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Found 3 results

  1. FILE PHOTO - Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman speaks during the meeting of Islamic Military Counter Terrorism Coalition defence ministers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia November 26, 2017./ Reuters RIYADH: Saudi Arabia?s public prosecutor has said he will pursue extradition for corruption suspects living abroad as part of a two-month-old crackdown that has already netted princes and tycoons. Evidence is being collected against ?fugitives? in order to issue indictments against them and request that foreign governments return them to the kingdom, Saud al-Muajab told Arrajol magazine in an interview published on Thursday. It was not clear how many people are being targeted, or in which countries. Saudi security forces have rounded up dozens of members of the political and business elite, holding them in Riyadh?s opulent Ritz Carlton hotel on the orders of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. The move was billed as a war on rampant corruption but also widely seen by analysts as helping Prince Mohammed consolidate his grip on power after ousting his cousin as heir to the throne in the summer. Saudi officials are negotiating settlements with detainees, saying they aim to claw back some $100 billion of funds that rightfully belong to the state. Muajab said last month that most detainees had agreed to settlements in order to avoid prosecution while the rest could be held for several more months. He told Arrajol that those who end up in court will be permitted to hire lawyers to defend them during the investigation and trial phases.
  2. LONDON: Indian tycoon Vijay Mallya appeared in a London court on Monday to start his fight against extradition to his homeland, where he is accused of fraud. Mallya, chairman of the UB Group drinks conglomerate and chief executive of the Force India Formula One team, appeared in the dock at Westminster Magistrates Court, after facing a media scrum outside. He left India in March 2016 owing more than $1 billion after defaulting on loan payments to state-owned banks and allegedly misusing the funds. The loans from the state-owned IDBI bank were intended to bail out his failed carrier Kingfisher Airlines. The opening of the case was delayed by an hour due to a fire alert. The court complex was evacuated, leaving Mallya wandering around outside, surrounded by a rolling media scrum at every turn. Wearing a blue pinstripe suit and smoking a cigar, he declined to answer persistent questions but said: "The allegations are baseless, unfounded, deliberate and you will see our submissions in court." The case is being heard by England's Chief Magistrate Emma Arbuthnot, who handles the most complex extradition cases. "The focus of our case is on his conduct, how he misused the banks," said lawyer Mark Summers, representing the Indian authorities as he began setting out their case in the hearings, which are expected to last for at least eight days. He told the court that Kingfisher Airlines had been incurring losses and was forced to defer payments to its creditors. It sought loans in October 2009 and hoped to emerge from the global financial crisis as a profitable venture. "This was an airline in trouble at this stage, which is why it was seeking financial assistance from a large number of banks," for large amounts of money, said Summers. Mallya's lawyers were expected to begin their defence on Tuesday before witnesses give evidence to the court. Known for his lavish lifestyle, Mallya made Kingfisher beer a global brand. He stepped down as the director of the Indian Premier League cricket team Royal Challengers Bangalore last year. His financial dealings are being investigated by the federal Central Bureau of Investigation and the Enforcement Directorate, a financial crimes agency. Mallya was once known as the "King of Good Times" but dropped off India's most wealthy list in 2014, engulfed by Kingfisher Airlines´ massive debts. He has been living in a sprawling $15 million (13 million euro) mansion in southeast England but has denied absconding.
  3. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (C) and Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim (R) attend a ceremony marking the 95th anniversary of Victory Day at the mausoleum of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, Ankara, August 30, 2017. AFP/Adem Altan MADRID: A Turkish-born German writer facing extradition from Spain to Turkey, which accuses him of "terrorism", on Wednesday urged Madrid not to send him to a country that is "slipping towards fascism". Dogan Akhanli ? who has lived in Germany since 1991 ? was arrested August 19 while on holiday in Granada in southern Spain, on the basis of an Interpol "red notice" from Turkey, in a case that has further strained German-Turkish relations. Turkish authorities accuse the 60-year-old writer of "terrorism", his lawyer Gonzalo Boye said. Berlin protested and a Madrid court freed Akhanli on August 20 but ordered him to stay in Spain and report to the authorities weekly, while Turkey has 40 days to send a formal extradition request. "How can they consider deporting me to Turkey, a country that is slipping towards fascism, when Spaniards themselves must have learned from history what this means for mankind," he said at a Madrid news conference, referring to Franco dictatorship in Spain from 1939 to 1975. Germany has dismissed the case against Akhanli as politically motivated, and Chancellor Angela Merkel warned President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's government not to "misuse" Interpol to pursue its critics. Akhanli said he believed Turkey ordered his arrest because "I express myself out loud, and because I write books about the Armenian genocide and the rights of the Kurds", Turkey's largest ethnic minority group. He has angered the Turkish government by writing about the World War I-era mass killings and deportation of up to 1.5 million Armenians under the Ottoman empire. Many historians and western nations, including Germany, consider the events a genocide ? a term forcefully rejected by Turkey. Turkey acknowledges that large-scale massacres took place but says that they were perpetrated in self-defence against what it calls a Russian-inspired uprising by Armenians. Akhanli grew up in Istanbul and was jailed from 1985 to 1987 in the aftermath of a military coup. He emigrated to Germany in 1991, where he was granted political asylum, and in 2001 he became a German citizen. On a return trip to Turkey in 2010, Akhanli was again arrested, accused of heading a terrorist organisation and having taken part in a deadly 1989 robbery. After several months in detention, a court cleared him and he left Turkey, but the ruling was overturned in 2013. Akhanli argues that the accusations against him are made up. Any country can issue an Interpol "red notice", roughly equivalent to an international arrest warrant, but extradition by Spain would follow only if Ankara can convince Spanish courts it has a solid case against him. Boye ? Akhanli's lawyer ? accused Spanish authorities of granting extraditions too easily. He said that Madrid extradited three people to Turkey in 2014, three in 2015, and five in 2016. "The numbers speak for themselves," Boye said.