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Found 35 results

  1. The specter of Chinese influence has become a constant source of headlines in Australia. Photo: Reuters BEIJING: One of Australia?s largest independent publishers said it decided to delay the publication of a book which alleges widespread Chinese government influence in Australian institutions due to legal concerns. Sydney-based Allen & Unwin said in a statement on Sunday that it decided to delay publication of the book, ?Silent Invasion?, following ?extensive legal advice?. It said the book?s author, Clive Hamilton, was unwilling to delay publication and requested the return of the book?s rights. Hamilton said the publisher?s chief executive, Robert Gorman, sent him an email on Wednesday saying that the reason for the delay was due to concerns over possible legal action from Beijing. The email from Gorman, which was reviewed by Reuters, said the scheduled publishing date of April next year ?was too soon to publish the book and allow us to adequately guard against potential threats to the book and the company from possible action by Beijing?. The email cited fears of a ?defamation action?. Allen & Unwin?s statement on Sunday, from Louise Cornege, its head of publicity, did not specify which court cases it was referring to. Gorman did not respond to requests for comment. Hamilton, an Australian who has previously published eight books with Allen & Unwin, said the ?shadow cast by Beijing is enough to make them so nervous about the consequences of publishing criticism of the Communist Party?. China?s State Council Information Office, which doubles as the ruling Chinese Communist Party?s spokesman?s office, did not immediately respond to a request for comment sent on Sunday. Its foreign ministry did not immediately reply to a faxed request for comment sent on Monday. Concern in Australia that Beijing may be extending its influence in the country has become a topic of political debate and media coverage over the past year. In June, Australian Broadcasting Corporation and Fairfax Media, publisher of the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age newspapers, published reports saying that there was a concerted campaign by China and its proxies to ?infiltrate? the Australian political process and institutions to promote Chinese interests. China has denied the claims in the reports, which the Chinese Foreign Ministry has said were ?totally unfounded and irresponsible?. Fairfax and the ABC declined to comment. Australia?s Attorney-General George Brandis said in June that ?the threat of political interference by foreign intelligence services is a problem of the highest order and is getting worse?. He said the Australian government had conducted a ?comprehensive review? and planned to strengthen the country?s espionage and foreign interference laws. Hamilton said his book was the ?first comprehensive national study of Beijing?s programme of exerting influence on another nation?. The book documented the influence and penetration of the Chinese Communist Party in Australian political parties, universities and cultural organisations, as well as the Chinese diaspora in Australia, he said in a telephone interview. The delay of the book comes after two international publishing houses ? Springer Nature, which publishes science magazines Nature and Scientific American, and Cambridge University Press ? were criticised recently for restricting access to articles on sensitive subjects in China. In August, Cambridge University Press, which had initially blocked online access to hundreds of scholarly articles in China reversed its position and reposted the material, following an outcry over academic freedom. Cambridge University said at the time that the move to block content had been a ?temporary decision?. Springer said early this month that it had pulled access to a small number of articles in China to comply with regulations, adding that it viewed the move as regrettable but necessary. Beijing has said all publications imported into China must comply with Chinese laws and regulations.
  2. Australia?s government-built $36 billion broadband network, already under attack from underwhelmed customers, has found a new and formidable enemy - cockatoos are chewing through cables across the country. Repairing the damage wrought on the broadband system, including replacing steel-braid wires that the pesky parrots have gnawed, has already cost A$80,000 ($61,500), network builder NBN Co said on Friday. The company estimates the bill could rise sharply as more damage is uncovered and more cables are rolled out in the national telecommunications infrastructure project, which is not due to be completed until around 2021. ?They are constantly sharpening their beaks and as a result will attack and tear apart anything they come across,? said NBN Co project manager Chedryian Bresland in a blog post on the company?s website on Friday. ?Unfortunately, they?ve developed a liking to our cables ... these birds are unstoppable when in a swarm.? Yellow-crested cockatoos are prolific in Australia and well-known for their voracious appetites for everything from fruit crops to wooden window frames. Much of the cable chomping has occurred in grain-growing regions in Australia?s southeast. ?It would have to be an acquired taste, because it?s not their usual style,? Gisela Kaplan, a professor in animal behaviour at the University of New England, told Reuters. ?Cockatoos usually go for wood, or strip the bark off trees, They don?t usually go for cables. But it might be the colour or the position of the cables that?s attracted them,? she said. The broadband network itself has come under fire for poor service and slow speeds, with customer complaints spiking nearly 160 percent this year, according to government figures released last month. Australia?s average internet speed of 11.1 megabits per second ranks 50th in the world, according to the most recent State of the Internet report by Akamai Technologies, an IT company specializing in internet speed technology. NBN Co is installing protective casing it says will protect the wires from birds in the future.
  3. Actor Russel Crowe. Photo: Getty/File SYDNEY: The 600 asylum seekers barricaded inside an abandoned detention centre in Papua New Guinea without food or running water are Australia?s ?shame?, Oscar-winning actor Russell Crowe said on Thursday, offering to house six of the detainees. For two days, the men in the Manus Island Centre have defied efforts by Australia and Papua New Guinea to close the camp, saying they fear violence from the local community if they are moved elsewhere. The stand-off was a ?disgrace,? the star of the films ?Gladiator? and ?Les Misérables? told his 2.7 million followers in a series of messages on social network Twitter. ?I believe I could house and find jobs for six,? Crowe tweeted. ?I?m sure there?d be other Australians who would do the same.? The stand-off has prompted condemnation, particularly from bodies such as the United Nations, though Crowe?s intervention could spotlight the issue at a time when some detainees are showing the ill-effects of having no food for two days. A spokeswoman for Australia?s immigration minister Peter Dutton refused to comment. She said there had been no change in the government?s policy of refusing to allow any asylum seekers arriving by boat to reach Australian shores, and detaining them instead in camps in Papua New Guinea and Nauru in the South Pacific. The issue will be a key element of talks between Australia?s Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and his New Zealand counterpart Jacinda Ardern on Sunday in Sydney. Ardern has said a 2013 offer by former Prime Minister John Key to resettle 150 refugees held in Australian detention centres remains on the table. Crowe, a New Zealand citizen who has lived in Australia for many years, received the Best Actor award of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 2001, for his performance in ?Gladiator?.
