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Found 18 results

  1. Shoaib, a resident of Gujrat, was found in possession of gold jewellery worth over Rs20 million LAHORE: Customs authorities on Saturday seized 4 kilogrammes of gold from a passenger travelling from Manchester at the Allama Iqbal International Aiport. Shoaib, a resident of Gujrat, was found in possession of gold jewellery worth over Rs20 million, authorities said. 20kg heroin seized from PIA plane at Islamabad airport Sources said the drugs were hidden in the plane's catering cabin He has been taken into custody by the customs authorities for questioning.
  2. A screen shows the schedule times of United at Newark International airport in New Jersey, US, November 15, 2012. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz/Files WASHINGTON: The US government told United Continental Holdings Inc it would not face fines after a 69-year-old man was dragged from a flight in April, a US official said on Wednesday, a decision that was criticized by a passenger rights groups. The Transportation Department notified United of its decision in a May 12 letter made public on Wednesday by passenger advocacy group Flyers Rights. A government official confirmed the authenticity of the letter, which said United did not comply with all aspects of the government?s rules on overselling seats. In April, a video went viral on social media of David Dao being dragged from a United aircraft at Chicago?s O?Hare International Airport after he refused to give up his seat to make room for a crew member. United said in a statement on Wednesday ?this incident should never have happened and we are implementing all of the improvements we announced in April, which put the customer at the center of everything we do.? The incident drew attention to the practice of ?bumping? whereby airlines deny passengers access to flights after deliberately over-booking them to ensure all seats are filled. United said it had an almost 90 percent reduction of so-called involuntary denied boardings year-over-year since May 1. Paul Hudson ? president of Flyers Rights ? said for ?the Department of Transportation to conclude that United Airlines? conduct did not warrant an enforcement action is a dereliction of duty.? He said the Transportation Department should have held a public hearing after finding United violated government rules. The Transportation Department for months repeatedly refused to disclose the status of its investigation into Dao?s dragging. ?No passenger should be treated like that,? Transportation Elaine Chao told a Senate panel in July. The department did not immediately comment on Wednesday. The government letter said United provided correct compensation for four out of five passengers on the Chicago flight but did not provide required, written oversales notices to Dao or his wife. United Chief Executive Oscar Munoz apologized at a congressional hearing in May for the removal of Dao, with whom the airline reached a settlement for an undisclosed sum. Airlines have said they routinely overbook flights because a small percentage of passengers do not show up. House and Senate bills under consideration include new passenger protections and would ban the practice of bumping boarded airline passengers.
  3. Michael Kellar (L), 56, and Gail Burnworth (R), 50, are pictured in this undated handout photo obtained by Reuters August 8, 2017. San Jose Police Department/Handout via REUTERS Impromptu detective work by a woman on an airline flight resulted in the arrest of another passenger whose text messages about sexually abusing children she photographed and gave to police, federal prosecutors said on Tuesday. Michael Kellar of Tacoma, Washington, will be charged on Tuesday with conspiring to make child pornography, prosecutors said, after he exchanged the explicit messages with a woman he met a year ago on a dating website. He sent the messages to Gail Lynn Burnworth, also of Tacoma, while he was flying from Seattle to San Jose, California, on July 31, according to a criminal complaint. The woman behind Kellar became alarmed as she could see the couple describe sexually abusing two children in Burnworth's care. Burnworth promised to send Kellar pictures of her molesting the children while they slept. "You can do this or are you just saying this???" Kellar replied in one message, apparently unaware the passenger behind him was taking photographs of his phone's screen. "No I think I can do it if I don't have parents over my shoulder," Burnworth responded. "And then on Sunday, I will have the kids no parents just kids." The alarmed passenger, who has not been named, told flight attendants and later shared her photos with police who arrived to meet Kellar at the airport, the complaint said. Kellar gave police his phone and told them he "likely" had a sexual interest in children, according to the complaint, but that the discussion of abusing the children in Burnworth's care was fantasy. Kellar remained in custody on Tuesday and it was not clear whether he had a lawyer. Later that day, police arrested Burnworth, who also acknowledged a sexual interest in prepubescent boys and girls, the complaint said. Burnworth lives in Tacoma, Washington, with a man she referred to in messages as her former husband, along with his three children and the children's mother. She told authorities she had made up to 20 sexual images of the youngest two, a boy and a girl under 12 years old, to send to Kellar. On her phone, police saw the full-text message exchange in which the couple discussed drugging the children in order to rape them while the parents were away. Both Kellar and Burnworth, who appeared in federal court in Tacoma on Monday, are charged with conspiring to produce child pornography, while Kellar, who is due to appear in federal court in San Jose, also faces a charge of attempted enticement of a minor. Burnworth's lawyer, a public defender, did not respond to a request for comment.
