Jump to content

Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Welcome to our forums
Welcome to our forums, full of great ideas.
Please register if you'd like to take part of our project.
Urdu Poetry & History
Here you will get lot of urdu poetry and history sections and topics. Like/Comments and share with others.
We have random Poetry and specific Poet Poetry. Simply click at your favorite poet and get all his/her poetry.
Thank you buddy
Thank you for visiting our community.
If you need support you can post a private message to me or click below to create a topic so other people can also help you out.

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'freed'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Help Support
    • Announcement And Help
    • Funday Chatroom
  • Poetry
    • Shair o Shairy
    • Famous Poet
  • Islam - اسلام
    • QURAN O TARJUMA قرآن و ترجمہ
    • AHADEES MUBARIK آحدیث مبارک
    • Ramazan ul Mubarik - رمضان المبارک
    • Deen O Duniya - دین و دنیا
  • Other Forums
    • Quizzes
    • Movies and Stars
    • Chit chat And Greetings
    • Urdu Adab
    • Entertainment
    • Common Rooms
  • Science, Arts & Culture
    • Education, Science & Technology
  • IPS Community Suite
    • IPS Community Suite 4.1
    • IPS Download
    • IPS Community Help/Support And Tutorials

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Categories

  • IPS Community Suite 4.4
    • Applications 4.4
    • Plugin 4.4
    • Themes/Ranks
    • IPS Languages 4.4
  • IPS Community Suite 4.3
    • Applications 4.3
    • Plugins 4.3
    • Themes 4.3
    • Language Packs 4.3
    • IPS Extras 4.3
  • IPS Community Suite 4
    • Applications
    • Plugins
    • Themes
    • Language Packs
    • IPS Extras
  • Books
    • Urdu Novels
    • Islamic
    • General Books
  • XenForo
    • Add-ons
    • Styles
    • Language Packs
    • Miscellaneous XML Files
  • Web Scripts
  • PC Softwares
  • Extras