  4. Australian Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce reacts as he sits in the House of Representatives at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, October 25-Reuters CANBERRA: Australia?s High Court ruled on Friday that Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce is ineligible to remain in parliament, a stunning decision that cost the government its one-seat parliamentary majority and forced a by-election. The Australian dollar fell a quarter of a US cent after the court announced its ruling and ordered that Joyce must seek a new mandate in his rural New South Wales state electorate. That left Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull?s center-right coalition in the precarious position of a minority government. Turnbull?s Liberal Party is the senior party in a coalition with the smaller National Party, which Joyce led. Turnbull must now win the support of one of three independent lawmakers to keep his minority government afloat, with two sitting weeks of parliament left until it recesses for the year. Joyce was one of seven politicians whose eligibility to sit in parliament was thrown into doubt in recent months when it was found they were dual citizens, which bars them from being elected to the national parliament under Australia?s constitution. Joyce, who renounced his dual New Zealand citizenship in August, said he would stand in the by-election, which is likely to be held in early December. ?It is a tough game, politics,? Joyce told reporters in the rural town of Tamworth in his electorate. ?You take the hits and the sacrifices.? All seven lawmakers accepted they were dual nationals when they were elected last year but had claimed they were unaware of their status at the time. Some were conferred a second nationality by birth, others by descent. Of the remaining six, who were from the coalition and minority parties, four were also found ineligible to hold parliamentary office. Some had already resigned. All were senators, which meant seats in the upper house of parliament could be assigned to party alternatives if they were ruled ineligible. Australian Solicitor-General Stephen Donaghue had urged the seven justices of the High Court not to interpret the constitution literally. He argued that five of the seven, including three Cabinet members, should be cleared because they were unaware that they had contravened the constitutional requirement at the time.
  5. George Young was best known for his behind-the-scenes work helping create one of the biggest rock acts in the world, AC/DC. Photo: AFP SYDNEY: Australian music pioneer George Young, a driving force behind AC/DC which was fronted by his brothers Angus and Malcolm, has died aged 70, the band and his publishing house said Monday. Young shot to fame in the 1960s as a member of Sydney-based The Easybeats and became an established songwriter, penning classics like "Love is in the Air" and "Friday on my Mind" with long-time collaborator Harry Vanda. But he was best known for his behind-the-scenes work helping create one of the biggest rock acts in the world, co-producing many AC/DC albums including "Let There Be Rock", "Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap", and "High Voltage". "It is with pain in our heart that we have to announce the passing of our beloved brother and mentor George Young," the band said in a statement. "Without his help and guidance there would not have been an AC/DC. "As a musician, songwriter, producer, advisor and much, much more, you could not ask for a more dedicated and professional man." George was a teenager when he emigrated from Scotland to Australia with his brothers and was the first to win acclaim as a guitarist for the extremely popular The Easybeats. After the band broke up, Young and Vanda concentrated on writing and producing pop and rock songs for other artists under the umbrella of Albert Productions. "George was a pioneer who, with close friends Harry Vanda and Ted Albert, created a new sound for the Australian music industry," said Albert chief executive David Albert. "He will be missed." Fellow Glaswegian and Cold Chisel frontman Jimmy Barnes also paid tribute, tweeting: "George Young RIP. What a huge loss for music. A great songwriter, producer and a great human being."
  6. SYDNEY: A crocodile is "highly likely" to have killed an elderly woman who wandered away from her aged-care home on Australia´s northeast coast, police said Friday. Clothing and a walking stick belonging to 79-year-old Anne Cameron were found along with human remains by a creek near the tourist town of Port Douglas on Thursday. Cameron, who was last seen on Tuesday and suffered from dementia, had wandered from her care facility in the past but police said they are not yet sure how she came to be in the remote bushland. "We strongly suspect now that there has been involvement of a crocodile attack given the location of those items and the human remains located close to a watercourse," Queensland Police Acting Inspector Ed Lukin told reporters Friday. "There are no other persons missing in the Port Douglas area, so it is highly likely to be those of the missing person," he added, referring to remains found at the site. Forensic tests are still to be completed but Lukin said police were confident the woman was taken by a crocodile, which is common in the area. Authorities are conducting a search by air and boat to locate the offending reptile. "We are looking for an animal that is showing a level of abnormal behaviour," Queensland´s department of environment wildlife director Michael Joyce said. "They may show a level of boldness that is different from the other crocodiles in that river system." Joyce said a decision would be made on the fate of the animal once it was captured. Cameron´s family said they were devastated by the loss. They had only recently moved her to the area and said she would often go for afternoon walks and get lost. "Mum even said to me when we were out for walks if I actually turned the wrong direction I am frightened I would lose my way," her son Craig Eggins told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. "We are certain she got disorientated... then she became confused as to which way she was supposed to go." In August a 2.6-metre (8.5-foot) long saltwater crocodile was reportedly caught at Dickson Inlet near Four Mile Beach in Port Douglas. The beach was closed in April when a four-metre croc was spotted swimming offshore, while there had been several attacks by the reptiles on dogs in the area this year. Saltwater crocodile numbers have exploded since they were declared a protected species in the 1970s, with recent attacks reigniting debate about controlling them. The "salties", which can grow up to seven metres long and weigh more than a tonne, are a common feature of the vast continent´s tropical north and kill an average of two people a year.
  7. KARACHI/GUWAHATI: The Australian cricket team's bus came under attack while touring India, where stones were pelted after the team?s victory in their Twenty20 match against the hosts on Tuesday. Australia's T20 skipper Aaron Finch, member of the visiting team, posted a photo of the brick attack on Twitter. ?Pretty scary having a rock thrown through the team bus window on the way back to the hotel!!,? he tweeted. Captain David Warner, who was also on the bus, during the incident, retweeted Aaron's tweet. Earlier, Australia defeated India convincingly in the second T20 International in Guwahati to level the series 1-1. This is undoubtedly a grave security breach that questions BCCI as well as the security of the host nation. Ironically, just prior the incident, Harsha Bhogle tweeted: "Been around Indian cricket for a while but I haven't seen the kind of adulation I see in Indore, in Ranchi and especially here in Guwahati," the commentator said.
