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Found 15 results

  1. Ed Joyce scored 47 runs in his two innings during Ireland's inaugural Test match against Pakistan. Photo: AFPDual international Ed Joyce on Thursday announced his retirement from all forms of cricket less than a fortnight after realising his dream...
  2. The new leagues 'are competing for time in the schedule with international bilateral cricket'. Photo: AFPNEW DELHI: Asian nations are clamping down on the number of T20 leagues players can compete in as global cricket chiefs struggle to regulate...
  3. Over the years, the world of cricket has witnessed many stars etching their names in the history books on the back of sublimes performances. While the consistency and might of Sir Don Bradman allowed him to become one of the greats, Sachin Tendulkar's fluent stroke-play saw him reach the pinnacle of the sport. Similarly, in the recent years, cricket has seen the rise of Virat Kohli, Steve Smith and Kane Williamson, who have staked their claim as the modern-day greats. Though they continue to win accolades with their ever-surprising batting skills, there is one man who seems to have carved his own niche - the kind that allowed the cricket fraternity to see beyond the obvious. © BCCL AB de Villiers is undoubtedly the pioneer of the concept of what we all have come to know as the '360 player'. As solid as he has been in his technique, De Villiers' innovation and out-of-the-box thinking graced the game and fans with shots that no one thought were possible. While many bowlers plan and strategise in advance to outwit the opposition batsmen, there is literally nothing they can do against the swashbuckling De Villiers. If his reverse-sweep sixes and crazy scoops from outside the off stump sent us all in delirium, De Villiers' freakish athleticism also appears to have set new standards in the fielding department. He can dive, jump, lunge and even pluck the ball out of thin air. Clearly, there's nothing this man can't do on the cricket field. And, that's exactly why ABD has managed to create a massive fanbase across the globe. © BCCL But, on 23rd May, cricket fans all over the world were handed a massive blow after the South African legend announced his retirement from all forms of international cricket. In his official statement, De Villiers said: "I have decided to retire from all international cricket with immediate effect". I've made a big decision today pic.twitter.com/In0jyquPOK — AB de Villiers (@ABdeVilliers17) May 23, 2018 "After 114 Test matches, 228 ODI's and 78 T20 Internationals, it is time for others to take over. I have had my turn, and to be honest, I am tired. This is a tough decision, I have thought long and hard about it and I'd like to retire while still playing decent cricket. After the fantastic series wins against India and Australia, now feels like the right time to step aside," he added. The news of his retirement sent shockwaves across the cricket fraternity as many individuals wished it was a rumour. And, the fact that his Twitter video, where he revealed the big decision, has garnered over 38k likes and 25.9k comments shows what this special cricketer meant to the world. Here's a look at five heartfelt reactions that prove we'll never see another like AB de Villiers: 'Cricket Will Be Poorer Without You' Congratulations @ABdeVilliers17 , the most loved cricketer in the world, on a wonderful career. International cricket will be poorer without you, but you will continue to be celebrated by cricket fans around the world pic.twitter.com/uA7CBlYE9F — Virender Sehwag (@virendersehwag) May 23, 2018 'Mr 360, You'll Be Missed' Like your on-field game, may you have 360-degree success off the field as well. You will definitely be missed, @ABdeVilliers17. My best wishes to you! pic.twitter.com/LWHJWNXcVG — Sachin Tendulkar (@sachin_rt) May 23, 2018 'One Of The Best' One of the best! Wish you all the best ABð amazing player but above all that great guy... ð https://t.co/njEZLnuPit — Mahela Jayawardena (@MahelaJay) May 23, 2018 'Biggest Entertainer In Last Decade' The biggest entertainer in the last decade has bid goodbye to International cricket...your absence will be felt, AB. Cricket will be poorer. Wish you all the best for your future endeavours. Go well @ABdeVilliers17 ðð — Aakash Chopra (@cricketaakash) May 23, 2018 'GREAT GREAT Player' Such a shame for international cricket @ABdeVilliers17 ... But he has been an unbelievable advert to how I would have loved to have played all 3 formats .. GREAT GREAT Player ... Top 3 that I have ever seen .. #AB — Michael Vaughan (@MichaelVaughan) May 23, 2018 'Mr. Popular' The fans gave @ABdeVilliers17 a second home in Bengaluru but all over India there will be disappointment. He is the most popular overseas cricketer to play in India. — Harsha Bhogle (@bhogleharsha) May 23, 2018
  4. AB de Villiers File photoCAPE TOWN: South African AB de Villiers has announced he is retiring from international cricket with immediate effect.The 34-year-old wicketkeeper-batsman made his debut in 2004 against England in a Test match played in...