Categories

  • Islamic
  • Funny Videos
  • Movies
  • Songs
  • Seasons
  • Online Channels

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Facebook ID


FB Page/Group URL


Bigo Live


Website URL


Instagram


Skype


Interests


Location


ZODIAC

Found 26 results

  1. Fifty Shades Freed (2018) Anastasia and Christian get married, but Jack Hyde continues to threaten their relationship.
  2. Journalists celebrate after a news conference near Tham Luang cave complex in the northern province of Chiang Rai, Thailand. Photo: ReutersThe dramatic rescue of a Thai boys soccer team and their coach from a flooded cave complex this week...
  3. An outside view of the Adiala prison in Rawalpindi. ? Geo News FILERAWALPINDI: Dozens of prisoners were released from different jails in the country on Friday under Eid remission announced by President Mamnoon Hussain.Sixty-seven prisoners were...
  4. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un shakes hands with US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Pyongyang, North Korea. Photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) on May 9, 2018. KCNA/via REUTERS WASHINGTON: North Korea released...
  5. Saudi Arabian billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal sits for an interview with Reuters in the office of the suite where he has been detained at the Ritz-Carlton in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia January 27, 2018. ? Reuters FILE RIYADH: Cheering supporters greeted Saudi Arabian billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal when he arrived at his skyscraper offices in Riyadh after his release from detention in an anti-corruption crackdown. But he and other tycoons freed from a luxury hotel in the Saudi capital face a challenge to get back into the swing of running their financial empires in the uncertainty hanging over the business community since their detention in early November. Their ability to do so could impact Saudi Arabia?s attempts to lure investors to big projects, an important part of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman?s grand vision to transform the kingdom and reduce its dependence on oil. ?It will need another six to nine months without disruption or another witch hunt before anyone would be willing to move on anything major,? a regional banker said of the business climate. ?This is not the right time to bring anything to market.? Online footage showed Prince Alwaleed waving from a luxury car in a convoy trailed by police as he arrived this week at the Kingdom Center skyscraper one day after his release, and then walking inside with his private physician. A source familiar with the matter said the prince received an operational update on his global portfolio, which includes stakes in Twitter (TWTR.K), ride-hailing firm Lyft and French hotel operator Accor (ACCP.PA). In the first few days after his detention, the share price of his investment firm Kingdom Holding (4280.SE) plunged 23 percent, erasing $2.2 billion of his personal fortune on paper. After a jump this week, the stock has regained almost all that it lost, but during the prince?s detention the overall stock market rose 10 percent. Kingdom shares do not reflect that gain, indicating investors are still applying a discount to his company because of the uncertainty. Prince Alwaleed?s predicament suggests Saudi tycoons who have long been content to focus on amassing huge profits must now consider whether the government?s anti-corruption drive could stop them in their tracks. Saudi Arabia?s attorney general said on Tuesday that settlement deals had secured just over $100 billion from members of the elite. He did not provide a breakdown, and Reuters could not verify that figure. Back in the driving seat In another video, property mogul Mohammad Aboud al-Amoudi sits in a black office chair at his home in Jeddah receiving kisses on the hand and forehead from a procession of well-wishers who utter thanksgiving for his safe return after nearly three months in the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Riyadh. A company representative reached by phone said Amoudi was in good health. ?It is as if he was traveling and returned, nothing more,? said the person who declined to be named, adding it was not clear if he would run the company again. Associates of other released detainees, including media magnate Waleed al-Ibrahim and retail billionaire Fawaz al-Hokair, told Reuters they were at home catching up with family and close friends. An email to MBC employees seen by Reuters described Ibrahim as ?fit and eager to get back?. It said he would travel to Dubai in a couple of weeks to get ?back in the driving seat.? Hokair, meanwhile, is hosting dinners for guests, according to one attendee. The stock price of his company, fashion retailer Fawaz Abdulaziz Alhokair Co (4240.SE), is still 13 percent below its level just before he was detained. ?It?s as if he was on a business trip or in a summer holiday or a religious trip. He is fully motivated, full of ambitions,? the attendee said. ?He does not talk about anything, he just says he was happy and received good treatment.? These men are among the last group released from the Ritz, which had been used since November as a prison and interrogation center for dozens of senior princes, ministers and businessmen and was cleared out on Tuesday. Specific allegations against the men and the settlements they agreed before their release were kept secret. Some may have been moved to prison after refusing to admit wrongdoing and reach financial settlements; they may stand trial. Notably absent from the final batch of releases were Prince Turki bin Abdullah, the king?s nephew, and dismissed Economy Minister Adel Fakieh. Their fates remain unknown. Two bankers said assets or corporate ownership transfers had not yet been made for the last batch of released detainees and any handovers could be shielded from public view for some time through what one banker described as ?very clever lawyers and accountants.? Critics have described the anti-corruption campaign as a shakedown and power move by the Crown Prince. The government denies this. As workers removed security barriers at the Ritz-Carlton in anticipation of the hotel?s reopening in mid-February, recently checked-out ?guests? reconnected with loved ones. Pictures shared on social media showed Alwaleed visiting an ill nephew in hospital. On Twitter, people urged him to continue his charitable activities.
