News Ticker
  • “We cannot expect people to have respect for law and order until we teach respect to those we have entrusted to enforce those laws.” ― Hunter S. Thompson
  • “And I can fight only for something that I love
  • love only what I respect
  • and respect only what I at least know.” ― Adolf Hitler
  •  Click Here To Watch Latest Movie Jumanji (2017) 

Welcome to Funday Urdu Forum

Guest Image

Welcome to Funday Urdu Forum, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information for you to signup. Be apart of Funday Urdu Forum by signing in or creating an account via default Sign up page or social links such as: Facebook, Twitter or Google.

  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.
  • Upload or Download IPS Community files such as:  Applications, Plugins etc.
  • Upload or Download your Favorite Books, Novels in PDF format. 

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'missile'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Help Support
    • Announcement And Help
    • Funday Chatroom
  • Poetry
    • Shair-o-Shaa'eri
    • Famous Poet
  • Islam - اسلام
    • QURAN O TARJUMA قرآن و ترجمہ
    • AHADEES MUBARIK آحدیث مبارک
    • Ramazan ul Mubarik - رمضان المبارک
    • Deen O Duniya - دین و دنیا
  • Other Forums
    • Chitchat and Greetings
    • Urdu Adab
    • Entertainment
    • Common Rooms
  • Music, Movies, and Dramas
    • Movies Song And Tv.Series
  • Science, Arts & Culture
    • Education, Science & Technology
  • IPS Community Suite
    • IPS Community Suite 4.1
    • IPS Download
    • IPS Community Help/Support And Tutorials

Blogs

  • Ishq_janoon_Dewanagi
  • Uzee khan
  • Beauty of Words
  • Tareekhi Waqaiyaat
  • Geo News Blog
  • The Pakistan Tourism
  • My BawaRchi_KhaNa
  • Mukaam.e.Moahhabt
  • FDF Members Poetry
  • Sadqy Tmhary
  • FDF Online News
  • Pakistan
  • Dua's Kitchen
  • Raqs e Bismil
  • HayDay Game

Categories

  • Books
    • Urdu Novels
    • Islamic
    • General Books
  • IPS Community Suite 4
    • Applications
    • Plugins
    • Themes
    • Language Packs
    • IPS Extras
  • IPS Community Suite 3.4
    • Applications
    • Hooks/BBCodes
    • Themes/Skins
    • Language Packs
    • Miscellaneous XML Files
  • XenForo
    • Add-ons
    • Styles
    • Language Packs
    • Miscellaneous XML Files
  • Web Scripts
  • PC Softwares

Categories

  • Articles

Categories

  • Records

Calendars

  • Community Calendar
  • Pakistan Holidays

Genres

  • English
  • New Movie Songs
  • Old Movies Songs
  • Single Track
  • Classic
  • Ghazal
  • Pakistani
  • Indian Pop & Remix
  • Romantic
  • Punjabi
  • Qawalli
  • Patriotic
  • Islam

Categories

  • Islam
  • Online Movies
    • English
    • Indian
    • Punjabi
    • Hindi Dubbed
    • Animated - Cartoon
    • Other Movies
    • Pakistani Movies
  • Video Songs
    • Coke Studio
  • Mix Videos
  • Online Live Channels
    • Pakistani Channels
    • Indian Channels
    • Sports Channels
    • English Channels
  • Pakistani Drama Series
    • Zara Yaad ker
    • Besharam (ARY TV series)
  • English Series
    • Quantico Season 1
    • SuperGirl Season 1
    • The Magicians
    • The Shannara Chronicles
    • Game of Thrones

