporting extremists. With its long, porous border and poorly policed tribal areas, Pakistan makes a near-perfect refuge for Taliban, out of the range of Afghanistan´s under-performing army and its American protectors. Trump backs off Afghan withdrawal, slams Pakistan over ?terrorist safe havens? Trump warns vital aid could be cut if Pakistan does not stop Despite being a signed-up ally in the US "War on Terror", Pakistan stands accused of fuelling the insurgency next door, in part as a bulwark against the influence of India -- a modern-day "Great Game" reminiscent of the imperial rivalry between Britain and Russia in the 19th century. Years of pressure from Washington have not changed Pakistani policy, and experts say that sharp words from political neophyte Trump are unlikely to make much difference. "Pakistan´s enemy is India and it sees India as an existential threat, and Pakistan believes that the Taliban and the Haqqani network can help keep India at bay in Afghanistan," said Michael Kugelman of the Wilson Center in Washington. "No matter what threat or punishment the US throws at Pakistan, Pakistan is not going to change these ironclad, immutable strategic interests."
  21. US President Donald Trump during his first formal address to the nation as commander-in-chief WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump cleared the way for the deployment of thousands more US troops to Afghanistan Monday, backtracking from his promise to rapidly end America´s longest war, while pillorying ally Pakistan for offering safe haven to "agents of chaos." In his first formal address to the nation as commander-in-chief, Trump discarded his previous criticism of the 16-year-old war as a waste of time and money, admitting things looked different from "behind the desk in the Oval Office." "My instinct was to pull out," Trump said as he spoke of his frustration with a war that has killed thousands of US troops and cost US taxpayers trillions of dollars. But following months of deliberation, Trump said he had concluded "the consequences of a rapid exit are both predictable and unacceptable" leaving a "vacuum" that terrorists "would instantly fill." While Trump refused to offer detailed troop numbers, senior White House officials said he had already authorized his defense secretary to deploy up to 3,900 more troops to Afghanistan. He warned that the approach would now be more pragmatic than idealistic. Security assistance to Afghanistan was "not a blank check" he said, warning he would not send the military to "construct democracies in faraway lands or create democracies in our own image." "We are not nation building again. We are killing terrorists." The US has grown increasingly weary of the conflict that began in October 2001 as a hunt for the 9/11 attackers has turned into a vexed effort to keep Afghanistan´s divided and corruption-hindered democracy alive amid a brutal Taliban insurgency. The Daesh group later vowed it would make the country "a graveyard" for the United States as long as American troops remained in the country. Trump also indicated that single-minded approach would extend to US relations with troubled ally Pakistan, which consecutive US administrations have criticised for links with the Taliban and for harboring militants ? like Osama bin Laden. "We have been paying Pakistan billions and billions of dollars at the same time they are housing the very terrorists that we are fighting," he said, warning that vital aid could be cut. ?That will have to change and that will change immediately." Ahead of the speech Pakistan´s military brushed off speculation that Trump could signal a stronger line against Islamabad, insisting the country has done all it can to tackle militancy. "Let it come," army spokesman Major General Asif Ghafoor told reporters, referring to Trump´s decision. "Even if it comes... Pakistan shall do whatever is best in the national interest." Door open to political deal with Taliban Trump for the first time also left the door open to an eventual political deal with the Taliban. "Someday, after an effective military effort, perhaps it will be possible to have a political settlement that includes elements of the Taliban in Afghanistan," he said. "But nobody knows if or when that will ever happen," he added, before vowing that "America will continue its support for the Afghan government and military as they confront the Taliban in the field." His Secretary of State Rex Tillerson went further, saying the United States would "stand ready to support peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban without preconditions." US intervention in Afghanistan: Key developments A timeline on key developments in the US military presence in Afghanistan The Trump administration had originally promised a new Afghan plan by mid-July, but Trump was said to be dissatisfied by initial proposals to deploy a few thousand more troops. His new policy will raise questions about what, if anything, can be achieved by making further deployments, or repeating the demands of previous administrations in more forceful terms. ´Rigorous debate´ Trump´s announcement comes amid a month of serious turmoil for his administration, which has seen several top White House officials fired and revelations that members of Trump´s campaign are