  6. Nigeria police/ Reuters file KADUNA: Two Americans and two Canadians have been freed after being kidnapped in the northern Nigerian state of Kaduna, a police spokesman said on Saturday. Kidnapping, usually for ransom, is common in parts of Nigeria, though abductors usually target other Nigerians. However, the kidnapping of foreigners is not uncommon. The Americans and Canadians were ambushed by unknown gunmen on Wednesday while traveling from the town of Kafanchan in Kaduna state to the capital, Abuja. Kafanchan is more than three hours? drive northeast of Abuja. Mukhtar Aliyu, a spokesman for Kaduna state police, said they were freed on Friday. ?It was the efforts of the police, through the directive of the inspector general of police, that yielded their release last night,? he said. Aliyu said no ransom was paid. The road connecting Abuja and Kaduna has long been targeted by kidnappers. Two German archaeologists were abducted in the region last February; they were later freed.
  7. Joshua Boyle/File photo MONTREAL: A Canadian man who was held captive by a faction of the Afghan Taliban for five years has been arrested on 15 charges including sexual assault, illegal confinement and issuing death threats, according to reports on Tuesday. Joshua Boyle was freed last October along with his American wife Caitlan Coleman and their three children born in captivity. The identity of the alleged victim was being withheld by a court, according to Boyle´s lawyer Eric Granger. Granger added his client was "presumed innocent" and had never been in any form of legal trouble before. "We look forward to receiving the evidence and defending him against these charges," he said, adding Boyle would appear before a court in Ottawa on Wednesday. Joshua Boyle was freed last October along with his American wife Caitlan Coleman and their three children born in captivity According to news channel CTV, Boyle is facing eight counts of assault, two counts of sexual assault and two counts of unlawful confinement, as well as one each of misleading police to "divert suspicion from himself," uttering a death threat, and administering a noxious substance, Trazodone. In a statement to The Toronto Star and published on the newspaper´s website, Boyle´s wife would not comment on the specific charges "but I can say that ultimately it is the strain and trauma he was forced to endure for so many years and the effects that that had on his mental state that is most culpable for this." She said "with compassion and forgiveness that I... hope help and healing can be found for him." Coleman added that she and the children were healthy. Boyle and Coleman, who have been married since 2011, were kidnapped by the Taliban during what they described as a backpacking trip through war-torn Afghanistan in 2012, and were later transferred to the custody of the Haqqani faction. Boyle says child killed, US wife raped during five-year captivity The rescued family arrived in Canada after five years in Taliban captivity They were freed on October 12 by the Pakistan Army, but refused to board a US military plane. Boyle, a Muslim convert and long-time advocate of freed Guantanamo inmate Omar Khadr, cited fears over his background. Upon his arrival in Toronto two days later Boyle accused his captors of raping his wife and killing his baby daughter, a fourth child -- allegations swiftly refuted by the Taliban. A Taliban spokesman admitted a baby had died but said it was a result of a natural miscarriage. A month later Coleman also spoke of a sexual "assault" by two of her captors in an interview with ABC news. Boyle has been an outspoken advocate for Omar Khadr, a Canadian captured at the age of 15 in 2002 in Afghanistan and held at Guantanamo Bay before being transferred to Canada and later released. He married Khadr´s sister in 2009.
  8. Members of a police special operations unit gather outside a post office, where a man took people hostage, in Kharkiv, Ukraine December 30, 2017. REUTERS KHARKIV: Ukrainian police on Saturday freed the remaining hostages being held in a post office by an man believed to be strapped with explosives, and arrested the hostage taker after an hours-long standoff in the city of Kharkiv. ?All hostages freed in Kharkiv. The assailant was arrested,? President Petro Poroshenko wrote on Twitter, while Interior Minister Arsen Avakov published a picture of the man, with blood streaming down his face, being held by a policeman. None of the hostages were harmed. A Reuters witness saw special force police in green camouflage rushing to the entrance of the post office, a yellow-and-white building at a road junction in the northeastern city near the Russian border. In earlier statements, police said the man had entered the post office wearing a mask and taken 11 people hostage with the intention of robbing the place. Five of the hostages -- three women and two children -- were released early. Regional police chief Oleg Bekh told reporters the man had a history of antisocial behavior and drug-related offences. ?He probably needs the help of a psychiatrist,? Bekh said. ?During the detention, he received minor injuries. He was not in a normal state ... the hostages said he was drinking alcohol.? Police were able to enter the building after one of the hostages opened the door for them, Kharkiv regional prosecutor Yuriy Danylchenko told reporters. Police earlier said they had been in contact with the man via the telephones of the hostages, describing his manner as calm and not making any demands. Anton Gerashchenko, an adviser to Avakov, said employees at the post office and customers had been among the hostages. One of them had managed to call the police from inside the building. ?The patrolmen came to the place of the robbery in a few minutes,? Gerashchenko wrote on Facebook. ?The robber realized that he could not now safely leave the crime scene with the loot and he decided to declare that he was taking everyone hostage.? One of the children released by the hostage taker told local media that the man had put explosives into two bottles and threatened to blow himself up if police did not listen to him. The man also said he had brain cancer, according to the child. The man at one point voiced concern about the recent prisoner exchange between the Ukrainian authorities and pro-Russian separatists and thought more prisoners should have been released, police said. Ukraine and the separatists swapped hundreds of prisoners on Wednesday in the biggest such exchange since the outbreak of a conflict in the eastern Donbass region that has killed more than 10,000 people.