Found 75 results

  1. An electronic sign reads ?There is no threat? in Oahu after a false emergency alert that said a ballistic missile was headed for Hawaii. Photo: REUTERS HONOLULU: An alert warning of an incoming ballistic missile aimed at Hawaii was sent in error Saturday, sowing panic and confusion across the US state -- which is already on edge over the risk of attack -- before officials dubbed it a "false alarm." Emergency management officials eventually determined the notification was sent just after 8:00 am (1800 GMT) during a shift change and a drill after "the wrong button was pushed" -- a mistake that lit up phones across the archipelago with a disturbing alert urging people to "seek immediate shelter." There were frenzied scenes of people rushing to safety -- a bathtub, a basement, a manhole, cowering under mattresses. Adventurer Alison Teal called it "the worst moment of my life." The erroneous message came after months of soaring tensions between Washington and Pyongyang, with North Korea saying it has successfully tested ballistic missiles that could deliver atomic warheads to the United States, including the chain of volcanic islands. "I deeply apologise for the trouble and heartbreak that we caused today," said Vern Miyagi, administrator of Hawaii´s Emergency Management Agency. "We´ve spent the last few months trying to get ahead of this whole threat, so that we could provide as much notification and preparation to the public. "We made a mistake," he acknowledged in a press conference. "We´re going to take processes and study this so that this doesn´t happen again. "The governor has directed that we hold off any more tests until we get this squared away." As social media ignited with screenshots of the cell phone emergency warning, Representative Tulsi Gabbard quickly tweeted that it was a "FALSE ALARM," with Hawaii´s EMA confirming "there is NO missile threat to Hawaii." US military spokesman David Benham later said US Pacific Command "has detected no ballistic missile threat to Hawaii. Earlier message was sent in error." The warning -- which came across the Emergency Alert System that authorities nationwide use to delivery vital emergency information -- read: "BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL." A corrected message indicating that "there is no missile threat or danger to the state of Hawaii" was not dispatched to phones until nearly 40 minutes later. "I know firsthand that what happened today was totally unacceptable," Governor David Ige said of the alert, which was also broadcast on some local television stations. "I´m sorry for that pain and confusion that anyone might have experienced." In explaining the delay, he noted there was no automatic way to cancel the false alarm, so it had to be done manually. 'Jarring' Both the governor and Miyagi assured no single person would be capable of making such a mistake in the future, and the Federal Communications Commission said it was launching a "full investigation" into the incident. The White House said US President Donald Trump had been briefing about the incident, calling the alert "purely a state exercise." Senator Brian Schatz of Hawaii, echoing stances of outrage taken by several other of the state´s politicians, called the mistaken notification "totally inexcusable." Though the alert was quickly deemed false, many Hawaii residents heeded the nerve-wracking warning, scrambling to take refuge in hallways and basements. Teal, the adventurer and Hawaiian native, said "everyone was in a panic." "Traveling the world as an extreme adventurer, I´ve been in very scary situations from snowstorms to sharks to hot lava. Nothing as terrifying as a missile coming to kill everyone you know and love," she told AFP. Lauren McGowan, on holiday in Maui with family members and friends, was on her way to breakfast when her phone blared the alert. She and her family quickly returned to their hotel, where staff ushered them along with some 30 people to a basement cafeteria and distributed water and food. The alert and rush to shelter caused "confusion," McGowan said, particularly for the children in the group. "No one had any idea what was really going on," the 28-year-old from New York told AFP, explaining they had no cellular service underground. "It was a bit jarring for sure," she said of the experience. Andy Priest said his parents thought they would die when the warning came. "My mom started to get up to go, and my Dad told her that if it was their time to go, he wanted to be looking at the ocean and enjoying the view," he wrote on Twitter. Several golfers participating in the US PGA Tour´s Sony Open in Honolulu also reacted to the alarming episode. "Under mattresses in the bathtub with my wife, baby and in laws," American golfer John Peterson tweeted. "Please lord let this bomb threat not be real." No time for 'posturing' Tourists and residents received the false alert just one month after Hawaii tested its nuclear attack siren system. The state will conduct the drill -- the first of its kind since the Cold War era -- monthly as part of its regular siren test, an emergency management spokesperson told AFP. Trump -- who in the past has deployed bombastic rhetoric at North Korea and its leader Kim Jong-Un -- had yet to react to the false warning. The US leader recently said he would be willing to speak directly with Kim, with whom he has traded sharp words over Pyongyang´s missile and nuclear tests, raising fears of attacks. Gabbard accused Trump of "posturing" and not taking nuclear threats from North Korea seriously and urged to begin direct talks with Pyongyang without preconditions. "The people of Hawaii experienced that in 15 minutes, they and their families are going to be dead," the Democratic lawmaker said. "Gone. That´s what they just went through."
  2. WASHINGTON: An emergency alert sent on Saturday to Hawaii?s residents warning of an imminent ballistic missile attack was transmitted mistakenly by state authorities due to human error, Hawaii?s governor and emergency management chief said. State officials and the US military?s Pacific Command confirmed that there was no actual threat to the state. Governor David Ige, a Democrat, said in comments aired on CNN, ?I was awakened by the alert like everyone else here in the state of Hawaii. It was unfortunate and regrettable. We will be looking at how we can improve the procedures so it doesn?t happen again.? The alert, sent to mobile phones and aired on television and radio, was issued amid high international tensions over North Korea?s development of ballistic nuclear weapons. Ige, who apologized for the incident, said the alert was sent out by mistake during a shift change at the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency. He said such shift changes occur three times a day every day of the year. Vern Miyagi, the agency?s administrator, said in comments also aired on CNN, ?It was an inadvertent mistake. The change of shift is about three people. That should have been caught. ... It should not have happened.? The U.S. Federal Communications Commission announced it was initiating a full investigation. The FCC has jurisdiction over the emergency alert system. Earlier this week, FCC chairman Ajit Pai said the agency would vote at its January meeting to enhance the effectiveness of wireless emergency alerts, which have been in place since 2012. CHECK LIST Miyagi said there was a ?check list? that should have been followed. He said, ?I think we have the process in place. It?s an matter of executing the process. I think it?s human error.? ?This will not happen again,? he added. Media reports said it took 38 minutes for the initial alert to be corrected. After the alert was sent, the Emergency Management Agency later said on Twitter: ?NO missile threat to Hawaii.? A spokeswoman for US Representative Tulsi Gabbard said the congresswoman checked with the state agency that issued the alert and was told it was sent in error. Gabbard then tweeted, ?HAWAII - THIS IS A FALSE ALARM. THERE IS NO INCOMING MISSILE TO HAWAII. I HAVE CONFIRMED WITH OFFICIALS THERE IS NO INCOMING MISSILE.? Gabbard also tweeted the mistaken alert, which stated: ?EMERGENCY ALERT BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.? North Korean President Kim Jong-un has threatened to unleash his country?s growing missile weapon capability against the U.S. territory of Guam or U.S. states, prompting President Donald Trump to threaten tough actions against Pyongyang, including ?fire and fury.? Trump was wrapping up a round of golf at Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida when the incident was unfolding. White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said Trump was briefed and that it ?was purely a state exercise.? Hawaii State Representative Matt LoPresti, described his family?s reaction upon receiving the alert, adding that ?someone should lose their job if this was an error.? ?We took shelter immediately ... in the bathtub with my children, saying our prayers,? LoPresti told CNN. ?I was wondering why we couldn?t hear the emergency sirens. I didn?t understand that. And that was my first clue that maybe something was wrong, whether a hack or an error. But we took it as seriously as a heart attack,? LoPresti added. Hawaii, a chain of islands in the Pacific Ocean, has a population of about 1.4 million people, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, and is home to Pacific Command, the Navy?s Pacific Fleet and other elements of the American military. In November, Hawaii said it would resume monthly statewide testing of Cold War-era nuclear attack warning sirens for the first time in at least a quarter of a century, in preparation for a possible missile strike from North Korea, state officials said at the time. US Senator Mazie Hirono, a Democrat from Hawaii, said on Twitter, ?At a time of heightened tensions, we need to make sure all information released to the community is accurate. We need to get to the bottom of what happened and make sure it never happens again.? The US Navy base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, was the target of the surprise attack by Japan on Dec. 7, 1941, that drew the United States into World War Two.
  3. RIYADH: Saudi Arabia on Friday intercepted a ballistic missile over the kingdom's south near the border with Yemen, state media reported, hours after Yemeni rebels said they had launched an attack. The Houthi rebels, locked in a war against Yemen's Saudi-backed government, said they had fired a missile at the kingdom's southwestern province of Najran in a statement tweeted by their Al-Masirah television channel. Saudi air defences intercepted the ballistic missile over Najran, according to the kingdom's state-owned Al Ekhbariya news channel. A spokesman for the Saudi-led military alliance fighting the Houthis in Yemen did not immediately respond to a request for further details. Saudi Arabia, which has been targeted by multiple rocket attacks in recent weeks, has blamed its regional rival Iran for arming the Houthis in the Yemen war. The kingdom denounced the threat of "Iranian-manufactured ballistic weapons" after it intercepted a ballistic missile fired from Yemen over Riyadh in December. No casualties have been reported in the attacks. The Saudi-led coalition intervened in support of President Abedrabbo Mansur Hadi's government in March 2015, after the Huthis took over the capital Sanaa and much of the rest of the country. But despite the coalition's superior firepower, the rebels still control the capital and much of the north. More than 8,750 people have been killed since the coalition intervened, according to the World Health Organization.