  8. SYDNEY: The World Solar Challenge began on Sunday with 42 solar cars crossing Australia?s tropical north to its southern shores, a gruelling 3,000 km (1,864 mile) race through the outback. The race from the northern city of Darwin to the southern city of Adelaide is expected to take a week for most cars, with speeds of 90-100 kmh (55-62 mph) powered only by the sun. The fastest time was achieved by Japan?s Tokai University in 2009, completing the transcontinental race in only 29 hours and 49 minutes. Belgian team Punch Powertrain started first on Sunday after recording a trial time of 2:03.8 for 2.97 km (1.78 miles), hitting an average speed of 83.4 kmh (51.5mph). But reigning 2015 champions Nuon from Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands believes it has a good chance of retaining the prize. ?All the cars look completely different (this year), and all we know is we?ve got a good car, we?ve got it running perfectly the last couple of days and we?re confident we?re going to do everything to win,? tour manager Sarah Benninkbolt said Sunday. Race director Chris Selwood said the biennial event has attracted one of the best fields ever, with teams from more than 40 countries. ?This is the 30th anniversary of the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge and competitors want to be part of that. They have been drawn to the challenge of new regulations which reduced the solar array size without limiting the size of the solar car,? Selwood said. Teams come from countries including the United States, Japan, Germany, Chile, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Malaysia, Belgium, Sweden, Iran, South Korea, India, Hong Kong, South Africa, Poland, Thailand, Turkey, Canada, Taiwan and Australia. The Northern Territory Minister for Tourism and Culture, Lauren Moss said her government?s A$250,000 (US$194,150) sponsorship of the race showed it was committed to achieving 50 percent renewable energy for the territory by 2030. ?Innovation is at the heart of the event and the technology showcased this year will influence continuing solar innovation for vehicles and householders in the future,? she said. ?This event is a great promotion for the NT ? it shows our ability to innovate to the world.?
  9. [embed_video1 url=http://stream.jeem.tv/vod/25db3caa4cee42dff1a857afbf1aa0ea.mp4/playlist.m3u8?wmsAuthSign=c2VydmVyX3RpbWU9MTAvOC8yMDE3IDY6MTM6MjEgUE0maGFzaF92YWx1ZT1mUVE0TEJDMXV4WWk1KzFORnlCZUFnPT0mdmFsaWRtaW51dGVzPTYwJmlkPTE= style=center] SYDNEY: The World Solar Challenge began on Sunday with 42 solar cars crossing Australia?s tropical north to its southern shores, a gruelling 3,000 km (1,864 miles) race through the outback. The race from the northern city of Darwin to the southern city of Adelaide is expected to take a week for most cars, with speeds of 90-100 kmh (55-62 mph) powered only by the sun. The fastest time was achieved by Japan?s Tokai University in 2009, completing the transcontinental race in only 29 hours and 49 minutes. Belgian team Punch Powertrain started first on Sunday after recording a trial time of 2:03.8 for 2.97 km (1.78 miles), hitting an average speed of 83.4 kmh (51.5mph). But reigning 2015 champions Nuon from Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands believes it has a good chance of retaining the prize. ?All the cars look completely different (this year), and all we know is we?ve got a good car, we?ve got it running perfectly the last couple of days and we?re confident we?re going to do everything to win,? tour manager Sarah Benninkbolt said Sunday. Race director Chris Selwood said the biennial event has attracted one of the best fields ever, with teams from more than 40 countries. The Nuon Solar Team from the Netherlands with their NUNA9 car as the World Solar Challenge begins at Parliament House in Darwin. Photo: EPA ?This is the 30th anniversary of the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge and competitors want to be part of that. They have been drawn to the challenge of new regulations which reduced the solar array size without limiting the size of the solar car,? Selwood said. Teams come from countries including the United States, Japan, Germany, Chile, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Malaysia, Belgium, Sweden, Iran, South Korea, India, Hong Kong, South Africa, Poland, Thailand, Turkey, Canada, Taiwan and Australia. The Northern Territory Minister for Tourism and Culture, Lauren Moss said her government?s A$250,000 (US$194,150) sponsorship of the race showed it was committed to achieving 50 percent renewable energy for the territory by 2030. ?Innovation is at the heart of the event and the technology showcased this year will influence continuing solar innovation for vehicles and householders in the future,? she said. ?This event is a great promotion for the NT ? it shows our ability to innovate to the world.?