  4. A man was knocked unconscious and three others suffered facial fractures and broken ribs after a whale slammed into a charter fishing boat off Australia's north coast, the skipper said Monday. The 30-foot (9-metre) vessel was returning to port in the Whitsundays off the Queensland state coast with eight passengers on board when a humpback whale rammed it from below, sending it airborne. "Within a split second we all hit the floor, the boat launched up into the air and it dislodged everyone off their feet," captain Oliver Galea told AFP of the drama on Saturday. "None of us knew what happened." A 71-year-old South African man was knocked out and tended to by the boat's crew while they alerted emergency services. A helicopter escorted the boat to shore where four men were sent to hospital.hospital. The tourist was treated for a broken nose, while Galea needed eight stitches for a nasty head wound. A third passenger suffered facial fractures and another broken ribs. "We see whales all the time, but it's never (been) known for this sort of thing to happen," Galea said, adding that some of the passengers spotted what they believed to be a humpback in the water after the accident. Each year humpback whales migrate north from the Antarctic to the warmer climate off Australia's coastline to mate and give birth. They can grow up to 16 metres (52 feet) long.off Australia's coastline to mate and give birth. They can grow up to 16 metres (52 feet) long. The ordeal has not deterred any of the passengers, Galea said, who were "all in good spirits" after they got together Sunday to eat their previous day's catch. "The main thing is we all got home, and we have a few battle scars to show," he added.
  5. A Canadian and a Polish passenger jet clipped wings on the ground at a Toronto airport, causing "serious" damage but no casualties, a spokesman for Air Canada confirmed Sunday. The Polish plane, operated by the LOT airline, was on the tarmac at Pearson International Airport late Saturday when it was struck by an Air Canada plane that was taxiing toward a nearby landing gate, Peter Fitzpatrick, a spokesman for the Canadian company, said in an email. The Air Canada craft, a Boeing 767-300, was carrying 286 passengers from Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic. Authorities are investigating the incident. Chris Krepski, a spokesman for the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, told public network CBC that preliminary information indicated that the Air Canada plane had struck the LOT plane as the Polish aircraft was preparing for takeoff. CBC identified the Polish plane as a Boeing 787; its flight to Warsaw was canceled. An Air Canada Airbus A320 was involved in a potentially catastrophic incident last month at San Francisco International Airport in California, when it came perilously close to landing on a taxiway where several planes were lined up for takeoff. Air controllers urgently redirected the plane and it landed normally.
  6. KARACHI: A gas cylinder inside a passenger bus exploded in Karachi on Friday, rescue sources said, which left multiple people injured. The incident took place in Quaidabad area of the megapolis, when the gas cylinder inside a passenger bus exploded with a loud bang, rescue sources said. Multiple injuries were reported in the wake of the blast, they added. The wounded persons were shifted to hospital.