  4. [embed_video1 url=http://stream.jeem.tv/vod/b0db40c5b8c73a0e59b86e2dbdb7f453.mp4/playlist.m3u8?wmsAuthSign=c2VydmVyX3RpbWU9MS8zLzIwMTggMjoxMTozMiBQTSZoYXNoX3ZhbHVlPUZWUUY0bkxSVTlMZ2kzUVA5eEpPRUE9PSZ2YWxpZG1pbnV0ZXM9NjAmaWQ9MQ== style=center] KARACHI: The Pakistan Navy (PN) on Wednesday tested the indigenously developed Harbah naval cruise missile after launching it from the newly commissioned Fast Attack Craft (Missile) PNS Himmat, said a statement from the PN. Harbah is a surface to surface missile with land attack capability. "The missile accurately hit its target signifying the impressive capabilities of Harbah Naval Weapon System," said the PN statement. "The successful live weapon firing has once again demonstrated the credible firepower of Pakistan Navy and the impeccable level of indigenisation in high tech weaponry achieved by Pakistan's defence industry." Chief of naval staff on the occasion expressed his utmost satisfaction on the operational readiness of the PN fleet units and commended efforts of all those involved. Admiral Zafar Mahmood Abbasi also appreciated the efforts made by the engineers and researchers in making the Harbah weapon system project a success.
  5. WASHINGTON/MOSCOW: The United States announced sanctions on two North Korean officials behind their country?s ballistic missile program on Tuesday, while Russia reiterated an offer to mediate to ease tensions between Washington and Pyongyang. The new US steps were the latest in a campaign aimed at forcing North Korea ? which has defied years of multilateral and bilateral sanctions ? to abandon a weapons program aimed at developing nuclear-tipped missiles capable of hitting the United States. The US Treasury named the officials as Kim Jong Sik and Ri Pyong Chol. It said Kim was reportedly a key figure in North Korea?s efforts to switch its missile program from liquid to solid fuel, while Ri was reported to be a key official in its intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) development. ?Treasury is targeting leaders of North Korea?s ballistic missile programs, as part of our maximum pressure campaign to isolate (North Korea) and achieve a fully denuclearized Korean Peninsula,? Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement. The largely symbolic steps block any property or interests the two might have within US jurisdiction and prohibit any dealings by U.S. citizens with them. The move followed new United Nations sanctions announced last Friday in response to North Korea?s Nov. 29 test of an ICBM that Pyongyang said put all of the US mainland within range of its nuclear weapons. Those sanctions sought to further limit North Korea?s access to refined petroleum products and crude oil and its earnings from workers abroad. North Korea declared the UN steps to be an act of war and tantamount to a complete economic blockade. The standoff between the US and North Korea has raised fears of a new conflict on the Korean peninsula, which has remained in a technical state of war since the 1950-53 Korean War ended in an armistice, not a peace treaty. Washington has said that all options, including military ones, are on the table in dealing with North Korea. It says it prefers a diplomatic solution, but that North Korea has given no indication it is willing to discuss denuclearization. Kremlin offer On Tuesday, the Kremlin, which has long called for the two sides to hold negotiations, said it was ready to act as a mediator if the US and North Korea were willing for it to play such a role. ?Russia?s readiness to clear the way for de-escalation is obvious,? Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters. Asked to comment on the offer, a spokesman for the US State Department, Justin Higgins, said the US ?has the ability to communicate with North Korea through a variety of diplomatic channels". ?We want the North Korean regime to understand that there is a different path that it can choose, however it is up to North Korea to change course and return to credible negotiations," he added. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, who made a similar offer on Monday, told US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in a phone call on Tuesday that ?Washington?s aggressive rhetoric? and beefing up of its military presence in the region had heightened tensions and was unacceptable, Russia?s foreign ministry said. It said Lavrov underscored the need for ?the fastest move to the negotiating process from the language of sanctions.? Another State Department spokesman, Michael Cavey, said Washington remained open to talks, but the onus was on North Korea ?to take sincere and meaningful actions toward denuclearization and refrain from further provocations.? He said North Korea had ?made clear through its words and actions it is not interested in dialogue at this stage.? South Korea?s Unification Ministry forecast on Tuesday that North Korea would look to open negotiations with the United States next year while continuing to seek recognition as a de facto nuclear power. Washington has stressed the need for all countries, especially Russia, and China ? North Korea?s main trading partner ? to fully implement sanctions, including by cutting off oil supplies. According to Chinese customs data, China exported no oil products to North Korea in November, apparently going above and beyond UN sanctions imposed earlier this year. Beijing also imported no North Korean iron ore, coal or lead in November, the second full month of those trade sanctions, the data showed. Beijing has not disclosed its crude exports to North Korea for several years but industry sources say it still supplies about 520,000 tonnes, or 3.8 million barrels, a year to the country via an ageing pipeline. North Korea also sources some of its oil from Russia. Trade between North Korea and China has slowed through the year, particularly after China banned coal purchases in February. Chinese exports of corn to North Korea in November also slumped, down 82 percent from a year earlier to 100 tonnes, the lowest since January. Exports of rice plunged 64 percent to 672 tonnes, the lowest since March. China has expressed concern about the humanitarian effects of sanctions and has repeatedly called for constructive efforts to ease tensions.
  6. WASHINGTON: The United States on Tuesday announced sanctions on two North Korean officials for their roles in developing the country?s ballistic missiles, the latest step in a campaign to press Pyongyang to give up its nuclear and missile programs. The US Treasury named the officials as Kim Jong Sik and Ri Pyong Chol. It said Kim was reportedly a key figure in North Korea?s efforts to switch its missile program from liquid to solid fuel, while Ri was reported to be a key official involved in the country?s intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) development. ?Treasury is targeting leaders of North Korea?s ballistic missile programs, as part of our maximum pressure campaign to isolate (North Korea) and achieve a fully denuclearized Korean Peninsula,? Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement. ?These actions follow Friday?s United Nations Security Council Resolution, which imposed strong new sanctions on North Korea further shutting down its ability to raise illicit funds.? The U.N. Security Council imposed new sanctions on North Korea last week over a recent ICBM test. The sanctions sought to limit the country?s access to refined petroleum products and crude oil and its earnings from workers abroad. North Korea, which has been working to develop nuclear-tipped missiles capable of hitting the United States, declared those steps to be an act of war and tantamount to a complete economic blockade against the country.
  7. People look towards the north through a barbed-wire fence near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, in Paju, South Korea, December 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji UNITED NATIONS/SEOUL: The UN Security Council unanimously imposed new sanctions on North Korea on Friday for its November 29 intercontinental ballistic missile test, seeking to limit its access to refined petroleum products and crude oil and its earnings from workers abroad. A Security Council resolution adopted 15-0 seeks to ban nearly 90 percent of refined petroleum product exports to North Korea by capping them at 500,000 barrels a year and, in a last-minute change, demands the repatriation of North Koreans working abroad within 24 months, instead of 12 months as first proposed. The US-drafted resolution also caps crude oil supplies to North Korea at 4 million barrels a year and commits the Council to further reductions if Pyongyang were to conduct another nuclear test or launch another ICBM. North Korea on November 29 said it successfully tested a new ICBM in a ?breakthrough? that puts the US mainland within range of its nuclear weapons whose warheads could withstand re-entry into the Earth?s atmosphere. Tensions have been rising over North Korea?s nuclear and missile programs, which it pursues in defiance of years of UN Security Council resolutions, with the bellicose rhetoric coming from both Pyongyang and the White House. In November, North Korea demanded a halt to what it called ?brutal sanctions,? saying a previous round imposed after its sixth and most powerful nuclear test on September 3 constituted genocide. US diplomats have made clear they are seeking a diplomatic solution but proposed the new, tougher sanctions resolution to ratchet up pressure on North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. ?It sends the unambiguous message to Pyongyang that further defiance will invite further punishments and isolation,? Nikki Haley, the US ambassador to the United Nations, said after the vote. The North Korean mission to the United Nations did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the vote. Wu Haitao, China?s deputy UN ambassador, said tensions on the Korean peninsula risk ?spiralling out of control? and he repeated Beijing?s call for talks. ?Only by meeting each other halfway and through dialogue and consultations can a peaceful settlement be found,? he said. North Korea regularly threatens to destroy South Korea, the United States and Japan and says its weapons programs are necessary to counter US aggression. The United States stations 28,500 troops in the South, a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War. On Friday, a spokesperson for North Korea?s foreign ministry called US President Donald Trump?s recently released national security strategy the latest American policy seeking to ?stifle our country and turn the entire Korean peninsula? into an outpost of American hegemony. He said Trump was seeking ?total subordination of the whole world?. Increasing pressure Speaking before the Security Council vote, analysts said the new sanctions could have a major effect on the North?s economy. ?If they were enforced, the cap on oil would be devastating for North Korea?s haulage industry, for North Koreans who use generators at home or for productive activities, and for (state-owned enterprises) that do the same,? said Peter Ward, a columnist for NK News, a website that tracks North Korea. The forced repatriation of foreign workers would also cut off vital sources of foreign currency and investment not only for the government but also for North Korea?s emerging market economy, he said. China, which supplies most of North Korea?s oil, has backed successive rounds of UN sanctions but had resisted past US calls to cut off supplies to its neighbour. The move to curb Chinese fuel exports to North Korea may have limited impact after China National Petroleum Corp suspended diesel and gasoline sales to its northern neighbour in June over concerns it would not get paid. Business has slowed steadily since then, with zero shipments of diesel, gasoline and other fuel from China in October. November data will be released on Monday. Russia quietly boosted economic support for North Korea earlier this year, and last week Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov said Moscow was not ready to sign up to sanctions that would strangle the country economically. In a bid to further choke North Korea?s external sources of funding, the resolution also seeks to ban North Korean exports of food products, machinery, electrical equipment, earth and stone, including magnesite and magnesia, wood and vessels. It also bans exports to North Korea of industrial equipment, machinery, transportation vehicles, and industrial metals as well as subjecting 15 North Koreans and the Ministry of the People?s Armed Forces to a global asset freeze and travel ban. It also seeks to allow countries to seize, inspect, and freeze any vessel in their ports or territorial waters that they believe was carrying banned cargo or involved in prohibited activities. Even if the proposed sanctions have an economic effect, it is not clear whether that would push Pyongyang to negotiate or stop its weapons development, said Kim Sung-Han, a former South Korean vice foreign minister. ?We have had numerous ? sometimes so-called toughest ? sanctions against North Korea over the past 25 years,? he said. ?Almost none have worked effectively to halt the regime?s military and nuclear ambitions.?