being investigated by a federal grand jury. He sought in his address to convince Americans weary of his controversial off-the-cuff remarks. "I studied Afghanistan in great detail and from every conceivable angle," he said, hoping to show he has sufficiently pondered the decision to send more young Americans into mortal danger. One of the main voices arguing for withdrawal, Trump´s nationalistic chief strategist Steve Bannon, was removed from his post on Friday. His strategy did however win over national security-focused Republicans with whom he has had strained relations, such as influential Senator John McCain. China defends ally Pakistan China defended its ally Pakistan on Tuesday after US President Donald Trump said the United States could no longer be silent about Pakistan´s "safe havens" for militants and warned it had much to lose by continuing to "harbour terrorists". Asked about Trump´s speech, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said Pakistan was on the front line in the struggle against terrorism and had made "great sacrifices" and "important contributions" in the fight. "We believe that the international community should fully recognise Pakistan´s anti-terrorism," she told a daily news briefing. "We are happy to see Pakistan and the United States carry out anti-terror cooperation on the basis of mutual respect, and work together for security and stability in the region and world." China and Pakistan consider each other "all-weather friends" and have close diplomatic, economic and security ties. China has its own security concerns in the region, in particular any links between militants in Pakistan and Afghanistan and Daesh groups China blames for violence in its far western region of Xinjiang. "We hope the relevant US policies can help promote the security, stability and development of Afghanistan and the region," Hua said. Senior US officials warned security assistance for Pakistan could be reduced unless the nuclear-armed nation cooperated more in preventing militants from using safe havens on its soil. Afghanistan hails Trump?s revised strategy Afghanistan welcomed Trump?s revised vision for the Afghan war, stating that it was the ?result of intense deliberations? and took into account ?both our countries? needs and considerations.? Afghanistan?s Ambassador to the US Hamdullah Mohib released a statement hailing Trump?s announcement regarding US policy towards Afghanistan and Southeast Asia. Afghanistan hails Trump?s revised strategy on Afghan war Strategy ?result of intense deliberations? and takes into account ?both countries? needs and considerations Afghan President Ashraf Ghani welcomed Trump?s announcement in a tweet later. In 2010, the United States had upwards of 100,000 US military personnel deployed to Afghanistan. Today that figure is around 8,400 US troops and the situation is as deadly as ever. More than 2,500 Afghan police and troops have been killed already this year.
  22. Trump has cleared the way for deployment of thousands more US troops to Afghanistan Afghanistan on Monday welcomed US President Donald Trump?s revised vision for the Afghan war, stating that it was the ?result of intense deliberations? and took into account ?both our countries? needs and considerations.? Afghanistan?s Ambassador to the US Hamdullah Mohib released a statement hailing Trump?s announcement regarding US policy towards Afghanistan and Southeast Asia. ?This is the first time a focus has been put on what Afghanistan must have to succeed, and we are grateful for this outcome,? Ambassador Mohib said in the statement. The statement further read: ?President Trump has embraced a strategy that gives Afghanistan what it needs, specifically: - a shift away from talking about timetables and numbers to letting conditions on the ground determine military strategy; - the integration of America?s military, economic and political power to achieve our shared goals; - expanded authority to move swiftly against terrorist activities and criminal networks in place of micromanagement from Washington; and - a breaking of the silence over Pakistan?s shelters and sanctuaries for terrorists. Like America, Afghanistan also wants an ?honourable and enduring outcome? to this fight, for all the Afghan, US and NATO soldiers who have served and sacrificed to advance the cause of peace.? Trump, in his first formal address to the nation as commander-in-chief, cleared the way for the deployment of thousands more US troops to Afghanistan Monday, backtracking from his promise to rapidly end America´s longest war. Trump discarded his previous criticism of the 16-year-old war as a waste of time and money, admitting things looked different from "behind the desk in the Oval Office." Pakistan needs to show 'commitment to civilisation, order, peace': Trump Talking about his plans, Trump said military power alone will not bring peace in Afghanistan and that Pakistan needs to step up its efforts "My instinct was to pull out," Trump said as he spoke of his frustration with a war that has killed thousands of US troops and cost US taxpayers trillions of dollars. But following months of deliberation, Trump said he had concluded "the consequences of a rapid exit are both predictable and unacceptable" leaving a "vacuum" that terrorists "would instantly fill."