  10. Remember those ‘charpais' that our grandparents used to rest on? These traditional beds are still quite prevalent in the rural areas of the country, and all the dhabas. And, even though they have become a rare sight in the cities, it seems like these extremely desi items have become quite a craze among foreigners. Our very desi ‘charpia' is going places, literally! An Australian guy recently posted an ad to sell a charpai, but it's not just any charpia, it's a very fancy ‘charpoy' that costs a whopping AUS $990! That's around Rs. 50,000, fyi. Here is the ad: © Twitter There is nothing that this guy can offer that will convince any Indian to buy a ‘charpia' for â¹Rs. 50,000. Nothing! It obviously caught everyone's eye on Twitter, and immediately started going viral. We didn't even see it coming. Chai Tea was bad, you thought? Ha! Here comes the Charpoy Cot. (That price makes my head reel). I need to go lie down on my own charpoy cot. pic.twitter.com/Yw2V5ju96R — charukesi (@charukesi) October 4, 2017 What a business idea! If this is real #Indians can mint money in #Australia selling our old stuff - #Charpoy #CaneFurniture #Mora #ClothesHorses #ClayUtensils ... pic.twitter.com/fnRaFuhdcI — mainakde (@mainakde) October 5, 2017 The price tag even influenced a new abbreviation. ROCL! Rolling On Charpoy Laughing ððð $990! pic.twitter.com/8PEWbDdBBR — Яøÿ (@MixedRaita) October 4, 2017 Shame on us. Wow! how they sell it in Australia! 990 Australian dollars is â¹50,500/- & here we forgot it for modernity's sake#Charpoy #Horasu #Baazala pic.twitter.com/hNfFvhlOfl — समà¥à¤°: दà¥à¤¸à¤¾à¤ (@gavyasudha) October 5, 2017 Good point, though. Why do we alwyz need gora thappa on our own things 2 b recognized?haldiwala doodh ke baad now khatiya became imported foreign returned ðð https://t.co/gf2h7sYsT3 — Netra Daoo (@onlyonenetra) October 5, 2017 So much hypocrisy. While Indians are made to feel ashamed of rural lifestyle, many others have started to appreciate & use "Datun", "Dona" & now "Charpoy". pic.twitter.com/w2k4Wk8nCe — Ashima Singh ð®ð³ (@AshiQuotes) October 5, 2017 You have to be really stupid to pay that much for a ‘charpai'. Earlier, we used khatiya only, one and all, now mostly seen in dhabas. Only a madman will spend Rs 65,000 on a single khatiya or charpai. pic.twitter.com/AsFZUkJKuQ — Shivendra Kishore Si (@ShivendraKisho2) October 5, 2017 It's international, now. Our desi 'khatiya' going places ð pic.twitter.com/t3rAlEhyXr — shalini (@shals15) October 5, 2017 Do you? Do you know the importance of your à¤à¤à¤¿à¤¯à¤¾? pic.twitter.com/EGNlHlW3Xh — à¤à¤®à¤¿à¤¤ शà¥à¤°à¥à¤µà¤¾à¤¸à¥à¤¤à¤µ (@AmiSri) October 5, 2017 We can just go to Australia and sell one these to get an iPhone. I never knew that I had these gold, expensive than Iphone 7, all this time and I m just thinking of selling my kidney... ð — Azar Umais (@umaisazar) October 5, 2017 Basically. Bloody hell! pic.twitter.com/nBiC3yfn6J — omar r quraishi (@omar_quraishi) October 5, 2017
  11. An adult female Dryococelus australis ? also known as the Lord Howe Island stick insect that was once declared extinct ? is shown in this undated photo released on October 5, 2017. Courtesy Rohan Cleave/Melbourne Zoo/Handout via REUTERS WASHINGTON: When black rats invaded Lord Howe Island after the 1918 wreck of the steamship Makambo, they wiped out numerous native species on the small Australian isle in the Tasman Sea including a big, flightless insect that resembled a stick. But the Lord Howe Island stick insect, once declared extinct, still lives. Scientists said on Thursday DNA analysis of museum specimens of the bug and a similar-looking one from an inhospitable volcanic outcrop called Ball?s Pyramid 23 kilometres (14 miles) away confirmed they are the same species. The finding could help pave the way for its reintroduction in the coming years. ?The Lord Howe Island stick insect has become emblematic of the fragility of island ecosystems. Unlike most stories involving extinction, this one gives us a unique second chance,? Alexander Mikheyev ? an evolutionary biologist at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University in Japan ? said. The glossy-black insect that grows up to six inches (15 cm) in length is nicknamed the ?land lobster.? Other stick insects are found around the world, so named because their appearance lets them blend in with trees and bushes to evade predators. As adults, the wingless Lord Howe Island stick insects shelter in trees during daytime and come out at night to eat shrubbery. The bright-green babies are active during daytime. By about 1930, they had vanished on Lord Howe Island, which was thought to be their only home. There were no land-dwelling mammals there after the arrival of rats, who also vanquished five bird species and 12 other insect species. A rock-climbing ranger made a curious discovery in 2001 on Ball?s Pyramid: a similar-looking insect. Since then, captive breeding programs have begun at the Melbourne Zoo and elsewhere. Because of certain differences between the Ball?s Pyramid insects and the Lord Howe Island insect museum specimens, there was some question about whether they were the same species. ?We found what everyone hoped to find, that despite some significant morphological differences, these are indeed the same species,? said Mikheyev, who led the research published in the journal Current Biology. Officials are planning a program to eradicate the invasive rats on Lord Howe Island, which could allow the stick insects to return. ?I imagine that maybe a decade from now, people will travel to Lord Howe Island and take night walks, hoping to glimpse this insect,? Mikheyev said. ?In maybe 20 years, they could become a ubiquitous sight.?
  12. Photo: AFL Twitter The Richmond Tigers shrugged off decades of frustration to win their 11th Australian Football League championship and first in 37 years with a 48-point trouncing of the Adelaide Crows in the Grand Final in Melbourne on Saturday. Trailing by 10 points after the opening quarter, the Tigers piled on seven unanswered goals to tear the game open and roared on to a 16.12 (108) to 8.12 (60) victory in front of a festive crowd of 100,021 at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. The Tigers´ talismanic midfielder Dustin Martin capped his brilliant season by winning the Norm Smith medal as the most valuable player on the ground. The 26-year-old, who was awarded the Brownlow medal as the ´best and fairest´ player of the season, finished with 28 possessions and two goals in Australian Rules football´s showpiece match. The Crows, bidding for their first championship since back-to-back titles in 1997-98, were the dominant side of the regular season and entered the match as the bookmakers´ favourites. But after starting brightly with four goals in the first quarter, they promptly crumbled under pressure, their forwards completely shut down by their opponents´ superb defence. "It´s been an incredible year and I´ve just loved working alongside you all," Tigers captain Trent Cotchin told his team at the post-match trophy presentation. "A massive thank you to our fans and members. You deserve this." The Damien Hardwick-coached Tigers won their first championship since Tony Jewell´s side lifted the 1980 trophy with victory over the Collingwood Magpies.
