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ZODIAC

Found 11 results

  1. Emails, telephone lines and online payment services were affected by the attack. Photo: FileMIAMI: Authorities in Pensacola, Florida said Monday the city had been hit by a cyberattack, just days after a Saudi officer killed three American sailors at the city's naval base.Emails, telephone lines and online payment services were affected by the attack, the northwestern municipality announced on Facebook.Officials did not say whether there was a link between the cyber and naval base attacks."We're... trying to figure out who this was and... where do we go from here in putting our system back together," mayor Grover Robinson said at a press conference.City officials also notified the FBI, whose Jacksonville office tweeted it was "providing resources to assist" but that no further information was available at the time.The cyberattack comes as Pensacola is still reeling from the naval base shooting.On Friday, Mohammed Alshamrani, a second lieutenant in the Saudi Royal Air Force, opened fire in a classroom at the Pensacola naval base, killing three sailors and wounding eight others before being shot dead by police.The 21-year-old had been on the base for a Saudi military training program.The FBI said Sunday they were investigating with the "presumption" it was an act of terrorism but had yet to make a final determination.
  2. Singaporean authorities say the theft is the city state's biggest data breach to date. Photo: AFP file SINGAPORE: Hackers have stolen health records belonging to 1.5 million Singaporeans, including Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong who was...
  3. Photo: CareemRide-hailing giant Careem on Monday said it faced a data breach in January this year.In a blog posted on its website, the Dubai based transportation network said, ?Careem has identified a cyber incident involving unauthorised access...
  4. Photo: CareemRide-hailing giant Careem on Monday said it faced a data breach in January this year.In a blog posted on its website, the Dubai based transportation network said, ?Careem has identified a cyber incident involving unauthorised access...
  5. PYEONGCHANG: Pyeongchang Olympics organisers were looking into a disruption of non-critical systems on the day of the opening ceremony but could not yet confirm if it was a cyberattack, Games spokesman Sung Baik-you said on Saturday. The Winter Olympics opened with a spectacular ceremony on Friday, attended by several heads of state who witnessed the joint march of North and South Korean athletes, as Games systems played up. The ceremony was also attended by North Korean ceremonial leader Kim Yong Nam and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un?s sister, Kim Yo Jong, as well as US Vice President Mike Pence. Some local media reported system problems, including the Games website and some television sets, were due to a cyberattack but Sung said it was still too early to determine whether hackers had attempted to damage them. ?There were some issues that affected some of our non-critical systems last night for a few hours,? Sung told reporters, without detailing what the issues specifically were. ?We apologise for the inconvenience caused. It has not disrupted any event or had any effect on safety and security for athletes or spectators.? Sung said security experts were currently investigating the incident. ?Experts are watching to ensure and maintain any systems at expected service levels. We are currently investigating the cause of the issue. At this time we cannot confirm (a cyberattack),? he added. ?We are investigating the cause and we will share more information. All competitions are running as planned.? It was also not clear whether failure to deploy drones as part of the programme during the two-hour opening ceremony was in any way related to the system problems. The International Olympic Committee said pre-recorded footage of the drones was used instead. ?Due to impromptu logistical changes it (drone deployment) did not proceed,? the IOC spokesman said with elaborating further. The Winter Games, staged only 80km (50 miles) from the North Korean border, saw the two Koreas, who are technically still at war since a 1953 armistice, march together at the opening ceremony for the first time since 2006. South Korea has been using the Pyeongchang Games to break the ice with the reclusive North, which has been trading nuclear threats with the United States recently.