  8. Huthi rebel fighter is seen in the Yemeni capital on December 4, 2017. ? AFP SANAA: The Saudi-led coalition conducted multiple air raids in Yemen on Wednesday, a day after Huthi rebels fired a ballistic missile at Riyadh in an attack Washington said was enabled by Iran. The Saudi-led strikes killed 11 civilians in the Huthi stronghold of Saada, a tribal chief and witnesses said, while unidentified assailants attacked Huthis guarding the Sanaa residence of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who was killed by the rebels earlier this month. US President Donald Trump spoke Wednesday with Saudi King Salman following the ballistic missile attack that targeted Salman?s residence. "Trump expressed solidarity with Saudi Arabia following the ballistic missile attack against King Salman?s official residence... an attack enabled by the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps," the White House said. The US and Saudi Arabia have accused Iran of supplying the Huthi rebels with the missile involved in another attack over Riyadh last month, with US ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley presenting what she called "undeniable" evidence that the missile was "made in Iran." Tehran has denied supplying ballistic missiles to the Huthis. During Wednesday?s ground operations against the Sanaa residence of Saleh, an unspecified number of Huthi guards were killed, residents said. A tribal chief told AFP that 11 civilians were killed and eight others wounded in an air strike on the Huthi rebel stronghold of Saada in northern Yemen. The pro-Huthi television channel Al-Masirah gave the same death toll and added that women and children were among those killed, while 19 people were wounded. Witnesses and a security source said other coalition air raids targeted a rebel camp south of Sanaa and a second camp to the west. The rebel-run Saba press agency said 38 people, including women and children, were killed or wounded in raids targeting different parts of Yemen. 1,000th day The Huthis said the target of Tuesday?s ballistic missile was a "large gathering of Saudi regime leaders in Yamamah Palace", where Salman later unveiled the country?s 2018 budget. An Arab national living in Saudi Arabia was arrested Wednesday for expressing support for the missile attack in a tweet, the Saudi Press Agency reported. Yemen is in the midst of a bloody war between the Huthis and pro-government forces, who were expelled from Sanaa in September 2014. Rebel chief Abdelmalik al-Huthi said Tuesday?s attack was timed to coincide with the 1,000th day of the Saudi-led intervention in Yemen?s conflict. On November 4, a missile launch from Yemen targeted Riyadh?s airport, triggering a sharp Saudi response -- the full closure of Yemen?s ports and borders that were already under an extensive blockade. At the time, the UN aid chief warned that the siege -- namely on the key rebel-held port of Hodeida -- could trigger the worst famine the world has seen in decades. The blockade was partially lifted three weeks later amid massive international pressure. The coalition issued a statement Wednesday saying it would not resort to closing Hodeida port. "The coalition leadership announces the port of Hodeida will remain open for humanitarian and relief supplies and the entry of commercial vessels, including fuel and food vessels, for a period of 30 days," said the statement, carried on the state-run Saudi Press Agency. Britain?s Prime Minister Theresa May spoke to Salman and welcomed the decision to reopen the port. "The Prime Minister strongly condemned yesterday?s attempted missile attack on the Yamama Palace in Riyadh, and welcomed the restraint shown by Saudi Arabia in the face of unacceptable Huthi aggression," Downing Street said in a statement. Coalition spokesman Turki al-Maliki, speaking at a news conference in Riyadh, described the continuing missile fire as a "serious escalation." Maliki said that since the coalition intervened in Yemen in March 2015, over 80 ballistic missiles had been fired at Saudi Arabia and that the alliance had killed more than 11,000 Huthi rebels. Hadi terms for dialogue Saudi Arabia and America have accused Iran of being behind the missile attacks on Riyadh. Tehran again denied the charge Wednesday, saying it has "no arms link with Yemen". Yemen?s President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi on Tuesday raised the bar for dialogue with the Huthis, saying they must surrender their weapons before the start of any peace talks. "We do not have a partner with whom we can reach peace," the exiled president said at a meeting with a number of ambassadors. Hadi issued stern conditions for dialogue: the restoration of his government to power; the surrender of Huthi arms; and the handover of state institutions. More than 8,750 people have been killed since Saudi Arabia and its allies joined the government?s fight against the rebels, triggering what the UN has called the world?s worst humanitarian crisis.
  9. MOSCOW: Russia said Thursday that it had completed negotiations with Turkey for the sale of an S-400 air defence missile system, with delivery scheduled for late 2019. "Practically speaking, the contract is entering the phase of realisation," said Vladimir Kozhin, a presidential aide who oversees matters of military cooperation. "All parameters, all technologies, the entire deal has been agreed." "All aspects have been resolved over the past few days," Kozhin said. "The contract will consist of two parts financially: part of it will be paid by Turkey and part through a credit provided by Russia." "The first deliveries are likely to begin at the end of 2019, beginning of 2020," Kozhin was reported as saying by Russian news agencies. Russia's President Vladimir Putin and his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan had discussed the deal during Putin's visit to Ankara last week. The agreement to purchase the latest Russian surface-to-air missile defence batteries is Turkey's most significant deal with a non-NATO military supplier and comes amid strained relations between Ankara and several Western countries. The deal has been valued at about $2 billion according to reports. Turkey's decision to buy the Russian system has raised eyebrows of other NATO members, with the Pentagon saying previously that "generally it´s a good idea" to buy equipment that is inter-operable with the military alliance´s other systems. Besides Turkey, Russia is also in talks to sell the system to Saudi Arabia, with Kozhin saying Thursday that both sides were aiming to finalise the remaining issues on that contract before the end of the year.
  10. People inspect damage at the site of air strikes in the northwestern city of Saada. -AFP SANAA: The Saudi-led coalition carried out a string of air raids Wednesday in Yemen, killing 11 civilians in the Houthi stronghold of Saada a day after the rebels fired a missile at Riyadh, a tribal chief and witnesses said. On the ground, unidentified assailants attacked Houthis guarding the Sanaa residence of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who was killed by the rebels earlier this month. An unspecified number of Houthi guards died in the attack, residents said. The tribal chief told AFP that 11 civilians were killed and eight others wounded in an air strike on the Houthi rebel stronghold of Saada in northern Yemen. The pro-Houthi television channel Al-Masirah gave the same death toll and added that women and children were among those killed, while 19 people were wounded. Witnesses and a security source said other coalition air raids targeted a rebel camp south of Sanaa and a second camp to the west. The rebel-run Saba press agency said 38 people, including women and children, were killed or wounded in raids targeting different parts of Yemen. The raids followed a missile attack by the Houthi rebels on Tuesday against the Saudi capital. Saudi Arabia said it "intercepted and destroyed" the missile. Anniversary missile The Houthis said "the target of the ballistic missile was a large gathering of Saudi regime leaders in Yamamah Palace", where King Salman - hours later - unveiled the country´s 2018 budget. Yemen is in the midst of a bloody war between the Houthis and pro-government forces, who were expelled from Sanaa in September 2014. Rebel chief Abdelmalik al-Houthi said Tuesday's attack was timed to coincide with the 1,000th day of the Saudi-led intervention in Yemen´s conflict. People inspect damage at the site of air strikes in the northwestern city of Saada. -AFP It was the second ballistic missile to target the heart of Riyadh in less than two months. The first failed attempt on November 4 triggered a sharp Saudi response - the full closure of Yemen's ports and borders that were already under an extensive blockade. At the time, the UN aid chief warned that the siege - namely on the key rebel-held port of Hodeida - could trigger the worst famine the world has seen in decades. The blockade was partially lifted three weeks later amid massive international pressure. The coalition issued a statement Wednesday saying it would not resort to closing Hodeida port. "The coalition leadership announces the port of Hodeida will remain open for humanitarian and relief supplies and the entry of commercial vessels, including fuel and food vessels, for a period of 30 days," said the statement, carried on the state-run Saudi Press Agency. Hadi terms for dialogue Saudi Arabia and its ally the United States have accused Iran of being behind the missile attacks on Riyadh. Tehran denied the charge on Wednesday, saying it has "no arms link with Yemen". Yemen's President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi on Tuesday raised the bar for dialogue with the Houthis, saying they must surrender their weapons before the start of any peace talks. "We do not have a partner with whom we can reach peace," the exiled president said at a meeting with a number of ambassadors. Hadi issued stern conditions for dialogue: the restoration of his government to power; the surrender of Houthi arms; and the handover of state institutions. More than 8,750 people have been killed since Saudi Arabia and its allies joined the government´s fight against the rebels, triggering what the UN has called the world´s worst humanitarian crisis.
  11. ISLAMABAD: The Foreign Office on Wednesday condemned the ballistic missile attack by Yemen's Houthi rebels on Saudi Arabia, said a statement released. The rebels on Tuesday had fired a ballistic missile at Riyadh and had claimed the target was the official residence of the Saudi king. Pakistan also reaffirmed its support for the kingdom and reiterated that in case of any violation of its territorial integrity or any threat to the Holy Cities, Pakistan will stand shoulder to shoulder with the government and people of Saudi Arabia. The FO in its statement said the increasing frequency and ferocity of the missile attacks, targeted at innocent civilians by Houthi rebels, pose a threat to regional peace and security and is therefore, highly condemnable. Saudi says it intercepted Yemen rebel missile over Riyadh Houthi rebels claim the target was the official residence of King Salman The statement further added that to ensure stability and peace in the region, a political solution for the Yemen crisis needs to be sought. "Pakistan stands firmly with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in confronting terrorism in all its forms and manifestations." "Missile force announces the launch of a Burkan (Volcano) H-2 missile against the Yamamah Palace in Riyadh," the Houthis's official news outlet Al-Masirah tweeted on Tuesday. The attacks, which could further escalate a military campaign by a Saudi-led coalition against the rebels, underscore how the raging Yemen conflict is increasingly spilling across the border. The first attack targeted Riyadh international airport on November 4, and triggered the tightening of a long-standing Saudi-led blockade of Yemen -- already on the verge of famine.