  13. In an attempt to address several key issues in the game, the International Cricket Council (ICC) recently introduced some drastic changes to the rules in cricket. Implemented from 28 September, the fresh alterations in regulations range from limiting bat sizes to fielding restrictions. While there has already been a long debate about some of the new regulations, the 'fake fielding' clause has already found its first victim in an Australian domestic team. © Reuters The ongoing JLT Cup - a limited-overs cricket tournament - provided one of the first instances where the new rule pertaining to on-field play was put into practice by the umpires. The new rule was introduced to prevent 'fake fielding' which often creates doubts in the minds of batsmen that could lead to their dismissals. Playing in the JLT Cup clash between Queensland Bulls and the Cricket Australia (CA) XI on Friday, Marnus Labuschagne's error saw the umpired adding five additional runs to CA XI's total for his 'fake fielding'. The incident occurred in the 27th over of CA XI's innings when Labuschagne dove to his right and failed to stop the ball which was hit in his direction by batsman Param Uppal. The Queensland Bulls fielder had visibly failed to collect the ball, but as the batsmen were scurrying for a run, he faked to have stopped it and gestured throwing it towards the wickets. CA XI batsman Clint Hinchliffe got alarmed and increased his pace to complete the run, only to realise that Labuschagne had faked the throw. © Twitter/@qldcricket The umpire were quick to spot the mistake - a violation of rules - and immediately signalled the scorers to add five more runs to CA XI's total, despite Labuschagne's apology. The Queensland Bulls were charged five penalty runs according to the new ICC rule of ‘intentionally deceiving or distracting a batsman'. While the new rule will now be seen taking a toll on fielding violations - courtesy ICC, it was already implemented in Australian cricket even before the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) introduced their updated laws on the game earlier this year.
  14. An Australian blogger who faked brain cancer and professed to have cured the disease with natural therapies was fined Aus$410,000 (US$320,000) on Thursday over the false claims. The Federal Court in Melbourne found that Belle Gibson deceived people when she launched a popular cookbook and smartphone app in 2013 asserting she overcame cancer through alternative treatments, including Ayurvedic medicine and a gluten-free diet. In 2015 she confessed to an Australian magazine that she lied about the diagnosis. It also emerged that she failed to make donations she had publicly pledged to charity. "If there is one theme or pattern which emerges through her conduct, it is her relentless obsession with herself and what best serves her interests," Justice Debra Mortimer said in handing down the fine for misleading and deceptive conduct. Gibson, 25, who did not attend the hearing, made some Aus$420,000 from her book and a popular social media business, promising much of the earnings to charity. Mortimer said people bought her app as they incorrectly believed profits were going to a good cause. In one of "the most serious" instances Gibson promised a week's earnings to a family whose child had a brain tumour. "She did this to encourage members of the public to buy her product (The Whole Pantry app), to generate income for herself and her company, and generally to promote herself and her commercial activities," the judge said. "She consciously chose to use the terminal illness of a little boy in this way."
  15. A manhunt has begun for the killer of a giant saltwater crocodile in Australia, as authorities warned its death would trigger more aggressive behaviour among younger crocs in the area. The carcass of a 5.2-metre (17-foot) adult male was found in the Fitzroy River in central Queensland on Thursday with a single gunshot wound to the head, the environment department said. "It is illegal to 'take' and kill a crocodile without authority and police will work closely with (the environment department) to locate the person responsible," Queensland police said. Under the state's conservation laws, the maximum penalty for the unlawful killing of a crocodile is Aus$28,383.75 (US$22,530). The incident sparked warnings about heightened aggression among younger crocodiles in the wake of the giant predator's death. "People need to clearly understand the death of this animal has changed the balance of the crocodile population in the Fitzroy," the environment department's diversity operations director Michael Joyce told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. "And we can expect increased aggressive activity by younger male crocodiles. That's because they will be competing to take the dominant position which is now vacant." Joyce said. "He is a crocodile that does spend a fair bit of time controlling the river and controlling the young animals that are in the river." Joyce added that he didn't think the crocodile had posed a problem but rather, was "an important part of our ecosystem". Saltwater crocodile numbers have exploded since they were declared a protected species in the 1970s, with recent attacks reigniting debate about controlling them. The "salties", which can grow up to seven metres long and weigh more than a tonne, are a common feature of the vast continent's tropical north and kill an average of two people a year.
  16. India's favourite foodie duo, Rocky & Mayur, recently visited the Land Down Under for an offbeat vacation, as part of their new adventure series, titled ‘Rocky & Mayur's Offbeat Australia'. And when they came back, they had a lot of dope to share with us about how to visit these 5 cities in Australia which offer offbeat experiences that are just as thrilling as the more commercially popularized ones. On their itinerary were the cities of Northern Territory, South Australia, New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia. Following the map, the globe-trotting pair began their journey from Melbourne, the capital of Victoria. And here's everything they tried and suggest you do, too! 1. Victoria © Fitzroy Known to many as a sophisticated European looking city, Melbourne is dominated by trams and colonial style buildings. To begin the city's tour, you can visit Fitzroy, which offers an alternative to Melbourne's general formal side. Filled with vintage stores and second-hand book shops, the city is Melbourne's art hub. The by lanes of Fitzroy offer some of the best street art and the graffiti ranges from political in nature, beauty or simple strange and full of people's vivid imagination. © Dolphin Watching at Queens Next, head to Queens' cliff, a small town on the south side of Victoria. Here, one can enjoy a bright day in a nice boat, alongside Dolphins in the sea. To end your Victorian escapade, visit Great Ocean Road, one of the most scenic coastal drives. The two highlights our visit to the city included visit 12 Apostles and Zip lining through the treetops of Otway. Take a chopper to get a bird's-eye view of the city. Adrenaline junkies can also Zip-line through the treetops of Otway and enjoy the tranquility of the forests. © The 