  5. India bowled South Africa out for 118 in 32.2 overs in the 1st innings of the 2nd One Day International of their ongoing six match series in South Africa. This left them 119 to win. India’s run chase began immediately after a 10 minute interval since South Africa’s innings ended with more than 30 minutes left for the scheduled break. When it was time for the scheduled break, 15 overs of India’s innings had been completed and India were 26 runs away from their target. The Umpires decided to exercise rule 11.4.4 of the 2017 standard ODI playing conditions, and extended play for a maximum of 15 minutes (or a minimum of 4 overs). This rule is as follows: “The umpires may decide to play 15 minutes (a minimum of four overs) extra time at the scheduled interval if requested by either captain if, in the umpires’ opinion, it would bring about a definite result in that session. If the umpires do not believe a result can be achieved no extra time shall be allowed. If it is decided to play such extra time, the whole period shall be played out even though the possibility of finishing the match may have disappeared before the full period has expired.” It took more than 15 minutes to complete the four overs. There is no provision in the rules to start a new over if the 15 extra minutes have already been played. India were 2 runs short of their target after four overs. The umpires duly took the players off for the scheduled break. This decision was universally condemned. It is worth examining the substance of this condemnation because this is an instance in which the umpires were condemned for following the rules correctly and precisely. In other words, those who condemned the umpires were completely wrong, and the umpires were completely right. Essentially, the argument was that even though they followed the rules, the umpires were wrong because their decision defied “common sense”. Further, it was suggested that the rules were archaic, the decision was ridiculous and the situation was a farce. As the players walked away for the break, observers (commentators on television, various journalists on twitter) were darkly predicting that there would be nobody left at the ground when the players returned from their break. On a video show for ESPNCricinfo the former India wicket-keeper Deep Dasgupta even invented a provision in the rules to the effect that if both captains agree, play can continue! Such a provision does not exist in the rules. He was not alone. Dozens of ex-players and journalists were unanimous about how the ridiculousness of the decision and awfulness of the situation. Who exactly was being inconvenienced by the umpires’ decision? The television broadcasters, who got to run innings break programming and the commercials which go with it? The press in the press box, who were served lunch as per the usual custom by the hosts at the ground, and got an extra talking point which they otherwise might have been short of in a one-sided game? The spectators who had come prepared for a leisurely day at the cricket, expecting a 100 overs game which would last until evening? The vendors at the ground who got to serve customers over lunch? Who exactly was inconvenienced by the umpires decision? The decision was perfectly correct according to the rules, and apart from the fact that the game was run correctly, everybody associated with the game did better thanks to the decision compared to what they might have done had the umpires ignored the rules and played extra overs. The one testable prediction in all the outrage, that nobody would be around at the end of the game, turned out to be wrong. As ESPNCricinfo’s live ball-by-ball commentator reported, “My colleague Sid Monga tells me there is still a decent crowd hanging around at the stadium” Rarely has there been such an unanimously held view which was based on no observable external reality. The conventional wisdom in this case was absolutely certain that the decision was “farcical”, “ridiculous”, “stupid”, “unbelievable”. The basis of this certitude is this notion of “common sense”. It was the common sense decision to play the extra over(s) even though the rules did not permit this. It is worth examining the notion of common sense. Laws govern and bring order to our lives. But life would still exist even if there were no laws (or some completely different set of laws). It would not exist in the way it exists today, but it would still exist. Games are different from life. Games are not governed by laws, they are constituted by them. Without the rules of a game, there is no game. Life precedes laws, while laws precede games. Games are completely defined, closed systems. Any move by a participant in a game (be it cricket or chess or football) can be identified unambiguously as being either a legal move (i.e. something permitted in the game) or an illegal move (i.e. something not permitted in the game). The goal of the game is predefined. This means that conditions which have to met so that the goal can be said to have been achieved, are known in advance. Games begin and end. This distinction between games and general life is important because it places a strict limit on the applicability of things which might be applicable to general laws to the laws of games. There is no concept of “natural justice” in a game. Games are structured as a competition - someone is supposed to lose by design. The set of rules which constitute (again, not govern, but constitute) a game is arbitrary. This set does not exist for any reason, other than the fact that it constitutes the game. The laws of games are not supposed to have silences. Whenever events occur whose legal status is truly disputable, the laws of games are amended to end such disputes (for example, the switch hit, or Ajay Jadeja’s exploitation of a loophole in the short run rule when batting with a tailender). Common sense is defined in the Cambridge dictionary as “the basic level of practical knowledge and judgment that we all need to help