  6. Several major companies said Tuesday they were targeted in an international cyberattack which started in Russia and Ukraine before spreading to western Europe. Danish sea transport company Maersk, British advertising giant WPP and the French industrial group Saint-Gobain all said they came under attack and put protection protocols in place to avoid data loss. "Most of our IT systems are down across all business units due to a virus. We continue to assess the situation. The safety of our operations are top of our priorities," Concepcion Boo Arias, spokeswoman of Maersk Line, told AFP. A Saint-Gobain spokesperson told AFP that the company also "is the target of a cyberattack. As a security measure we have isolated our computer systems to protect our data". WPP tweeted that "IT systems in several WPP companies have been affected by a suspected cyber attack. We are taking appropriate measures & will update asap". The three groups were the first major businesses to be hit by what is believed to be a ransomware attack of the so-called Petya type, which earlier affected Russia and Ukraine. "This is a bit like a flu epidemic in winter," said Nicolas Duvinage, head of the French military´s digital crime unit. "We will get many of these viral attack waves in coming months," he said.
  7. BEIJING: Russia had nothing to do with a massive global cyberattack, President Vladimir Putin said Monday, criticising the US intelligence community for creating the original software. Hundreds of thousands of computers in more than 150 countries have been hit by the ransomware attack, which has been described as the largest-ever of its kind. It began Friday and struck banks, hospitals and government agencies among a variety of other targets, exploiting known vulnerabilities in older Microsoft computer operating systems. "As for the source of these threats, Microsoft´s leadership stated this directly, they said the source of the virus was the special services of the United States," Putin said. He was referring to a weekend blog post by Microsoft president Brad Smith stating that the US National Security Agency had developed the code being used in the attack. It was leaked as part of a document dump, according to researchers. "A genie let out of a bottle of this kind, especially created by secret services, can then cause damage to its authors and creators," Putin said on the sidelines of an international summit in Beijing. "This completely doesn´t concern Russia." The US has accused Russia in the past of mounting several cyberattacks. In March the Justice Department indicted two officials of Russia´s Federal Security Service and two criminal hackers whom they allegedly hired to steal data from some 500 million Yahoo user accounts. While there was "no significant damage" to Russian institutions such as banks and hospitals, Putin said the incident was "worrisome" and warranted immediate talks "on a serious political level". "There is nothing good in this and calls for concern," he said. "A protection system from these manifestations needs to be worked out."
  8. LONDON: International investigators are hunting for those behind an unprecedented cyber-attack that affected systems in dozens of countries, including at banks, hospitals and government agencies, as security experts sought to contain the fallout. The assault, which began Friday and was being described as the biggest-ever cyber ransom attack, struck state agencies and major companies around the world -- from Russian banks and British hospitals to FedEx and European car factories. "The recent attack is at an unprecedented level and will require a complex international investigation to identify the culprits," said Europol, Europe's police agency. Europol said a special task force at its European Cybercrime Centre was "specially designed to assist in such investigations and will play an important role in supporting the investigation". The attacks used ransomware that apparently exploited a security flaw in Microsoft operating systems, locking users' files unless they pay the attackers a designated sum in the virtual currency Bitcoin. Images appeared on victims' screens demanding payment of $300 (275 euros) in Bitcoin, saying: "Ooops, your files have been encrypted!" Payment is demanded within three days or the price is doubled, and if none is received within seven days the files will be deleted, according to the screen message. But experts and government alike warn against ceding to the hackers' demands. "Paying the ransom does not guarantee the encrypted files will be released," the US Department of Homeland Security's computer emergency response team said. "It only guarantees that the malicious actors receive the victim's money, and in some cases, their banking information." 'Painful' Experts and officials offered differing estimates of the scope of the attacks, but all agreed it was huge. Mikko Hypponen, chief research officer at the Helsinki-based cyber security company F-Secure, told AFP it was the biggest ransomware outbreak in history, saying that 130,000 systems in more than 100 countries had been affected. He said Russia and India were hit particularly hard, largely because Microsoft's Windows XP -- one of the operating systems most at risk -- was still widely used there. French police said there were "more than 75,000 victims" around the globe, but cautioned that the number could increase "significantly". The virus spread quickly because the culprits used a digital code believed to have been developed by the US National Security Agency -- and subsequently leaked as part of a document dump, according to researchers at the Moscow-based computer security firm Kaspersky Lab. Microsoft said the situation was "painful" and that it was taking "all possible actions to protect our customers". It issued guidance for people to protect their systems, while taking the highly unusual step of reissuing security patches first made available in March for Windows XP and other older versions of its operating system. Europe worst hit US software firm Symantec said the majority of organisations affected were in Europe, and the attack was believed to be indiscriminate. The companies and government agencies targeted were diverse. In the United States, package delivery group FedEx said it was "implementing remediation steps as quickly as possible," while French carmaker Renault was forced to stop production at sites in France, Slovenia and Romania. Russia's interior ministry said some of its computers had been hit by a "virus attack" and that efforts were underway to destroy it. The country's banking system was also attacked, although no problems were detected, as was the railway system. Germany's rail operator Deutsche Bahn said its station display panels were affected. Universities in Greece and Italy also were hit. China's network information safety working group sent a warning to universities about the cyber-attack and the National Internet Emergency Center suggested that users update Windows security patches. Shanghai's Fudan University received reports that a large number of school computers were infected with the virus. Accidental 'kill switch' Kaspersky said it was "trying to determine whether it is possible to decrypt data locked in the attack -- with the aim of developing a decryption tool as soon as possible."