12 Apostle Grand Pacific 2. New South Wales/Sydney Head to the capital of New South Wales and attend Vivid Sydney, an annual event which of light, music and ideas! It features some of the most breath-taking installations and projects at the Opera House and Harbour Bridge. © Bridge Climbing in Sydney Swimming, boating and surfing are passé! Rosebay in Sydney offers a great opportunity to try paddle-boarding, one of the fastest growing sports in the world. For budding photographers, Grand Pacific Road offers a must-visit destination, with lush rainforests and seaside villages. Trust us, this is not one to miss! © Paddle Boarding in Sydney We recommend ending your NSW visit with some whale-watching! With over 35 vantage points to spot these large mammals, you have the freedom to choose the location that suits you best. The Sea Cliff Bridge along the Grand Pacific can be your choice for the activity. A beautiful combination of the large sea expanse and the chance to spot migrating whales will not leave you disappointed! © Quad Biking, NT 3. Queensland/Brisbane ‘Not so brisk' Brisbane can be the next destination on your itinerary. Noosa offers the ultimate skydiving experience over the Sunshine Coast. Next, you can visit the Maleny Botanical Gardens and Bird World while in Brisbane. A beautiful spot overlooking the Glasshouse Mountains, this aviary and garden is surrounded by a beautiful rainforest. Get up close and friendly with macaws, cockatoos, finches and lovebirds at this aviary. When you're tired of the cooing and cawing, take a walk through the various pathways lined with roses, orchids, azaleas, native shrubs and colourful blossoms of every variety. © Eagle Spotting After satisfying your green thumbs, you should head on to the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary. With over 130 koalas, you will have a ball observing, holding and playing with these cute lazy creatures. This, along with hand-feeding kangaroos and looking at Tasmanian devils, will surely be the highlight of your visit! Kangaroo Point in Brisbane is a hub for exploring the vertical world and taking in breath-taking views of beautiful Brisbane. Challenge yourself to Abseiling here, because the end result is definitely worth it! © Spending Time With Kangaroos End your Queensland trip with Steve Irwin's Zoo. How can anyone miss the Crocodile Hunter's 100 acre zoo? Housing more than just crocs and gators, the zoo is home to elephants, giraffes, reptiles, kangaroos, wombats, koalas and cheetahs. Surrounded by the Glass House Mountains, the drive off the highway is a photographer's dream. © Koalas in Brisbane 4. Northern Territory Gliding around the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park on the Segway is definitely the way to go if you want to learn more about this World Heritage listed destination and Anangu (local Aboriginal) people, their way of life and their culture. © Segway Uluru You must make it a point to check out the Field of Lights, while at NT. At sunset, Uluru is lit up. From crimson to lavender, the lights turn on, one by one. An artist, Bruce Munro, installed 50,000 lights on the desert of Uluru; creating a constellation on the floor of the Australian desert. © Yubu Napa, NT Visit the Yubu Napa Art Gallery in Alice Springs and get a first-hand account of the inspiring stories by local artists. You should also opt for a hot air balloon ride over Alice Springs- the view of the landscape will leave you completely mesmerised! The Desert Park in NT will give you the chance to encounter Wedge-tailed Eagles intimately and walk among the natural habitat of Australia's most famous Red Kangaroos. Conclude your adventure with a quad bike ride at the rich and rugged terrain of the King's Canyon. © Hot Air Balloon Ride 5. South Australia/Adelaide End your Aussie experience with Adelaide, one of the more picturesque towns in Australia; also known as the city of churches. © Adventure Park in Adelaide Cricket enthusiasts can start by paying homage to their favourite sport at the Adelaide Oval, which is the home to the South Australian Cricket Association. The tour guide will also let you in on some of the secrets of the cricket ground. Next, you can head to Kangaroo Island to get a peek into Australia's most pristine beaches, amazing wildlife, lush forests and fresh gourmet food. Test your set of skills at the Little Sahara while trying your hands (well, legs) at sand boarding down the dunes! End your day with a barbeque in a bush-camp. © Field of Light And finally, end your trip with a bang at The Mega Adventure Aerial Park in West Beach, which will leave you with memories of a lifetime.
  17. Australia are playing their first Test series in Bangladesh since Ricky Ponting´s team visited in 2006 SYDNEY: Cricket Australia insisted Tuesday it is comfortable with security in Bangladesh following an incident in which a window on the team bus was smashed. CA said the window was broken by a "small rock or stone" as Australia´s players were returning to the team hotel after Monday´s opening day in the second Test in Chittagong. No one was injured. "En route back to the hotel last night a window on the Australian team bus was broken. No one was injured in the incident," CA´s security manager Sean Carroll said in a statement. "Team security personnel are currently in discussion with local authorities while they investigate the cause, which is believed to have come from a small rock or stone. "Bangladesh authorities are taking the incident seriously and security has been increased on the route." CA added that it was "happy with security measures that have been in place and we are comfortable with the response from the Bangladesh authorities and the increased security presence we have been provided in light of the incident". Australia are playing their first Test series in Bangladesh since Ricky Ponting´s team visited in 2006. They were due to play two Tests in Bangladesh in October 2015 but the tour was cancelled amid security fears after attacks by extremists in the country.
  18. source: BBC SYDNEY: A koala at an Australian zoo has given birth to a rare white joey, staff announced Tuesday. Handlers at the Australia Zoo on Queensland's Sunshine Coast say the pale animal born in January owes its white fur to a recessive gene inherited from mother Tia. The mother has given birth to light-coloured joeys in the past. "In veterinary science it?s often referred to as the 'silvering gene' where animals are born with white or very pale fur and, just like baby teeth, they eventually shed their baby fur and the regular adult colouration comes through," said the zoo's wildlife hospital director Rosie Booth in a statement. Koala fur differs in colour - from light grey to brown - depending on their environment. Animals in the south of Australia tend to have thicker and darker fur than those in the north. But a white koala is incredibly rare, Booth said, and "quite unfortunate" if born in the wild, since it is more visible to predators. The much-loved koala has been under increasing threat across Australia in recent decades, particularly from habitat loss, disease, dog attacks and bushfires. The joey is yet to be named and Tourism Australia is set to encourage suggestions.