  7. Airbus Friday said it expects the market for large passenger planes to more than double in the next 20 years driven by growth from Asian markets. Raising its previous forecasts for the next two decades, the European aircraft maker also said a slowdown in orders over the past several months did not signal a drop in the market. "The trend is positive," said Airbus chief executive Fabrice Bregier. Airbus last week had warned it expects slow orders this year and perhaps next year, too, but said it was a normal part of the business cycle. The planemaker predicts the need for 35,000 new planes worth $5.3 trillion over the next two decades, an increase from last year's estimates. "Air travel is remarkably resilient to external shocks and doubles every 15 years," said its chief operating officer for customer relations, John Leahy. "Asia Pacific continues to be an engine for growth, with domestic China to become the world's largest market." The numbers released Friday, as the industry gears up for the Paris Air Show later this month, show a six percent increase from last year's forecasts in terms of numbers of aircraft and a two percent increase in value. Airbus last year already raised its 20 year forecasts, which it publishes each year, as does its US rival Boeing. The number of aircraft worldwide that count over 100 seats should reach more than 40,000 while airline traffic will increase by 4.4 percent per year over the time period, according to the Airbus estimates released Friday. This means hundreds of thousands of new jobs, the planemaker said, estimating the need for 530,000 more pilots and 550,000 new maintenance engineers. The planemaker Friday cited more first time flyers and rising disposable income for air travel as other reasons for its forecast. Emerging markets in China and India as well as other parts of Asia and Latin America are growing nearly twice as fast as North America and Western Europe. Airbus is also hoping the expected demand will feed appetite for its superjumbo jet A380 model. "The A380 is the solution for future traffic growth" said Leahy Friday.
  8. KARACHI: The Airport Security Force on Saturday seized 1 kilogram of heroin from a passenger at Karachi airport, sources told Geo News. The passenger was planning to fly to Jeddah. Earlier this week, a bid to smuggle heroin was foiled at the Benazir Bhutto International Airport on Monday when 20 kilogrammes of the contraband was seized from a London-bound flight of the national carrier. The drugs were found by the Pakistan International Airlines' vigilance team concealed in catering galley of PK-785. Around 10 days back, a major drug bust by London authorities came to light, when a large amount of heroin was seized from a PIA plane at Heathrow airport. The authorities detained the crew for a brief period and said the incident is expected to have an ? international element?.
  9. ISLAMABAD: A passenger was detained by authorities at the Benazir Bhutto International Airport on Monday morning for attempting to smuggle foreign currency outside the country. A handout issued by Pakistan Customs stated that ?60,000 ? over Rs7 million ? were recovered from a passenger en route to Dubai. The passenger has not yet been identified. Officials said further interrogation from the suspect is under way. Also read: Smuggling bid foiled at Karachi airport Currency regulations in Pakistan permit passengers to legally take out of the country a maximum of $10,000 or its equivalent in other foreign currencies. In March 2015, model Ayyan Ali ? reportedly linked with former president Asif Ali Zardari ? was arrested at the Islamabad airport by the Airport Security Force for allegedly attempting to smuggle over $500,000 to the United Arab Emirates. She has since been released on bail while a case is under way.
  10. Image courtesy: Reuters video An Aeromexico passenger jet collided with a utility truck on a taxiway of Los Angeles International Airport shortly after landing on Saturday, injuring eight employees who were aboard the truck, but no one on the plane was hurt, authorities said. The cause of the mishap, which damaged the right wing of the Boeing 737 and left the large supply truck overturned on its side, remained under investigation, said Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman Brian Humphrey. Six men and two women aboard the truck were taken to an area hospital for treatment of various unspecified injuries, none of them considered to be life-threatening, Humphreys said. Airport officials said all eight were listed in stable condition. No one among the approximately 150 passengers and crew aboard the plane, Aeromexico Flight 642 from Mexico City, required any medical attention, according to Humphreys. But a statement from the airport said one passenger reported suffering some pain after leaving the aircraft. The accident occurred at about 2:30 PM Pacific time. There was no fuel spill or fire, and the plane was able to finish taxiing to its gate, where the passengers disembarked. Los Angeles International ranks as America's second-busiest airport, with nearly 700,000 takeoffs and landings a year.