  9. Microsoft said on Friday its engineers had added detection and protection against a ransomware attack that had disrupted hospitals in England and infected computers in dozens of other countries around the world. "Today our engineers added detection and protection against new malicious software known as Ransom:Win32.WannaCrypt," a Microsoft spokesman said in a statement. It said the company was working with its customers to provide additional assistance.
  10. PARIS: A huge range of organisations around the world have been affected by the WannaCry ransomware cyberattack, described by the EU´s law enforcement agency as "unprecedented". Here are some of the most prominent victims, from Britain´s National Health Service (NHS) to French carmaker Renault and the Russian interior ministry. NHS The British public health service - the world´s fifth-largest employer, with 1.7 million staff -- was badly hit, with interior minister Amber Rudd saying around 45 facilities were affected. Several were forced to cancel or delay treatment for patients. Pictures on social media showed screens of NHS computers with images demanding payment of $300 (230 pounds, 275 euros) in the virtual currency Bitcoin, saying: "Ooops, your files have been encrypted!" Renault The French automobile giant was hit, forcing it to halt production at sites in France and its factories in Slovenia and Romania as part of measures to stop the spread of the virus. Nissan UK´s unit in Sunderland was hit by the attack, spokeswoman Lucy Banwell said. Russian banks and ministries Russia´s central bank was targeted, along with several government ministries and the railway system. The interior ministry said 1,000 of its computers were hit by a virus. Officials played down the incident, saying the attacks had been contained. Germany railways Germany´s Deutsche Bahn national railway operator was affected, with information screens and ticket machines hit. Travellers tweeted pictures of hijacked departure boards showing the ransom demand instead of train times. But the company insisted that trains were running as normal. Fedex The US package delivery group acknowledged it had been hit by malware and said it was "implementing remediation steps as quickly as possible." Telefonica The Spanish telephone giant said it was attacked but "the infected equipment is under control and being reinstalled," said Chema Alonso, the head of the company´s cyber security unit and a former hacker.