us live in a reasonable and safe way.” It consists of “common sense consists of knowledge, judgement, and taste which is more or less universal and which is held more or less without reflection or argument.” Webster’s dictionary defines it as “sound and prudent judgment based on a simple perception of the situation or facts.” This is distinct from the idea of conventional wisdom which refers to ideas or explanations which are considered to be true. In games, there is no underlying order which the rules attempt to encode. The idea of the merit or goodness of a rule exists only in the sense that the rule might contradict or be redundant in relation to some already existing rule. In life, the idea of "common sense" is necessary precisely because it refers to some underlying order which can be adopted even without explicitly written instruction or rules. There is no basis for such common agreement about a game. Cricket does not occur in nature. Games themselves are not social or natural phenomena which the rules attempt to explain, they are completely formal entities which rules construct. The common sense view is that the umpires should have relaxed the rules and allowed the extra over to be played. According to those who hold this to be the common sense view, the umpires decision was not just ridiculous adherence to archaic laws which should have been avoided, this was obviously so. Those who hold this common sense view misunderstand the basic idea of what a game is. But even if one were to see the mistaken terms adopted by the adherents of this common sense view, they are wrong. Had the umpires relaxed the rules, they would have explicitly favored India, even if both captains agreed to continue to the game (lets ignore the fact that agreement between captains is irrelevant in the situation at hand). This is something umpires are not supposed to do. The veteran cricket statistician Mohandas Menon observed that “[w]ith only 19 overs bowled, South Africa can still save this ODI match, if it now rains the whole day!” It is not clear if Mr. Menon intended this observation to be in support of the common sense view. But it proves the exact opposite. Objectively, had the umpires ignored the rules and extended play beyond what is permitted in the rules, they would have eliminated this possibility. The remoteness of this possibility is irrelevant. The whole point of having an umpire - an entity which is (a) disinterested in the outcome of a contest, and (b) expert in the rules governing the contest - is to avoid favoring one team or another in any way. An essential point of a game is that while the game is in progress, the contest is technically always on. The fact that one side may be significantly closer to a win compared to the other side, even if this is overwhelmingly the case, is irrelevant. To say that the umpires should have relaxed the rules and allowed the extra over(s) necessary for India to score the 2 runs is identical to saying that they should have stopped after 15 overs (or 16 or 17 or 14), since it was it was clear (or common sense) that India were going to win. Yet, nobody would think that this would be an acceptable common sense decision, would they? Now, one could argue that the ICC should revise the rules and give the umpires some extra discretion. Instead of specifying a maximum of 15 minutes and a minimum of 4 overs, the rule could leave this entirely up to the umpires. But we all know how well observers react to umpires exercising discretion. The reason why the ICC has made the rules so explicit is to protect umpires from being accused of bias or “inconsistent application of rules” when they exercise any discretion which the rules might grant them. The conventional wisdom about the common sense view of the umpire’s decision is wrong. The rules are not archaic. They came into force on September 28, 2017. The rules were applied correctly. There was no reason, none at all, to think that the situational was farcical, except that lots of people who either did not know the rules or did not grasp the implication of what they were suggesting created an echo chamber which said that the situation was farcical. Mockery is wonderful when it is underpinned by some significant truth. In this case, the only truth it revealed was not about the game, but about its pundits. The umpires, as they usually do, got it exactly right.
  6. Pak win Fist Test will Pakistan win all test matches. Yeo or No
  7. View the full article
  8. waqas dar

    Cricket: Latest cricket word

    Latest cricket week with Gary Wilson. England surprisingly don’t lose. Australia unsurprisingly collapse. And the most consistent board in cricket, the WICB, do their petty thing again. Listen here for itunes. Listen here for android. View the full article
  9. Would Botham beat Clinton? Is cricket a strong or weak link sport? Bangladesh. How good is Mehedi Hasan? England, arrogant, idiotic, or idiogant? Is this Australia’s greatest pre-series home implosion since 10/11? And Steve O’Keefe, because we can. View the full article
  10. waqas dar

    Cricket: More Cricket Week talk

    Bangladesh. More death of Test talk. England’s spin. Other cricket things. Go, here, hear. View the full article
  11. A bit on Ashwin. A bit on Phil Hughes and modern fast bowling. A bit on Bangladesh England. You know, the week’s cricket, in your ears. View the full article
  12. waqas dar

    Cricket: Latest Cricket Week

    With Steve Harmison. So get some. View the full article
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