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ZODIAC

Found 2 results

  1. Cristiano Ronaldo's Juventus have found themselves in a bit of a sticky wicket, as their pursuit for the first title in the New Year is overshadowed by rage, protests and probably the most bizarre human rights violation in the history of football, as Saudi Arabia has banned 'women unaccompanied by men' to enter the football stadiums. As the reigning Serie A and Italian Cup champions Juventus prepare to go against A.C. Milan in tomorrow's Supercoppa Italiana final at King Abdullah Sports City Stadium, in Jeddah, Amnesty International, an NGO which works for the Human Rights all over the world, have requested the both of them to not participate in the contest at all. The request came from the NGO following the assassination of journalist and women's rights activist, Jamal Khashoggi. Le donne alla #SuperCoppaItaliana vanno allo stadio solo se accompagnate dagli uomini. Ma stiamo scherzando? I signori del #calcio vendano pure i diritti delle partite ma non si permettano di barattare i diritti delle donne! — laura boldrini (@lauraboldrini) January 3, 2019 When Serie A made public the information about some seats being available only to men and that women may only be allowed to sit in the 'Family' section of the stadium, it only added fuel to the fire. Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini showed his displeasure by calling the whole act “disgusting” and announced that he will not be watching the game. While no news from either of the teams about shunning the game is out yet, Saudi Arabia's decision to ban single women from stadiums cries for support from big influences like Juventus and A.C. Milan. Players like Ronaldo and Paulo Dybala, who are loved by millions from all around ought to feel a sense of responsibility towards their fans and their human rights. But sadly, Juventus defender Alex Sandro feels that “the Saudis have taken a step forward," allowing at least married women to come and watch the sport. He believes that “they have a different fan base…” and hopes to have a good final. Partial human rights mean no human rights at all.
  2. India is still celebrating a historic win with the annulment of Section 377. On 6th September 2018, the Supreme Court announced that members of the LGBT community shall no longer be looked upon as criminals or treated as second-class citizens in their own country. © siddharthagautam The win had come after years of struggle and activism, some of which went cold after a few years, while newer activists and petitions surfaced to take their place. Over the years, prominent names of LGBT activists such as Laxmi Narayan Tripathi, Harish Iyer et al. have become common knowledge, but there is one name that remained little-known, and that is of Siddharth Gautam, who became the face of India's first collective activism for LGBT rights, powered by AIDS Bhedbhav Virodhi Andolan (ABVA). © siddharthagautam But we know life is not always fair and decides to come at us unbeknownst. In 1992, India lost one of its prominent gay rights heroes at the tender age of 28. Siddharth did not live to see his fight come to fruition or celebrate it with his fellow other members and friends at ABVA. All About Siddharth Gautam Siddharth was a lawyer and a social activist who held degrees from Yale and Cambridge Universities. He was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma when he was a teenager and suffered from this cancer throughout his short life. He eventually had to move to New York for his treatment, where he also completed his further studies. © siddharthagautam As a graduate, he moved back to India and launched himself full force into the arena of social activism. It was during this time around 1989 when Siddharth joined hands with other activists in the country and co-founded India's very first AIDS activism movement, AIDS Bhedbhav Virodhi Andolan, which fought for the human rights of AIDS patients. Face Of The Early LGBT Activism In India Apart from actively fighting for the cause of the rights of AIDS patients, Siddharth was also very vocal about the struggles faced by the LGBT community in India. © siddharthagautam He went on to co-author an influential report titled 'Less Than Gay: A Citizen's Report on the Status of Homosexuality in India' which was published in 1991. A collective effort by six other co-authors besides Siddharth, the report was a one-of-a-kind document that shed light on the condition and life of LGBT people in India and attacked Section 377 of the IPC. © siddharthagautam Siddharth succumbed to Cancer in 1992 and two years later, ABVA took up the legal battle for the repeal of Section 377 and filed the first ever petition against it in the Delhi High Court in 1994. He Believed 'Hum Hon-gay Kaamyaab' In This Fight Even though he didn't live to see his dream get fulfilled with the decriminalisation of gay *** in India, Siddharth always believed India would see the light in the future and the LGBT community shall taste freedom in the years to come. © siddharthagautam In an article in the New York Times, novelist Sandip Roy stated, “I can still see him sitting there near the playing fields of our youth, his shirt sleeves rolled up, his glasses glinting in the moonlight, telling me: “Stay in America for your education and your career if you need to. You don't have to stay away because you are gay. Things will change here. Believe me.” That was Siddharth Gautam, a man way ahead of his time and gone too soon.
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