  12. US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaking after a session of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) at the United Nations headquarters in New York City, US, August 29, 2017. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/Files UNITED NATIONS: US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said a missile fired by Yemen?s Houthi group toward Saudi Arabia on Tuesday ?bears all the hallmarks of previous attacks using Iranian-provided weapons? as she pushed the UN Security Council to act. Saudi air defences shot down the ballistic missile and there were no reports of casualties or damage. In contrast, a UN human rights spokesman said coalition air strikes had killed at least 136 noncombatants in war-torn Yemen since December 6. Saudi-led forces, backing Yemen?s government, have fought the Iran-allied Houthis in Yemen?s more than two-year-long war. Iran has denied supplying the Houthis with weapons, saying the US and Saudi allegations are ?baseless and unfounded?. ?We must all act cooperatively to expose the crimes of the Tehran regime and do whatever is needed to make sure they get the message. If we do not, then Iran will bring the world deeper into a broadening regional conflict,? Haley told the council. Haley said she was exploring, with some council colleagues, several options for pressuring Iran to ?adjust their behaviour?. However, Haley is likely to struggle to convince some members, like veto powers Russia and China, that UN action is needed. Russia?s Deputy UN Ambassador Vladimir Safronkov told council on Tuesday, ?We need to abandon the language of threats and sanctions and to start using the instruments of dialogue and concentrate on broadening cooperation and mutual trust.? Most sanctions on Iran were lifted at the start of 2016 under the nuclear deal brokered by world powers and enshrined in a UNSC resolution. The resolution still subjects Tehran to a UN arms embargo and other restrictions that are technically not part of the nuclear deal. Haley said the UNSC could strengthen the provisions in that resolution or adopt a new resolution banning Iran from all activities related to ballistic missiles. Under the current resolution, Iran is ?called upon? to refrain from work on ballistic missiles designed to deliver nuclear weapons for up to eight years. Some states argue that the language of the resolution does not make it obligatory. ?We could explore sanctions on Iran in response to its clear violations of the Yemen arms embargo,? Haley said. ?We could hold the IRGC (Iran?s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps) accountable for its violations of numerous Security Council resolutions.? A separate UN resolution on Yemen bans the supply of weapons to Houthi leaders and ?those acting on their behalf or at their direction?.
  13. Missile launch from Yemen. -AFP/File RIYADH: Saudi Arabia said it shot down a ballistic missile Tuesday over Riyadh fired from Yemen by Houthi rebels who announced that the target was the official residence of King Salman. Saudi Arabia and the United States have accused Iran of supplying weapons to the insurgents, and Riyadh described the latest missile as "Iranian-Houthi". An AFP correspondent in Riyadh heard a loud explosion at 1050 GMT, shortly before the scheduled unveiling of the Saudi budget, which is usually announced by the king from the Yamamah palace, his official residence. "The missile was aimed at populated residential areas in the Riyadh area, and - thank God - was intercepted and destroyed south of Riyadh without any casualties," the official Saudi Press Agency quoted a spokesman for the Saudi-led coalition against the Huthis as saying. "The possession of Iranian-manufactured ballistic weapons by terrorist organisations, including the Iran-backed Houthi militia, is a threat to regional and international security," Turki al-Maliki added. It was the second missile fired by the Houthis - who seized the Yemeni capital in 2014 - at Riyadh in the past two months. "Missile force announces the launch of a Burkan (Volcano) H-2 missile against the Yamamah Palace in Riyadh," the rebels´ official news outlet Al-Masirah tweeted. The attacks, which could further escalate a military campaign by a Saudi-led coalition against the rebels, underscore how the raging Yemen conflict is increasingly spilling across the border. The first attack targeted Riyadh international airport on November 4, and triggered the tightening of a long-standing Saudi-led blockade of Yemen -- already on the verge of famine. 'Big bang' Saudi Arabia angrily accused its arch-foe Iran of supplying the missile to the rebels, a charge Tehran strongly denied. On Thursday, US ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley presented what she called "undeniable" evidence that last month's missile was "made in Iran". But her comments went beyond the findings of a UN investigation which reached no firm conclusion on whether the missile came from an Iranian supplier, saying only that it had a "common origin" to some Iranian designs. The coalition, which accuses the rebels of being a proxy for Iran, says the blockade is needed to stop the flow of arms to the Huthis from Tehran. Residents in the Saudi capital reported hearing a loud explosion and seeing smoke after Tuesday´s attack. "I was in my office when I heard a big bang," said Tomas Kompikan, one of the many foreign workers in Riyadh. "Suddenly after around 30 to 45 seconds I heard a next sound... and we saw a white smoke." The Houthi rebels last month warned that they considered "airports, ports, border crossings and areas of any importance" in Saudi Arabia, as well as its ally the United Arab Emirates, as legitimate targets. More than 8,750 people have been killed since Saudi Arabia and its allies joined the government´s fight against the Houthis in 2015, triggering what the UN has called the world's worst humanitarian crisis. The air strikes have intensified since the December 4 killing of ex-president Ali Abdullah Saleh at the hands of the Houthis after his alliance with the rebels collapsed. At the same time, forces of the Saudi-backed Yemeni government have stepped up attacks on the rebels and last week retook the Red Sea town of Khokha. A medical source in Yemen said Tuesday that 23 Houthi fighters had been killed in clashes with Saudi-backed government forces over the past day in Hodeida province on the Red Sea coast. A military source said at least 14 pro-government fighters were killed in the same period. The rebels were trying to recapture territory lost to government forces in the past week, including Khokha, according to another military source. Abdul Rahman Hajri, a pro-government commander, said loyalist forces "foiled the attack".
  14. US ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said Thursday that a missile fired by Huthi militants at Saudi Arabia last month had been made in Iran. Photo: AFP file WASHINGTON: US ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said Thursday that a missile fired by Huthi militants at Saudi Arabia last month had been made in Iran. "It was made in Iran then sent to Huthi militants in Yemen," Haley said of the missile. "From there it was fired at a civilian airport with the potential to kill hundreds of innocent civilians in Saudi Arabia."
  15. Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov looks on at the start of two days of closed-door nuclear talks at the United Nations offices in Geneva October 15, 2013. REUTERS/file MOSCOW: Russia said on Saturday it was fully committed to a Cold War-era pact with the United States banning intermediate-range cruise missiles, a day after Washington accused Moscow of violating the treaty. The US State Department said on Friday Washington was reviewing military options, including new intermediate-range cruise missile systems, in response to what it said was Russia?s ongoing violation of the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. The warning was the first response by President Donald Trump?s administration to US charges first leveled in 2014 that Russia had deployed a ground-launched cruise missile that breaches the pact?s ban on testing and fielding missiles with ranges of 500-5,500 kms (310-3,417 miles). Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said those allegations were ?absolutely unfounded?. ?They are not supported by the technical characteristics of the launch installation which allegedly does not comply with the treaty, or by flight telemetry data. Nothing. And it is understandable why - because it simply does not exist,? he said in written comments published by the foreign ministry. Echoing previous Russian statements, Ryabkov said Moscow was fully committed to the treaty, had always rigorously complied with it, and was prepared to continue doing so. ?However, if the other side stops following it, we will be forced, as President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin has already said, to respond in kind,? he added. The US allegation has further strained relations between Moscow and Washington, and the State Department on Friday hinted at possible economic sanctions over the issue. Washington has already sanctioned Russian entities and individuals, including people close to Putin, for Moscow?s 2014 seizure of Crimea from Ukraine and its alleged interference in the 2016 US presidential election. The Kremlin has repeatedly denied interfering in the election. Ryabkov said the ?attempts to frighten us with sanctions? were laughable. ?It?s time for American politicians and diplomats to understand that economic and military pressure on Russia will not work,? he said.
  16. A Russian serviceman walks past Russian Iskander-M missile launchers before a rehearsal for the Victory Day parade ? with the Moscow International Business Center also known as "Moskva-City" seen in the background ? at a range in Moscow, Russia, May 5, 2016. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov/Files WASHINGTON: The United States is reviewing military options, including new intermediate-range cruise missile systems, in response to what it says is Russia?s ongoing violation of a Cold War-era pact banning such missiles, the State Department said on Friday. Washington is prepared ?to cease such research and development activities? if Russia returns to compliance with the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a statement. Nauert also hinted at possible economic sanctions, saying the United States is ?pursuing economic and military measures intended to induce the Russian Federation to return to compliance.? The warning was the Trump administration?s first response to US charges first levelled in 2014 that Russia had deployed a ground-launched cruise missile that breaches the pact?s ban on testing and fielding missiles with ranges of 500-5,500 kilometres (310-3,417 miles). US officials have said the Russian cruise missile is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead, and that Moscow has refused to hold in-depth discussions about the alleged breach. Russia has denied it is violating the accord. In a statement issued before Nauert?s, the Russian foreign ministry said it was ready for talks with the United States to try to preserve the treaty and would comply with its obligations if the United States did. In a statement marking the 30th anniversary of the treaty between the US and the Soviet Union, the ministry said Moscow considered ?the language of ultimatums? and sanctions unacceptable. The US allegation has further strained relations between Moscow and Washington. US and Russian officials are to discuss the issue at a meeting in coming weeks of the special commission that oversees the treaty, said a US official, who requested anonymity. In the US statement, Nauert said the US ?remains firmly committed to the INF Treaty and continues to seek the Russian Federation?s return to