  11. KARACHI: The pilot of a Pakistan International Airline’s (PIA) plane who let a Chinese woman into the cockpit during flight has been suspended, the airline’s chief executive officer said in a briefing to a special committee of the Senate on the performance of the PIA. Another pilot, Captain Amir Hashmi, who got into hot water for reportedly sleeping during a flight, has also been suspended. Captain Shahzad Aziz had invited a young Chinese woman during PIA flight PK-853 from Tokyo to Beijing early this month into the cockpit, according to a Geo News correspondent flying on the same plane. PIA pilot endangers lives, invites unauthorised woman into cockpit The woman, who was not authorised into the cabin area, stayed inside the cockpit with the pilot and first officer for over two hours, coming out only after the plane landed. Geo News correspondent Irfan Siddiqui recorded the video of the incident with his mobile phone, after which the news was reported on May 9. PIA authorities also accepted that Captain Shahzad has been a controversial figure, and has cases against him pertaining to sexual harassment and violation of rules. He also has a fake degree case against him. On the occasion, Pakistan Peoples Party leader Sherry Rehman said that PIA is trying to protect Captain Shahzad. The PIA chief executive told the committee presided over by Mushahid Hussain Syed that investigation into the Hashmi incident is under way and the pilot has been served a show cause notice. He said that there are contradictory reports as to how long he slept during the flight.
  12. [embed_video1 url=http://stream.jeem.tv/vod/21a79c9c1da88cd7318131a6218e15b1.mp4/playlist.m3u8?wmsAuthSign=c2VydmVyX3RpbWU9NS8xOC8yMDE3IDQ6MTA6NTYgUE0maGFzaF92YWx1ZT1maGRDY3ZRY2ZJMFlGVHRXaUE4WGR3PT0mdmFsaWRtaW51dGVzPTYwJmlkPTE= style=center] KARACHI: The pilot of a Pakistan International Airline?s (PIA) plane who let a Chinese woman into the cockpit during flight has been suspended, the airline?s chief executive officer said in a briefing to a special committee of the Senate on the performance of the PIA. Another pilot, Captain Amir Hashmi, who got into hot water for reportedly sleeping during a flight, has also been suspended. Captain Shahzad Aziz had invited a young Chinese woman during PIA flight PK-853 from Tokyo to Beijing early this month into the cockpit, according to a Geo News correspondent flying on the same plane. PIA pilot endangers lives, invites unauthorised woman into cockpit The Chinese passenger stayed in cockpit with pilot and first officer for over two hours, coming out only after the plane landed The woman, who was not authorised into the cabin area, stayed inside the cockpit with the pilot and first officer for over two hours, coming out only after the plane landed. Geo News correspondent Irfan Siddiqui recorded the video of the incident with his mobile phone, after which the news was reported on May 9. PIA authorities also accepted that Captain Shahzad has been a controversial figure, and has cases against him pertaining to sexual harassment and violation of rules. He also has a fake degree case against him. On the occasion, Pakistan Peoples Party leader Sherry Rehman said that PIA is trying to protect Captain Shahzad. The PIA chief executive told the committee presided over by Mushahid Hussain Syed that investigation into the Hashmi incident is under way and the pilot has been served a show cause notice. He said that there are contradictory reports as to how long he slept during the flight.
  13. ATHENS: At least four people died and at least five more were injured when a passenger train derailed in northern Greece on Saturday night, railway company TRAINOSE said. Photographs on Greek news websites showed carriages with smashed windows and others on their side near a residential area. The train was heading from Athens to the second biggest city Thessaloniki in northern Greece when it derailed near the town of Adendro, some 37 km (23 miles) away. Its engine was propelled into a nearby house but the cause of the accident was not yet known, a police official said. The driver was in critical condition, TRAINOSE said. The Athens News Agency reported about 100 passengers were on board the train and some media said five carriages had derailed. Twelve fire brigade trucks were deployed to the area, the fire brigade said and a rescue operation was under way.
  14. Delta Air Lines apologised on Thursday to customers, who were forced off its flight last month, and said it would refund them and provide additional compensation. A video was posted online by Brian Schear on Wednesday, claiming that Delta "booted" him off a flight, along with his wife and two infants, due to overbooking. "We are sorry for the unfortunate experience our customers had with Delta," the company said in a statement on Thursday. The flight was departing from Maui to Los Angeles on April 23. This comes nearly a month after United sparked outrage for dragging a passenger by his hands, out of an overbooked flight. However, the airline reached a settlement with the passenger last month. Following the United incident, Southwest Airlines said it would stop overbooking its flights. American Airlines Group also experienced its own public relations fiasco last month when a video went viral, showing an onboard clash over a baby stroller.