  19. Australian Olympic icon Betty Cuthbert, the only athlete to ever win gold in the 100m, 200m, and 400m, has died aged 79 after a long battle with multiple sclerosis, officials said on Monday. Cuthbert shot to fame as a little-known 18-year-old at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics, winning the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay, earning her the nickname "Golden Girl" by local media. She suffered a hamstring injury at the Rome Games four years later and briefly retired, before being coaxed back to the track to win the 400m at the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo. During her career, she set nine world records, four of them in 1958, and remains the only athlete, male or female, to win Olympic gold in the 100m, 200m and 400m. Swimmer Ian Thorpe is the only Australian to claim more Olympic gold medals, with five. "Betty was the Golden Girl of the track and a national heroine," said Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates. "It's very sad to lose such a great champion. Betty battled her illness for many years and showed tremendous courage, but more importantly she always managed to smile." Athletics Australia president Mark Arbib called her "inspiring". "She is the only athlete, male or female, to win Olympic gold in the 100m, 200m and 400m, with her trophy cabinet also including three medals from the Commonwealth Games," he said. "She will be forever remembered as a legend of the sport and a trailblazer for our female athletes." Born in Sydney, she moved to West Australia in later life after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1969, which confined to a wheelchair. She returned to the spotlight in 2000 when she took part in the ceremony to light the cauldron at the Sydney Olympic Games. Cuthbert was an inaugural member of the Athletics Australia Hall of Fame and she was inducted into the IAAF Hall of Fame in 2012. "Rest in peace Betty Cuthbert -- an inspiration and a champion on and off the track," tweeted Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, while fellow track legend Cathy Freeman said: "Thank you for the inspirational memories, Betty Cuthbert."
  20. SYDNEY: Australian police said two men have been charged over terror-related offences involving plans to place an improvised explosive device on a passenger jet flight leaving Sydney, and, separately, to build a device to release poisonous gas. Australian Federal Police Deputy Commissioner National Security Michael Phelan told a media conference on Friday that the men had assistance from Islamic State in Syria over the plot targeting an Etihad Airways flight. The explosive device was taken to Sydney's airport but the plan was aborted and the bomb did not breach airport security, he said. "This is one of the most sophisticated plots that has ever been attempted on Australian soil," Phelan said. "The explosive was a high-end explosive...I don't want to be specific because it's still under examination for the exactness of it, but high military grade explosive." Phelan said in a separate event, the same men attempted to create an improvised chemical device, although he said there was no evidence to suggest that would be used in a plane attack. Police arrested four men last weekend in raids across Australia's biggest city of Sydney. One man has been released while another is being held without charge under special counter-terror laws. Etihad said this week it was assisting police with its investigation.
  21. Students pictured outside University of New South Wales in Australia/AAP SYDNEY: More than half of university students in Australia were sexually harassed last year and seven percent sexually assaulted on at least one occasion, a "disturbing" new national study revealed Tuesday. The findings came in an Australian Human Rights Commission report, conducted on behalf of the country´s 39 universities that questioned more than 30,000 students, after years of activism by women´s groups to discover the extent of the problem. Women were three times as likely as men to be sexually assaulted and almost twice as likely to be sexually harassed, either on-campus, travelling to and from the university or at off-campus events endorsed by the institution. "The unavoidable conclusion of the data... is that incidents of sexual assault and sexual harassment are occurring at unacceptable rates at Australian universities," said *** Discrimination Commissioner Kate Jenkins. "While anybody can experience sexual assault or sexual harassment, it is clear from the data that women at university experience these behaviours at disproportionately higher rates than men. "This adds weight to the body of evidence that highlights disturbing rates of sexual violence against women in Australia." The report said almost a third of the harassment occurred on university grounds or in teaching spaces, while one in five of the assaults happened at a university or residence social event. Australian universities, which have more than one million pupils enrolled, are hugely popular with international students, particularly from China and India. Many of those affected -- including international students -- did not formally report the incident, with the vast majority saying their university did not do enough to provide clear direction on what to do and where to seek support. "It broke my heart to read this report," Sophie Johnston, from the National Union of Students, told reporters. "This is a cultural battle we are fighting everywhere." The report made nine recommendations, including the need to change attitudes and behaviour and to ensure an independent and systemic review of how universities respond. Universities Australia, the body representing the country´s university sector, immediately announced a 10-point plan to tackle the issue. This included a 24/7 support line, new training for staff to recognise and deal with the problem, and a commitment to a follow-up survey to track progress. "We send a strong and clear message today that these behaviours are not acceptable. Not on our campuses -- and not in Australian society," Universities Australia chair Margaret Gardner said. "We have listened, and we will act."
  22. Victorian MP Khalil Eideh. Photo taken from Herald Sun An MP from Australian state of Victoria, Khalil Eideh, was recently blocked from entering the United States while on an overseas study tour, in yet another incident of ?Trumpism?, as declared by an outraged Australian senator. Eideh, who was born in Lebanon and whose family is Syrian, was part of a group of MPs studying the effectiveness of drug laws and regulations in Europe and North America. But he was left ?exhausted, very, very disappointed [and] frustrated? when authorities blocked him from entering the US, just as he was about to fly from Vancouver, Canada to Denver, Colorado. ?[They gave me] no explanation whatsoever, at first they couldn't find my name. When I gave them my itinerary they said 'ah yes, unfortunately it's blocked and we can't take you on the plane',? he was quoted as saying by Australian media. The MP holds joint citizenship of Australia and Syria ? the latter being on the list of countries targeted by US President Donald Trump's travel restrictions. ?One of the ministers was saying it could be because of the Trump decision ? Syria is included in these countries. I'm not sure if that's the reason,? he said. Federal Labor senator Kim Carr said Eideh had been the "victim of Trumpism". Newlyweds en route to Hawaii honeymoon detained at LA airport ?because groom is Muslim? Couple thrown into a detention centre for 26 hours then sent back home without explanation Expressing his outrage at why an ?ally like Australia, a great military partner like Australia? could be treated this way, the senator said, ?There is absolutely an extraordinary circumstance where we have no explanation for this behaviour.? A US Customs and Border Protection official said having a valid visa did not guarantee entry into the US. ?A visa allows a traveller to knock at the door ? travel to a port of entry, airport or land border crossing and request permission to US Customs and Border Protection,? he said. ?All travellers must clear admissibility laws,? he said, adding that only a small number out of the more than 1.2 million people who came to the US each day were denied entry.