compliance?. ?The administration firmly believes, however, that the United States cannot stand still while the Russian Federation continues to develop military systems in violation of the treaty,? she said. The US spokeswoman did not disclose the US economic measures under consideration to secure Russian compliance with the treaty but offered some details on the military measures. These, she said, involve a review of ?military concepts and options? that include researching new ground-launched conventional cruise missile systems. ?This step will not violate our INF Treaty obligations,? Nauert said. ?We are also prepared to cease such research and development activities if the Russian Federation returns to full and verifiable compliance with its INF Treaty obligations.? Her statement came a week after Congress sent to President Donald Trump for signing a fiscal 2018 defence policy bill authorizing $58 million to develop a new INF-busting road-mobile conventional cruise missile and US defences against the Russian weapon. The bill also called on Trump to submit to Congress a plan to impose US sanctions on Russians responsible for ?ordering or facilitating non-compliance? with the treaty. It was unclear when Trump would sign the bill. The US already has sanctions on Russian entities and individuals ?including people close to President Vladimir Putin ? for Moscow?s 2014 seizure of Crimea from Ukraine and its alleged interference in the 2016 presidential election. Moscow denies that it interfered with the election. A senior administration official, speaking recently on condition of anonymity, said the administration wanted to preserve the INF Treaty rather than rip it up. ?If we took the Russian approach, we?d all sort of say happy things about what a nice treaty we have and we would both go about violating it secretly,? said the senior administration official. ?But that?s not how we roll. It?s because we like arms control when it?s done properly.?
  17. ISLAMABAD: The Foreign Office on Friday expressed concern at the reported ballistic missile attack by Yemen's Houthi rebels on Saudi Arabia, said a statement released. "It strongly condemns the attack and commends the timely action by Saudi forces to destroy the missile preventing any loss of lives," said the FO. Pakistan reiterated its full support and solidarity with the government and the people of the kingdom. The statement further added that it condemns any threats aimed Saudi Arabia and demanded the "anti-Government forces in Yemen to desist from attacks against the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia". On Thursday, Yemen's Houthi rebels said they fired a ballistic missile at Saudi Arabia and hit a military target, in the second such attack this month, after threatening to retaliate over a crippling blockade. "We confirm the success of our ballistic missile trial, which hit its military target inside Saudi Arabia," the Houthi-run Al-Masira television channel said. Hours earlier in a speech broadcast on Al-Masira, rebel chief Abdulmalik al-Houthi had warned against "prolonging the blockade" imposed on Yemen following a November 4 rebel missile attack that was intercepted near Riyadh international airport. "Should the blockade continue, we know what (targets) would cause great pain and how to reach them," he said. Saudi Arabia and its allies tightened the longstanding blockade on Yemen's ports and the main international airport in Sanaa in the wake of the November missile attack. The move prompted the Houthis to warn that they considered "airports, ports, border crossings, and areas of any importance" in Saudi Arabia, as well as its ally the United Arab Emirates, legitimate targets. The conflict has claimed more than 8,600 lives since the Saudi-led coalition joined the government's war against the rebel alliance. More than 2,000 people have also died of cholera this year. The United Nations (UN) has warned Yemen faces mass famine unless the Saudi-led coalition allows more food aid into the country, long the poorest in the region. The coalition allowed limited supplies into select areas in Yemen last weekend. Yemen's conflict ? which has enabled Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and Daesh to flourish in the chaos of war ? shows no sign of waning. The Houthi-Saleh rebel alliance has also begun to unravel, with clashes between the Houthis and fighters loyal to the former president leaving at least 14 dead on Wednesday. Violence between the two ? whose alliance first began to show cracks in August ? flared again Thursday night, localised in southern Sanaa and around the residence of two of Saleh's nephews.
  18. Houthi fighters walk in Sanaa, Yemen, November 30, 2017. AFP/Mohammed Huwais DUBAI: Yemen's Iran-backed Houthi rebels said Thursday they fired a ballistic missile at Saudi Arabia and hit a military target, in the second such attack this month, after threatening to retaliate over a crippling blockade. "We confirm the success of our ballistic missile trial, which hit its military target inside Saudi Arabia," the Houthi-run Al-Masira television channel said. A spokesman for the Saudi-led military coalition fighting the Houthi rebels in Yemen did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Hours earlier in a speech broadcast on Al-Masira, rebel chief Abdulmalik al-Houthi warned against "prolonging the blockade" imposed on Yemen following a November 4 rebel missile attack that was intercepted near Riyadh international airport. "Should the blockade continue, we know what (targets) would cause great pain and how to reach them," he said. Saudi Arabia and its allies tightened the longstanding blockade on Yemen's ports and the main international airport in Sanaa in the wake of the November missile attack. The move prompted the Houthis to warn that they considered "airports, ports, border crossings, and areas of any importance" in Saudi Arabia, as well as its ally the United Arab Emirates, legitimate targets. "We will not stand idly by ? we will seek more radical means to prevent both the tightening of the blockade and all acts aimed at starving and humiliating the people of Yemen," the rebels' political office said this month. Riyadh accuses its arch-rival Iran of arming Yemen's Houthis and, earlier this month, Saudi Arabia's powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said this "could be considered an act of war". Saudi Arabia has accused Iran of supplying the Houthis with arms. Iran's foreign ministry has denied the accusation. Rebel rift The Houthis ? a northern minority that has long complained of marginalisation ? descended on the capital Sanaa from their mountainous region in September 2014, seizing the city with little resistance. Security forces loyal to former president Ali Abdullah Saleh ? who ruled Yemen for decades until he resigned under pressure in 2012 ? joined forces with the Houthis. Together, they forced the government of President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi to flee to the main southern city of Aden and later to Riyadh. Saudi Arabia and a coalition of mainly Arab allies launched air strikes in March 2015 against the Houthis and later sent ground troops to support pro-government forces. The conflict has claimed more than 8,600 lives since the Saudi-led coalition joined the government's war against the rebel alliance. More than 2,000 people have also died of cholera this year. The United Nations (UN) has warned Yemen faces mass famine unless the Saudi-led coalition allows more food aid into the country, long the poorest in the region. The coalition allowed limited supplies into select areas in Yemen last weekend. Yemen's conflict ? which has enabled Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and Daesh to flourish in the chaos of war ? shows no sign of waning. The Houthi-Saleh rebel alliance has also begun to unravel, with clashes between the Houthis and fighters loyal to the former president leaving at least 14 dead on Wednesday. Violence between the two ? whose alliance first began to show cracks in August ? flared again Thursday night, localised in southern Sanaa and around the residence of two of Saleh's nephews.
  19. UNITED NATIONS: The United States on Wednesday called on the international community to cut all diplomatic and trade ties with North Korea -- including Chinese oil shipments to Pyongyang after a groundbreaking missile test by the pariah regime. Washington urged tough action as emergency talks on the North´s latest provocation opened in the UN Security Council -- and after US President Donald Trump derided Kim Jong-Un as a "sick puppy" and threatened "major" new sanctions. Pyongyang on Wednesday tested its third intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) -- which it claimed was capable of striking anywhere in the United States -- snapping a two-month pause in missile launches. North Korean leader Kim said the test of the Hwasong-15 weapons system had helped his country achieve the goal of becoming a full nuclear power, as the international community expressed outrage. "We call on all nations to cut off all ties with North Korea," Washington´s ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, told her fellow envoys. Haley said Trump had called Chinese President Xi Jinping and urged him to "cut off the oil from North Korea. "That would be a pivotal step in the world´s effort to stop this international pariah," she said, issuing a stern warning to Kim. "If war comes, make no mistake: The North Korean regime will be utterly destroyed," she said. ´The situation will be handled´ The UN Security Council was meeting at the request of the United States, Japan and South Korea to consider next steps after three rounds of sanctions adopted in the past year failed to push North Korea to change course. France´s UN Ambassador Francois Delattre said the council should respond with a "tightening of the sanctions" -- a move that would likely entail the adoption of a new sanctions resolution. Japanese Ambassador Koro Bessho said "the international community has to keep the pressure up." Earlier, Trump -- who had traded barbs with Kim for months -- had asked Xi to use "all available levers" to press the hermit state. "Additional major sanctions will be imposed on North Korea today. This situation will be handled!" Trump said on Twitter. So far Wednesday, no new announcements were forthcoming. Last week, Trump announced new US unilateral sanctions on Pyongyang and returned it to a US list of state sponsors of terror. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has called for "additional measures" to toughen up international sanctions, including allowing countries to intercept vessels carrying goods to and from North Korea. There are concerns in Seoul that Trump might be considering military action against the North that could trigger a full-scale war. Seoul is home to 10 million people and only about 50 kilometers (30 miles) from the border -- well within range of Pyongyang´s artillery. Historic cause North Korean state media said the missile launched Wednesday was more sophisticated than any previously tested by Pyongyang. "The ICBM Hwasong-15 type weaponry system is an intercontinental ballistic rocket tipped with super-large heavy warhead which is capable of striking the whole mainland of the US," the North´s official news agency KCNA said. State television brought out Ri Chun-Hee, a star presenter who only appears for significant developments, to announce the landmark. "Kim Jong-Un declared with pride that now we have finally realized the great historic cause of completing the state nuclear force, the cause of building a rocket power," she said. Pyongyang said the missile reached an altitude of 4,475 kilometers and splashed down 950 kilometers from its launch site. At least one Western expert said the missile´s lofted trajectory suggested an actual range of 13,000 kilometers -- enough to hit every major US city. David Wright, an arms control expert and co-director at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said the flight parameters of Wednesday´s test pointed to a missile with "more than enough range to reach Washington DC, and in fact any part of the continental United States." While Pyongyang has yet to prove its mastery of the re-entry technology required to bring a warhead back through the Earth´s atmosphere, experts believe it is at least on the threshold of developing a working intercontinental nuclear strike capability. In September, Pyongyang conducted its sixth and most powerful nuclear test and then fired an intermediate-range missile over Japan. Raft of past sanctions Over the past year, the UN Security Council has imposed biting sanctions on Pyongyang aimed at choking off revenue to its military programs. These include a ban on North Korean exports of coal, iron, lead, textiles and seafood, trade restrictions and the blacklisting of a number of North Korean entities and officials. The council has also banned the hiring of North Korean guest workers and capped oil exports, in particular from China, Pyongyang´s main trading partner. Russia called the launch "provocative" and Beijing expressed "grave concern and opposition." China once again pressed its proposal that the North stop missile and nuclear tests in exchange for a freeze of US military exercises -- a proposal Washington has repeatedly rejected. Canada said it would host a meeting of foreign ministers to discuss the North Korean threat.