  15. KARACHI: Airport Security Force (ASF) personnel late on Saturday seized one-and-a-half kilogram heroin from a passenger at Karachi airport, an ASF spokesman said. The passenger, Ali Sher, wanted to smuggle the stash of heroin to Saudi Arabia, the spokesman said. The suspect wanted to board a Saudi-bound flight of a private airline, but he was caught red-handed at Jinnah International Airport, Karachi. He was handed over to the Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF) for further investigation.
  16. United Airlines set out to repair its image Thursday, reaching an undisclosed settlement with the dragged passenger at the center of a worldwide uproar and promising to refocus on customer service. David Dao, the passenger left bloodied by the April 9 incident captured on video and widely shared on social media, reached an "amicable settlement" with United, his lawyers announced. Under the terms of the deal, the amount of the settlement are to remain confidential. Dao was pulled from his seat and dragged off the full plane by airport security in Chicago to make room for airline crew. The 69-year-old doctor suffered a concussion, and a broken nose and teeth, according to his lawyers. After initial missteps in which the company appeared to at least partially blame Dao, the carrier and CEO Munoz apologized repeatedly and launched the internal review to find out what went wrong. United's chief executive Oscar Munoz promised to refocus on customers, as the company revealed a number of operational changes. "We breached public trust, and it's a serious breach," Munoz told NBC News. The airline will now offer passengers up to $10,000 in compensation to be bumped off overbooked flights, and promised to reduce overbooking in the first place. Those and other changes, which the airline called "substantial," are the result of a two-week internal probe of the April 9 incident, video of which went viral. In an interview Thursday with NBC News, Munoz said the airline will refocus its business by "putting the customer at the center" and avoiding issues in which employees, passengers and law enforcement are placed in "impossible situations." The carrier's report highlighted 10 changes, including the increased financial enticement, which goes into effect Friday to get customers to voluntarily give up their seats on overbooked flights. The crew on Flight 3411 had only offered $1,000, the report said. Modest changes United also has pledged to reduce overbooking -- the practice of selling more tickets than seats on a plane to account for no-shows -- on certain flights "that historically have experienced lower volunteer rates," United spokeswoman Maggie Schmerin told AFP. Such flights include those that are the last of the day and on smaller planes, both of which were factors on Flight 3411. Without enough volunteers to take later flights, airlines are forced to involuntarily "bump" passengers off overbooked planes. "It is our goal to reduce involuntarily denied boarding to as close to zero as possible," Schmerin said. Seth Kaplan, managing partner of the trade publication Airline Weekly, told AFP that the changes announced Thursday will help improve United's image, but he characterized many of them as modest. "Some of this is catching up with competitors," Kaplan said. "I don't think in the aggregate they're going to reduce overbooking dramatically." Dao attorney Thomas Demetrio applauded United's move, calling the changes "passenger friendly." He also praised the airline for settling with his client. "Mr Munoz said he was going to do the right thing, and he has," Demetrio said. "United has taken full responsibility for what happened," he said, "without attempting to blame others." United was not the only airline to modify its practices, as the dragging incident and its aftermath reverberated throughout the industry. The airline already has altered some policies, including no longer relying on law enforcement to deal with customer service issues. In addition, United and American ended the practice of asking passengers already seated on planes to give up their seats. And, Delta Airlines was first to raise to $10,000 the amount it would pay for volunteers to get off overbooked flights.