  23. Vatican finance chief Cardinal George Pell, a top advisor to Pope Francis, denied all charges of historical sexual abuse Wednesday. Photo: AFP Vatican finance chief Cardinal George Pell, a top advisor to Pope Francis, denied all charges of historical sexual abuse Wednesday at his first appearance in an Australian court over the allegations. The 76-year-old, the number-three figure in the Vatican, returned from Rome earlier this month to face the charges in Melbourne Magistrates Court. Details of the charges have not been made public although police said they involved "multiple complainants". The former Sydney and Melbourne archbishop has always maintained his innocence. Cardinal George Pell arrives under heavy police protection for his first court hearing over historical sexual abuse allegations. Photo: AFP Looking sombre and frail, he attended the hearing with his lawyer, top criminal barrister Robert Richter, who told the court his client was not guilty -- even though a formal plea was not required at this stage. "For the avoidance of doubt and because of the interest, I might indicate that Cardinal Pell pleads not guilty to all charges and will maintain the presumed innocence that he has," Richter told the court, national broadcaster ABC reported. Pell, dressed in black and wearing his clerical collar, remained silent throughout with magistrate Duncan Reynolds ruling that evidence needs to be handed to his legal team by September 8, with the next court date set for October 6. The cleric made no comment as he was escorted by a group of police through a crush of cameras, reporters and photographers into the court, which hears hundreds of cases a week for alleged crimes ranging from theft to murder. The cleric made no comment as he was escorted by a group of police through a crush of cameras, reporters and photographers into the court. Photo: AFP Several photographers were knocked over in the melee. Similar scenes greeted his departure after the brief hearing as he was ushered around 100 metres (yards) down the road to his lawyer's offices surrounded by security, with a handful of supporters shouting "this is a show trial" and "innocent" as he walked past. Protesters were also on hand, with one, Brian Cherrie, telling the Melbourne Herald Sun: "We need the truth." Rocked the church Pell was not required to attend the hearing, but Australia's most powerful Catholic opted to appear, having previously vowed to defend himself and clear his name after a two-year investigation led to him being charged on June 29. "I am innocent of these charges, they are false. The whole idea of sexual abuse is abhorrent to me," he said in Rome last month, claiming he had been the victim of a campaign of "relentless character assassination". Australia's Catholic leaders have spoken out in support, describing Pell as a "thoroughly decent man". The Archdiocese of Sydney is providing accommodation for him while he fights the charges, but it has said it will not foot his legal bills, which could run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Supporters have set up a fund to help him pay the costs, according to the Institute of Public Affairs, a high-profile conservative Australian think tank. Despite being unofficially considered the third most powerful cleric in the Vatican, no special arrangements were in place at the court. Pell entered the building through the front door and was screened by security. He has been granted a leave of absence by the Pope, who has made clear the cardinal would not be forced to resign his post as head of the Vatican's powerful economic ministry. But the scandal has rocked the church. He is the most senior Catholic cleric to be charged with criminal offences linked to its long-running sexual abuse scandal. The allegations against Pell coincide with the final stages of Australia's Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child *** Abuse, ordered in 2012 after a decade of pressure to investigate widespread allegations of institutional paedophilia. The commission has spoken to thousands of survivors and heard claims of child abuse involving churches, orphanages, sporting clubs, youth groups and schools. Pell appeared before the commission three times, once in person and twice via video-link from Rome.
  24. The police chief in Minneapolis resigned Friday amid an uproar over the death of an Australian woman who had called to report a possible sexual assault and was shot by a responding officer. Chief Janee Harteau faced criticism over her handling of the incident last Saturday night, which ignited an international outcry. She did not appear before TV cameras until Thursday, saying she had been on vacation at a remote mountain location. Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges said she asked for the chief's resignation Friday and Harteau tendered it. "I've lost confidence in the chief's ability to lead us further. And from the many conversations I've had with people around our city, especially this week, it is clear that she has lost the confidence of the people of Minneapolis as well," Hodges said in a statement. Moments later the mayor announced her nomination of Assistant Police Chief Medaria Arradondo as Harteau's replacement. Arradondo has been the public face of the department during the crisis. Many of the city's elected officials had expressed their displeasure with the police chief, and some suggested earlier Friday that they would like to remove her, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported. Damond, a 40-year-old meditation teacher and life coach, called police Saturday night after hearing noises she feared might have been those of someone getting raped. Responding officer Matthew Harrity had been startled by a loud noise just before Damond approached the police car he was driving, prompting his partner Mohamed Noor to fire the fatal shot, authorities said. The state's Bureau of Criminal Affairs (BCA), the agency investigating the shooting, said Friday that Noor continued to refuse an interview with authorities. But investigators located and interviewed a witness they had been seeking, the BCA said. The witness had been bicycling near the scene of the shooting and had stopped to watch officers provide first aid. The BCA did not disclose what the witness told investigators. Hundreds of marchers took to the streets of Damond's neighbourhood Thursday night, many carrying signs reading "Justice for Justine." Damond's family, through their attorney, said they want reforms in the police department.
  25. "You're in such good shape," Trump was filmed on Thursday telling her during his first state visit to France SYDNEY: Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop on Sunday criticised comments by US President Donald Trump on French first lady Brigitte Macron's appearance. "You're in such good shape," Trump was filmed on Thursday telling her during his first state visit to France. "I wonder if she could say the same of him?" Bishop told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, when asked whether she would be flattered or offended if the comment were directed at her. "I'd be taken aback, I think. It's a rather interesting comment to make," she said. Bishop declined further comment on the Paris remark, but added an unprompted observation on Trump's use of social media, saying she wouldn't "run a commentary on his Twitter account". The criticism follows an acrimonious January telephone call between Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, when the American hung up after 25 minutes rather than the scheduled hour, according to the Washington Post. In June, the relationship between the two countries hit the spotlight again, after the release of a leaked tape of Turnbull mocking Trump at an off-the-record media event. But the two leaders "get along great," Trump had declared in May, following his first-face-to-face meeting with Turnbull.