  11. A global cyber attack leveraging hacking tools widely believed by researchers to have been developed by the U.S. National Security Agency hit international shipper FedEx, disrupted Britain's health system and infected computers in nearly 100 countries on Friday. Cyber extortionists tricked victims into opening malicious malware attachments to spam emails that appeared to contain invoices, job offers, security warnings and other legitimate files. The ransomware encrypted data on the computers, demanding payments of $300 to $600 to restore access. Security researchers said they observed some victims paying via the digital currency bitcoin, though they did not know what percent had given in to the extortionists. Researchers with security software maker Avast said they had observed 57,000 infections in 99 countries with Russia, Ukraine, and Taiwan the top targets. The most disruptive attacks were reported in Britain, where hospitals and clinics were forced to turn away patients after losing access to computers. International shipper FedEx Corp said some of its Windows computers were also infected. "We are implementing remediation steps as quickly as possible," it said in a statement. Still, only a small number of U.S.-headquartered organizations were hit because the hackers appear to have begun the campaign by targeting organizations in Europe, said Vikram Thakur, research manager with security software maker Symantec. By the time they turned their attention to the United States, spam filters had identified the new threat and flagged the ransomware-laden emails as malicious, Thakur said. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security said late on Friday that it was aware of reports of the ransomware, was sharing information with domestic and foreign partners and was ready to lend technical support. Telecommunications company Telefonica was among many targets in Spain, though it said the attack was limited to some computers on an internal network and had not affected clients or services. Portugal Telecom and Telefonica Argentina both said they were also targeted. Private security firms identified the ransomware as a new variant of "WannaCry" that had the ability to automatically spread across large networks by exploiting a known bug in Microsoft's Windows operating system. "Once it gets in and starts moving across the infrastructure, there is no way to stop it," said Adam Meyers, a researcher with cyber security firm CrowdStrike. The hackers, who have not come forward to claim responsibility or otherwise been identified, likely made it a "worm," or self-spreading malware, by exploiting a piece of NSA code known as "Eternal Blue" that was released last month by a group known as the Shadow Brokers, researchers with several private cybersecurity firms said. "This is one of the largest global ransomware attacks the cyber community has ever seen," said Rich Barger, director of threat research with Splunk, one of the firms that linked WannaCry to the NSA. The Shadow Brokers released Eternal Blue as part of a trove of hacking tools that they said belonged to the U.S. spy agency. Microsoft on Friday said it was pushing out automatic Windows updates to defend clients from WannaCry. It issued a patch on March 14 to protect them from Eternal Blue. "Today our engineers added detection and protection against new malicious software known as Ransom: Win32.WannaCrypt," Microsoft said in a statement. It said the company was working with its customers to provide additional assistance. The spread of the ransomware capped a week of cyber turmoil in Europe that kicked off a week earlier when hackers posted a huge trove of campaign documents tied to French candidate Emmanuel Macron just 1-1/2 days before a run-off vote in which he was elected as the new president of France. On Wednesday, hackers disputed the websites of several French media companies and aerospace giant Airbus.Also, the hack happened four weeks before a British parliamentary election in which national security and the management of the state-run National Health Service (NHS) are important campaign themes. Authorities in Britain have been braced for possible cyberattacks in the run-up to the vote, as happened during last year's U.S. election and on the eve of this month's presidential vote in France. But those attacks - blamed on Russia, which has repeatedly denied them - followed an entirely different modus operandi involving penetrating the accounts of individuals and political organizations and then releasing hacked material online. On Friday, Russia's interior and emergencies ministries, as well as the country's biggest bank, Sberbank, said they were targeted. The interior ministry said on its website that around 1,000 computers had been infected but it had localized the virus. The emergencies ministry told Russian news agencies it had repelled the cyber attacks while Sberbank said its cyber security systems had prevented viruses from entering its systems. Although cyber extortion cases have been rising for several years, they have to date affected small-to-mid-sized organizations, disrupting services provided by hospitals, police departments, public transportation systems and utilities in the United States and Europe. "Seeing a large telco like Telefonica get hit is going to get everybody worried. Now ransomware is affecting larger companies with more sophisticated security operations," Chris Wysopal, chief technology officer with cyber security firm Veracode, said. The news is also likely to embolden cyber extortionists when selecting targets, Chris Camacho, chief strategy officer with cyber intelligence firm Flashpoint, said. "Now that the cyber criminals know they can hit the big guys, they will start to target big corporations. And some of them may not be well prepared for such attacks," Camacho said. In Spain, some big firms took pre-emptive steps to thwart ransomware attacks following a warning from Spain's National Cryptology Centre of "a massive ransomware attack." Iberdrola and Gas Natural, along with Vodafone's unit in Spain, asked staff to turn off computers or cut off internet access in case they had been compromised, representatives from the firms said. In Spain, the attacks did not disrupt the provision of services or networks operations of the victims, the government said in a statement.
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