  23. BACKGROUND: This photo ? taken on November 28, 2010 ? shows a US soldier blowing up a wall with explosives during a patrol around Ahmed Khan camp, Kandahar, Afghanistan. AFP/Martin Bureau; SUPERIMPOSED: This photo ? taken on June 16, 2017 ? shows US President Donald Trump leaving Marine One, White House, Washington, DC. AFP/Saul Loeb WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump unveils his long-awaited strategy for Afghanistan on Monday, putting his mark on America's longest war in a first formal address to the nation as commander-in-chief. Having repeatedly described the 16-year Afghan war as a waste of time and money, Trump now looks set to announce the deployment of more troops in an evening prime-time speech. Like his predecessor Barack Obama, Trump has taken months to decide between an array of difficult choices in Afghanistan. A conflict that began in October 2001 as a hunt for the 9/11 attackers has turned into a vexed effort to keep Afghanistan's divided and corruption-hindered democracy alive. Throughout that time, Democrat and Republican US presidents have groped for a winning strategy ? flitting between trying to chase down extremists, take difficult terrain or beat back a dogged Taliban insurgency. Thousands of US troops have died and the war has cost US taxpayers trillions of dollars. The Trump administration had originally promised a new plan by mid-July, but Trump was said to be dissatisfied by initial proposals to deploy a few thousand more troops. His advisors went back to the drawing board, examining an expanded strategy for the broader South Asian region, including Pakistan ? which holds some influence over the Taliban. There are currently about 8,400 US troops supporting Afghanistan's security forces in the fight, but the situation has remained as deadly as ever. More than 2,500 Afghan police and troops have been killed already this year and hours before Trump's remarks there was a stark reminder of the Taliban's reach when a missile landed on a field in Kabul's heavily fortified diplomatic zone. Trump has been wary of international involvements but is eager to show success and steel in the realm of national security. As president, Trump has surrounded himself with military generals ? from his national security advisor to his chief of staff to his defence secretary ? who have urged him to stay the course. Address to US troops On Friday, Trump gathered generals and top aides at the bucolic presidential retreat in Camp David, Maryland, saying afterwards that "many decisions" had been made. His options are said to include an increase in troop numbers ? in the region of 4,000. But questions remain about what, if anything, can be achieved by that deployment. In 2010, the United States had upwards of 100,000 US military personnel deployed to Afghanistan. "The Afghan government remains divided and weak, its security forces will take years of expensive US and allied support to become fully effective, and they may still lose even with such support," said Anthony Cordesman of The Center for Strategic and International Studies. Trump will unveil his decision at 9 pm (0100 GMT Tuesday) in an address to the nation delivered in front of US troops at Fort Myer, just outside Washington. The US leader will "provide an update on the path forward for America's engagement in Afghanistan and South Asia," the White House said in a statement. In advance of the announcement, Vice President Mike Pence called Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and Trump's Secretary of State Rex Tillerson made calls to his Pakistani, Indian and Afghan counterparts. Top members of Congress were due to receive a briefing from senior administration officials. Pakistan's military brushed off speculation that Trump's new strategy could include taking a stronger line against Islamabad, insisting the country has done all it can to tackle militancy. "Let it come," army spokesman Major General Asif Ghafoor told reporters, referring to Trump's decision. "Even if it comes... Pakistan shall do whatever is best in the national interest." 'Rigorous debate' Trump's announcement comes amid a month of serious turmoil for his administration, which has seen several top White House officials fired and revelations that members of Trump's campaign are being investigated by a federal grand jury. The decision on Afghanistan could have wide-ranging political repercussions for Trump, who faces a backlash from his base if he reverses a major campaign pledge and deepens US involvement. One of the main voices arguing for withdrawal, Trump's nationalistic chief strategist Steve Bannon, was removed from his post on Friday. Among the advisors present at Camp David was new White House chief of staff John Kelly, a former Marine Corps general whose son died in Afghanistan in 2010. Doubling down on the existing strategy will also signify the moment Trump takes responsibility for the success or failures that come with it. And Americans will be looking closely at the tenor of his address. Controversial off-the-cuff remarks and statements strewn with falsehoods have become a hallmark of Trump's presidency. Many will be looking for evidence that a president who has shown little interest in policy has sufficiently pondered any decision to send more young Americans into mortal danger. Trump's Defense Secretary Jim Mattis confirmed in Amman, Jordan Sunday that the administration had agreed on a new Afghan strategy after "rigorous" debate, but refused to provide details. "Everyone who had equity was heard," he said, including budget officials responsible for funding the effort. This photo ? taken on November 28, 2010 ? shows a soldier of the Afghan National Army (ANA) as he patrols around Ahmed Khan camp near Kandahar city. AFP/Martin Bureau