  20. North Korea test fired its most advanced intercontinental ballistic yet on Wednesday, putting the US mainland within range and increasing pressure on US President Donald Trump to deal with the nuclear-armed nation. Trump, who has vowed to halt North Korea?s nuclear and missile programs, spoke with Chinese President Xi Jinping and urged Beijing to rein in its ally North Korea. North Korea said the new missile soared to an altitude of about 4,475 km (2,780 miles) - more than 10 times the height of the International Space Station - and flew 950 km (590 miles) during its 53-minute flight. It flew higher and longer than any North Korean missile before, landing in the sea near Japan. Experts said the new ?Hwasong-15? missile theoretically gave North Korea the ability to hit the US mainland, including the East Coast, although it was not clear whether it could carry a nuclear weapon. North Korea, which conducted its largest nuclear bomb test in September, has tested dozens of ballistic missiles under its leader, Kim Jong Un, in defiance of international sanctions. ?After watching the successful launch of the new type ICBM Hwasong-15, Kim Jong Un declared with pride that now we have finally realized the great historic cause of completing the state nuclear force, the cause of building a rocket power,? according to a statement read by a North Korean television presenter. Previous US administrations have failed to stop North Korea from developing nuclear weapons and a sophisticated missile program. Trump has also struggled to contain Pyongyang since he came to office in January. Trump on Wednesday again urged China to use its leverage on Pyongyang and promised more sanctions against North Korea, two strategies that have borne little fruit so far. ?Just spoke to President Xi Jinping of China concerning the provocative actions of North Korea. Additional major sanctions will be imposed on North Korea today. This situation will be handled!? Trump wrote on Twitter. In a speech in Missouri about taxes, Trump, who has traded insults with the North in the past, referred to Kim with a derisive nickname. ?Little Rocket Man. He is a sick puppy,? Trump said. China, the North?s sole major ally, has so far refrained from taking some of the most drastic steps against North Korea, such as imposing an oil embargo. White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said US sanctions would come very soon and would add ?maximum pressure on North Korea.? The latest missile was fired a week after Trump put North Korea back on a US list of countries it says support terrorism, allowing it to impose more sanctions. North Korean state media said the missile was launched from a newly developed vehicle and that the warhead could withstand the pressure of re-entering the atmosphere, which if confirmed would be an important technical advance. Kim personally guided the test and said the new launcher was ?impeccable?, state media said. He described the new vehicle as a ?breakthrough?. North Korea also described itself as a ?responsible nuclear power?, saying its strategic weapons were developed to defend itself from ?the US imperialists? nuclear blackmail policy and nuclear threat?. The UN Security Council was scheduled to meet on Wednesday to discuss the launch. When the UN Security Council ratcheted up sanctions in September on North Korea in the wake of its sixth nuclear test, it called on states to inspect vessels on the high seas, with the consent of the flag state, if they have reasonable grounds to believe the ships are carrying prohibited cargo. However, the initial US draft resolution, which was watered down to win the support of Russia and China, would have allowed a Security Council committee to designate cargo ships for non-consensual inspections and authorized states to use all necessary measures to interdict these ships on the high seas. French President Emmanuel Macron said on Wednesday he was counting on UN Security Council members China and Russia to step up sanctions on North Korea. ?I am counting a lot in particular on China and Russia in order to take the most difficult and effective sanctions,? Macron told France 24 television. Many nuclear experts say the North has yet to prove it has mastered all technical hurdles, including the ability to deliver a heavy nuclear warhead reliably atop an ICBM, but it was likely that it soon would. ?We don?t have to like it, but we?re going to have to learn to live with North Korea?s ability to target the United States with nuclear weapons,? said Jeffrey Lewis, head of the East Asia Nonproliferation Program at the Middlebury Institute of Strategic Studies. ?THREATEN EVERYWHERE? US, Japanese and South Korean officials all agreed the missile, which landed within Japan?s exclusive economic zone, was likely an ICBM. ?It went higher, frankly, than any previous shot they?ve taken, a research and development effort on their part to continue building ballistic missiles that can threaten everywhere in the world, basically,? US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters at the White House. Trump, who was briefed on the missile while it was in flight, said it did not change his administration?s approach to North Korea, which has included new curbs to hurt trade between China and North Korea. Washington has said repeatedly that all options, including military ones, are on the table in dealing with North Korea while stressing its desire for a peaceful solution. An international meeting in Canada in January is designed to produce ?better ideas? to ease tensions over Pyongyang?s nuclear and ballistic missile tests, Canadian officials said on Wednesday, although North Korea itself will not be invited. Tillerson said on Wednesday the United States has ?a long list of additional potential sanctions, some of which involve potential financial institutions, and the Treasury Department will be announcing those when they?re ready to roll those out.? US EAST COAST IN RANGE? The new Hwasong-15, named after the planet Mars, was a more advanced version of an ICBM tested twice in July, North Korea said. It was designed to carry a ?super-large heavy warhead?. Based on its trajectory and distance, the missile would have a range of more than 13,000 km (8,100 miles) - more than enough to reach Washington D.C. and the rest of the United States, the US-based Union of Concerned Scientists said. However, it was unclear how heavy a payload the missile was carrying, and it was uncertain if it could carry a large nuclear warhead that far, the nonprofit science advocacy group added. The test comes less than three months before South Korea hosts the Winter Olympics at a resort just 80 km (50 miles) from the heavily fortified border with the North. North Korea has said its weapons programmes are a necessary defence against US plans to invade. The United States, which has 28,500 troops in South Korea as a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War, denies any such intention.
  21. A South Korean soldier walks past a television news screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un approving the country´s new ICBM test, at a railway station in Seoul on November 29, 2017 - AFP ISLAMABAD: Pakistan on Wednesday expressed deep concern over the reported launch of a ballistic missile by North Korea. North Korea said it had successfully tested a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) that could reach all of the US mainland. ?Such launches constitute a violation of the UN Security Council resolutions. These steps also undermine the goals of peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula, the North-East Asia region and beyond,? said a press release by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The Foreign Office stressed that Pakistan would continue to call upon North Kora to comply with Security Council resolutions and refrain from actions which could lead to an escalation of tensions. ?In order to maintain peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula, it is vital for all relevant parties to pursue the path of dialogue and diplomacy, to reduce tensions and work towards achieving a comprehensive solution,? the press release added. The missile test, North Korea?s first since mid-September, came a week after US President Donald Trump put North Korea back on a US list of countries it says support terrorism, allowing it to impose more sanctions. North Korea has conducted dozens of ballistic missile tests under its leader, Kim Jong Un, in defiance of international sanctions. Trump has vowed not to let North Korea develop nuclear missiles that can hit the mainland United States.
  22. The day the trailer of Tamil movie 'Tik Tik Tik' was released, people couldn't hold on to their excitement for reasons people thought were obvious. First, it's being touted as India's first space film. © Sony Music Entertainment Second, amazing cinematography and visuals that can give any Hollywood movie a run for its money… © Sony Music Entertainment And third, which we feel shouldn't go unnoticed, its plot that makes no sense whatsoever, no matter how hard we try to put our brains to it. Within 5 days of its release, the trailer already has nearly 3.6 million views and we guess it's partly because people like us are watching it again and again trying to find logic that was probably lying hidden somewhere. © Sony Music Entertainment The trailer started on a really high note and there were many who found the plot strikingly similar to 'Armageddon'. The trailer begins with an asteroid hitting the Earth, particularly Chennai that spreads panic, fear and hysteria among the people. © Sony Music Entertainment We too thought that the movie will be similar to the 1988 film until the protagonist Jayam Ravi was introduced. Ravi is sent to space to destroy those asteroids that will soon hit the ground and save the world. © Sony Music Entertainment So what made the Indian Department of Defence pick Ravi? Is he one of the greatest scientists? No. Is he the best astronaut from the lot? No. He is given this pivotal job because he is a magician who can escape from any given situation. Wait, what? © Sony Music Entertainment Okay, I don't want to sound like someone who looks for logic everywhere, but on one hand when people are discussing about millions of lives at stake since an asteroid is going to hit India within a week, the best solution that the Defense team could come up with was to get a trained magician to hack into a vault to steal a missile that can destroy the asteroids. © Sony Music Entertainment Why is he asked to steal it? Because it is a 200 kilotons nuclear missile that is kept in a secure vault that actually belongs to a space station owned by some other country. And because of diplomatic reasons, they can't come to a mutual understanding with them. *Slow claps* anyone? Here's the much talked about trailer. In fact, our hero is so talented that in a micro-gravity environment, he plays chess as if it's child's play. © Sony Music Entertainment However, we also have Tamil songs like 'Inky Pinky Ponky', which will make you feel that a weird plot like this is completely normal. To refresh your memories and make your ears bleed, here's the iconic song. Too much in the name of creative freedom! But, we also have our counterparts in the west that made a whole franchise with a bunch of 'intelligent' apes ruling the planet. At least, Director Shakti Soundar Rajan is still using humans here. The makers also managed to rope in Aaron Aziz, a Singaporean actor who is largely popular in Malaysia and Singapore. © Sony Music Entertainment The makers seem to have spent gigantic amounts of money on special effects and the film's sets; and we are extremely impressed with the end result. After 'Baahubali', if there's anything that has won our hearts, it is the VFX of this movie. © Sony Music Entertainment The film also features Nivetha Pethuraj who is trained in Jiu Jitsu and kickboxing. The movie is slated for a December 22 release and we honestly can't wait for it to hit the theatres just to see how the makers manage to justify a magician goes up in space to save lives of millions of people.