  17. For any frequent flyer, one of the worst situations is when the flight or your booking gets cancelled when you need it the most. However, United Airlines proved that the above mentioned instances are nothing in front of the nightmare this airlines is capable of giving its passengers. It was only recently that we saw the video where a passenger named David Dao was dragged forcefully by the police officers when he refused to leave his seat. While, the whole world was discussing United Airlines’ rough treatment towards its passengers, a scorpion took the advantage of being away from the limelight and stung one passenger. Maybe, the scorpion was getting jealous of the airlines hogging too much attention. © Twitter Coincidentally, this attack happened the same day when Dao was being removed from a flight in Chicago. The man identified as Richard Bell was travelling from Houston to Calgary when the scorpion fell on his head from an overhead bin while he was having lunch in his business class seat. Was the scorpion denied a seat too? Did he seek refuge in the overhead bin, fearing that he might get dragged to make space for other passengers? Bell’s wife Linda told CNN, “My husband felt something in his hair. He grabbed it out of his hair and it fell onto his dinner table. As he was grabbing it by the tail it stung him.” After Bell shooed it away without realizing what it was, one of the passengers noticed and shouted that it’s a scorpion. © Twitter Bell was attended to almost immediately by the crew members. The United Airlines also reached out to the couple apologizing for this incident and offered compensation. However, having said everything, a scorpion flying with us is the last thing we would ever wish for. Having said that, for once we might miss out on something, but nothing, I repeat, nothing can escape the wary eyes of Twitter and the social media platform did what it’s excellent at - trolling people. So, here are some of the hilarious tweets that will leave you in splits wondering why Twitter didn’t come in our lives earlier. A man was stung by a scorpion on a United Airlines flight, if only there was a doctor onboard....... OH WAIT!! ??‍♂️ — gary walls (@gary_walls) 14 April 2017 #unitedairlines one poor man being stung by a scorpion. The scorpion was forced up there in the luggage hold after losing its seat — filmmaker (@apprenticetrump) 14 April 2017 United Airlines: "Man this week can't get any worse for us." Scorpion: "Hold my beer."#United pic.twitter.com/bEcnGCAsp5 — Calico+ (@CalicoPlus) April 13, 2017 We've all learned a valuable lesson today. If you want someone to move, don't call the cops, just throw a scorpion on them #unitedAIRLINES — Keith Metz-Porozni (@kmetzpor) April 13, 2017 So, United flights are a human free-for-all AND IT'S RAINING SCORPIONS? Someone make a fighting game. https://t.co/iB27YNwUqf — Maximilian Dood (@maximilian_) April 13, 2017 #ImFuriousBecause "no one wants to hear my side of the story" -United Airlines Scorpion #unitedAIRLINES #scorpion pic.twitter.com/G1R2WiIYKg — Eric Percak (@EricPercak) April 14, 2017 Just to be on the safe side, wear a hazmat suit if you are flying with the United Airlines from now on! #UnitedAirlinesAssault #Scorpion pic.twitter.com/iZOAvB13zq — ❄️ Dr. A ❄️ (@AAPsyc) April 15, 2017 Again, if you're unwilling to accept United's generous offer to de-board, policy clearly states... https://t.co/YShuKkHOoW — Andrew Coyne (@acoyne) April 13, 2017
  18. The sight of a passenger being dragged across the floor in an airplane only because the airlines has overbooked a flight is the new form of institutional arrogance. The staff of Kentucky-bound United Express Flight 3411 asked passengers to volunteer to get off the plane because they had overbooked. Despite the $1,000 compensation being offered in return, no one volunteered, which is when the staff picked up 4 people randomly and asked them to get off. While 3 of the passengers got off the plane, the fourth one, a doctor, refused to and told them he had to be home urgently to attend to his patients. © YouTube What followed was a violation of human rights and an exercise in institutional might. The man was violently dragged out of the flight, his cries of refusal ignored as he kept saying, ‘I want to go home, I want to go home.’ He ended up with a bleeding lip, even as other passengers watched in horror. @united @FoxNews @CNN not a good way to treat a Doctor trying to get to work because they overbooked pic.twitter.com/sj9oHk94Ik — Tyler Bridges (@Tyler_Bridges) April 9, 2017 Was it just incidental that the man was Asian? Why didn’t they pick someone else if he didn’t want to go? A doctor who wanted to go home because he had patients to attend to was meted out this merciless treatment, and for what? Because they had to make space for their staff on the plane. @Tyler_Bridges @united @FoxNews @CNN Asian medical doctor rushing home to see patients gets knocked out and dragged out for declining to give up seat to United employees. WTF. — Domo-kun (@domosauce) April 10, 2017 And just when you thought the airline would realise its mistake and apologise, the company’s CEO Oscar Munoz sends his employees an email that makes things even murkier. © Twitter Even if it’s a private airline, it’s working in the public service sector and it can’t treat passengers like their personal property. When we talk about the sense of entitlement people with money or power exercise, it is this too. Organisations with money and power who serve in the public sector cannot use arm-wrestle tactics to get their way with customers.