  24. US Army soldiers from the 2nd Platoon, B battery 2-8 field artillery, fire a howitzer artillery piece at Seprwan Ghar forward fire base in Panjwai, Kandahar, Afghanistan, June 12, 2011. REUTERS/Baz Ratner/Files KABUL: The Taliban told US President Donald Trump in an open letter on Tuesday that the military situation in Afghanistan was "far worse than you realize", and sending in more troops would be self-destructive. A senior Taliban official told Reuters the rare decision to address Trump directly was timed to coincide with the president's deliberations on the future of US policy in Afghanistan. "Previous experiences have shown that sending more troops to Afghanistan will not result in anything other than further destruction of American military and economical might," the Taliban said in the lengthy English-language letter. It criticised the Afghan government as "stooges", "lying, corrupt leaders" and "repulsive sellouts" who were providing Washington with "rosy pictures" of the military position. The Taliban waged an increasingly violent insurgency against the Western-backed Afghan government since losing power in a US-led invasion after the Sept. 11 attacks in 2001. Those attacks were planned by al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden from a base in Afghanistan. "The war situation in Afghanistan is far worse than you realize!" the letter said, arguing that the only thing preventing the Taliban from seizing major cities was a fear of causing civilian casualties. The senior US commander in Afghanistan, General John Nicholson, has requested several thousand additional troops to act as advisers to the struggling Afghan security forces. Influential voices including Republican Senator John McCain have also urged an "enduring" US military presence in Afghanistan. But such plans have faced scepticism in the White House, where Trump and several top aides have criticized years of American military intervention and foreign aid. US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters on Monday that the Trump administration was "very, very close" to a decision on Afghanistan, adding that all options were on the table. However, U.S officials believe it could take weeks for a South Asia strategy to be approved. "We have noticed that you have understood the errors of your predecessors and have resolved to thoroughly rethink your new strategy in Afghanistan," the Taliban told Trump. "A number of warmongering congressmen and generals in Afghanistan are pressing you to protract the war in Afghanistan because they seek to preserve their military privileges." Some Taliban leaders disagreed with publishing the letter as they believe the group is close to being able to end the war on its own terms, while the "Americans are no longer in a position to fight this never-ending war," one Taliban official said. The first official said the Taliban was open to "discuss all issues with the United States for bringing peace to Afghanistan" if American troops are withdrawn. "Everyone now understands that the main driver of war in Afghanistan is foreign occupation," the Taliban letter said. "The Afghans have no ill-intention toward the Americans or any other nation around the world but if anyone violates their sanctums then they are mighty proficient at beating and defeating the transgressors."
  25. KABUL: Two Afghan women working for a security firm searching people entering Bagram air base near the Afghan capital Kabul were killed on Wednesday and two others wounded by unknown gunmen, officials said. The four were shot outside the base by two masked gunmen on a motorbike, said Wahida Shahkar, a spokeswoman for the provincial governor of Parwan. "Two of them were killed and two wounded," she said. "The attackers managed to escape the area." There was no immediate claim of responsibility. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said he was checking the report. In June, six Afghan guards working at Bagram for a private security contractor were killed while on their way to work in an attack claimed by the Taliban. There was no immediate comment from the U.S. military which runs Bagram, the largest US base in Afghanistan. The number of Afghan personnel working at Bagram was cut sharply last year after a mechanic detonated a suicide vest, killing four Americans and wounding 17 other people.