  23. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects Unit 1016 of the Korean People's Army's (KPA) Air and Anti-Air Force ? honoured with the Title of O Jung Hup-led 7th Regiment ? in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang, North Korea, March 9, 2015. REUTERS/KCNA/Files SEOUL: North Korea has fired a new ballistic missile, South Korean military officials said, in the first such launch since mid-September. Here are the key steps in the development of the regime's banned weapons and nuclear programme. The beginnings, the 1970s North Korea starts working in the late 1970s on a version of the Soviet Scud-B with a range of around 300 kilometres (around 200 miles), carrying out the first test in 1984. Between 1987 and 1992 it begins developing longer-range missiles, including the Taepodong-1 (2,500 kilometres) and Taepodong-2 (6,700 kilometres). The Taepodong-1 is test-fired over Japan in 1998 but the following year Pyongyang declares a moratorium on such tests as ties with the United States improve. First nuclear test in 2006 It ends the moratorium in 2005, blaming the Bush administration's "hostile" policy, and carries out its first nuclear test on October 9, 2006. In May 2009, there is a second underground nuclear test, several times more powerful than the first. Kim Jong-Un succeeds his father Kim Jong-Il ? who dies in December 2011 ? and oversees a third nuclear test in 2013. 2016, Japanese waters reached There is a fourth underground nuclear test in January 2016, which Pyongyang claims is a hydrogen bomb. In March, Kim Jong-Un claims the North has successfully miniaturised a thermo-nuclear warhead and in April it test-fires a submarine-launched ballistic missile. On August 3, it fires, for the first time, a ballistic missile directly into Japanese-controlled waters; later that month it successfully test-fires another submarine-launched ballistic missile. There is a fifth nuclear test on September 9. 2017, Japan and Guam under threat Between February and May, the North tests a series of ballistic missiles that fall into the Sea of Japan or that it claims are exercises to hit US bases in Japan. A test on May 14 is of a "newly developed mid/long-range strategic ballistic rocket, Hwasong-12", Pyongyang says. It flies 700 kilometres before landing in the Sea of Japan. Ahead of the first meeting between South Korean President Moon Jae-In and US President Donald Trump, the North tests a rocket engine that could be fitted on to an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). The following month it says it has successfully tested an ICBM capable of reaching Alaska, a gift for the "American bastards". There is a second successful ICBM test on July 28. Hours after Trump threatens Pyongyang with "fire and fury" over its missile programme, the North says it is considering strikes near US strategic military installations in Guam. On August 29, it fires a ballistic missile over Japan that Tokyo says is an "unprecedented, serious and grave threat". Largest nuclear test yet On September 3, North Korea conducts its sixth and largest nuclear test. Monitoring groups estimate a yield of 250 kilotons, which is 16 times the size of the 15-kiloton US bomb that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945. On September 15, less than a week after the UN adopts the eighth series of sanctions, North Korea fires an intermediate-range missile over Japan, at a distance of 3,700 kilometres (2,299 miles), according to Seoul. On November 20 Washington declares North Korea a state sponsor of terrorism, a day before it heaps pressure on the hermit state by slapping it with fresh sanctions. On November 28 North Korea fires a new ballistic missile, which flies east from South Pyongan Province, the South Korean military Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) says.
  24. File North Korea fired a ballistic missile that landed close to Japan on Wednesday, the first test by Pyongyang since a missile fired over its neighbour in mid-September, officials said. North Korea launched the missile a week after President Donald Trump put North Korea back on a US list of countries that Washington says support terrorism. The designation allows the United States to impose more sanctions, although some experts said it risked inflaming tensions on the Korean Peninsula. Japan?s government estimated that the missile flew for about 50 minutes and landed in the sea in Japan?s exclusive economic zone, Japanese broadcaster NHK said. An Aug. 29 missile fired by North Korea that flew over Japan was airborne for 14 minutes. South Korea?s Joint Chiefs of Staff said Wednesday?s missile was fired from Pyongsong, a city in South Pyongan Province, at around 1817 GMT over the sea between South Korea and Japan. Minutes after the North fired the missile, South Korea?s military conducted a missile-firing test in response, the South Korean military added. The Pentagon said it had detected a ?probable? missile launch from North Korea. ?We detected a probable missile launch from North Korea. We are in the process of assessing the situation and will provide additional details when available,? Pentagon spokesman Colonel Robert Manning told reporters. Leading Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun quoted an unidentified government official as saying the missile did not cross over Japan and it fell into the Sea of Japan or on the Korean peninsula. The White House said US President Donald Trump was briefed while the missile was still in the air. South Korean news agency Yonhap, citing South Korea?s Joint Chiefs of Staff, said the missile flew to the east and the South Korean military was analysing details of the launch with the United States. US stocks pared gains after reports of the missile launch. The S&P 500 index was up half a percent in midafternoon. Two authoritative US government sources said earlier that US government experts believed North Korea could conduct a new missile test within days. After firing missiles at a rate of about two or three a month since April, North Korea paused its missile launches in late September, after it fired a missile that passed over Japan?s northern Hokkaido island on Sept. 15. The US officials who spoke earlier declined to say what type of missile they thought North Korea might test, but noted that Pyongyang had been working to develop nuclear-tipped missiles capable of hitting the United States and had already tested inter-continental ballistic missiles. Last week, North Korea denounced Trump?s decision to relist it as a state sponsor of terrorism, calling it a ?serious provocation and violent infringement.? Trump has traded insults and threats with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and warned in his maiden speech to the United Nations in September that the United States would have no choice but to ?totally destroy? North Korea if forced to defend itself or its allies. Washington has said repeatedly that all options are on the table in dealing with North Korea, including military ones, but that it prefers a peaceful solution by Pyongyang agreeing to give up its nuclear and missile programs. To this end, Trump has pursued a policy of encouraging countries around the world, including North Korea?s main ally and neighbour, China, to step up sanctions on Pyongyang to persuade it to give up its weapons programs. North Korea has given no indication it is willing to re-enter dialogue on those terms. North Korea defends its weapons programs as a necessary defence against US plans to invade. The United States, which has 28,500 troops in South Korea as a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean war, denies any such intention.
  25. A flag is pictured outside the Permanent Mission of North Korea in Geneva, Switzerland, November 17, 2017. Photo: Reuters file TOKYO/WASHINGTON: Japan has detected radio signals suggesting North Korea may be preparing another ballistic missile launch, although such signals are not unusual and satellite images did not show fresh activity, a Japanese government source said on Tuesday. After firing missiles at a pace of about two or three a month since April, North Korean missile launches paused in September, after it fired a rocket that passed over Japan?s northern Hokkaido Island. ?This is not enough to determine (if a launch is likely soon),? the source told Reuters. Japan?s Kyodo news agency reported late on Monday that the Japanese government was on alert after catching such radio signals, suggesting a launch could come in a few days. The report also said the signals might be related to winter military training by the North Korean military. North Korea is pursuing its nuclear weapons and missile programmes in defiance of UN Security Council sanctions and has made no secret of its plans to develop a missile capable of hitting the US mainland. It has fired two missiles over Japan. South Korea?s Yonhap news agency, citing a South Korean government source, also reported that intelligence officials of the United States, South Korea and Japan had recently detected signs of a possible missile launch and have been on higher alert. South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon told reporters on Tuesday there have been ?noteworthy? movements from the North since its last missile launch in mid-September, but there was no hard evidence of another nuclear or missile test. ?North Korea hasn?t been engaging in new nuclear or missile tests but recently we?ve seen them persistently testing engines and carrying out fuel tests,? said Cho at a media event in Seoul. ?But we need some more time to see whether these are directly related to missile and nuclear tests.? Asked about the media reports, Pentagon spokesman Colonel Robert Manning told reporters the United States continued to watch North Korea very closely. ?This is a diplomatically led effort at this point, supported by military options,? he said. ?The Republic of Korea and US alliance remains strong and capable of countering any North Korean provocations or attacks.? Two US government sources familiar with official assessments of North Korean capabilities and activities said that while they were not immediately familiar with recent intelligence suggesting that North Korea was preparing to launch a new missile test, the US government would not be surprised if such a test were to take place in the very near future. Other US intelligence officials noted North Korea has previously sent deliberately misleading signs of preparations for missile and nuclear tests, in part to mask real preparations, and in part to test US and allied intelligence on its activities. South Korea?s Cho said North Korea may announce the completion of its nuclear programme within a year, as it is moving more faster than expected in developing its arsenal. North Korea defends its weapons programmes as a necessary defence against US plans to invade. The United States, which stations 28,500 troops in South Korea, a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean war, denies any such intention.