  9. Saudi Arabian Prince Miteb bin Abdullah at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France June 18, 2014. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer/Files DUBAI: Senior Saudi Prince Miteb bin Abdullah ? once seen as a leading contender to the throne ? was freed after reaching an ?acceptable settlement agreement? with authorities paying more than $1 billion, a Saudi official said on Wednesday. Miteb ? who was head of the elite National Guard ? was among dozens of royal family members, ministers, and current and former senior officials who were rounded up in a graft inquiry at least partly aimed at strengthening Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's power. Miteb was released on Tuesday after reaching ?an acceptable settlement agreement?, an official involved in the anti-corruption campaign said, adding that ?the amount of the settlement was not disclosed but it is believed to be more than one billion US dollar equivalent.? ?It is understood that the settlement included admitting corruption involving known cases,? the official said. Officials from Miteb?s office could not immediately be reached for a comment. Royal family members and acquaintances of Miteb had earlier posted messages on social media suggesting that the prince was at his home in Riyadh, but did not say how his release had come about. Saudi authorities announced on November 4 the arrest of at least 11 royal family members, as well as four ministers and dozens of former officials and businessmen in what the government said was a crackdown on corruption. Billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, an international investor, was among those detained. Saudi authorities had been working on striking agreements with some of those in detention, asking them to hand over assets and cash in return for their freedom. In an interview with the New York Times published last week, Prince Mohammed bin Salman was quoted as saying that the vast majority of about 200 businessmen and officials implicated in the crackdown were agreeing to settlements under which they would hand assets over to the government. Apart from Miteb, the Saudi official said that at least three other people allegedly involved in corruption cases have also finalized settlement agreements. He added the Public Prosecutor had also decided to release a number of individuals and to prosecute at least 5 individuals. The official gave no details on their identities. As the Sandhurst-trained preferred son of the late King Abdullah, Miteb was once thought to be a leading contender to the throne. Before he was sacked by a royal decree on November 4, he headed the Saudi National Guard ? an elite internal security force originally based on traditional tribal units and run by his father for five decades. He was also the last remaining member of Abdullah?s Shammar branch of the family to retain a key position at the top of the Saudi power structure after brothers Mishaal and Turki were relieved of their posts as governors in 2015.
  10. Saudi Arabian Prince Miteb bin Abdullah at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France June 18, 2014. REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer/Files DUBAI: Senior Saudi Prince Miteb bin Abdullah ? once seen as a leading contender to the throne ? was freed after reaching an ?acceptable settlement agreement? with authorities paying more than $1 billion, a Saudi official said on Wednesday. Miteb ? who was head of the elite National Guard ? was among dozens of royal family members, ministers, and current and former senior officials who were rounded up in a graft inquiry at least partly aimed at strengthening Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's power. Miteb was released on Tuesday after reaching ?an acceptable settlement agreement?, an official involved in the anti-corruption campaign said, adding that ?the amount of the settlement was not disclosed but it is believed to be more than one billion US dollar equivalent.? ?It is understood that the settlement included admitting corruption involving known cases,? the official said. Officials from Miteb?s office could not immediately be reached for a comment. Royal family members and acquaintances of Miteb had earlier posted messages on social media suggesting that the prince was at his home in Riyadh, but did not say how his release had come about. Saudi authorities announced on November 4 the arrest of at least 11 royal family members, as well as four ministers and dozens of former officials and businessmen in what the government said was a crackdown on corruption. Billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, an international investor, was among those detained. Saudi authorities had been working on striking agreements with some of those in detention, asking them to hand over assets and cash in return for their freedom. In an interview with the New York Times published last week, Prince Mohammed bin Salman was quoted as saying that the vast majority of about 200 businessmen and officials implicated in the crackdown were agreeing to settlements under which they would hand assets over to the government. Apart from Miteb, the Saudi official said that at least three other people allegedly involved in corruption cases have also finalized settlement agreements. He added the Public Prosecutor had also decided to release a number of individuals and to prosecute at least 5 individuals. The official gave no details on their identities. As the Sandhurst-trained preferred son of the late King Abdullah, Miteb was once thought to be a leading contender to the throne. Before he was sacked by a royal decree on November 4, he headed the Saudi National Guard ? an elite internal security force originally based on traditional tribal units and run by his father for five decades. He was also the last remaining member of Abdullah?s Shammar branch of the family to retain a key position at the top of the Saudi power structure after brothers Mishaal and Turki were relieved of their posts as governors in 2015. [embed_video1 url=http://stream.jeem.tv/vod/b3df537b3d3093546245a43cfc8298ed.mp4/playlist.m3u8?wmsAuthSign=c2VydmVyX3RpbWU9MTEvMjkvMjAxNyA1OjU2OjQ1IEFNJmhhc2hfdmFsdWU9aFF6RGs5cHROVk1XWGZpbHZQWDZ2QT09JnZhbGlkbWludXRlcz02MCZpZD0x style=center]
  11. The family was rescued by the Pakistan Army on October 12, 2017. Photo: File NEW YORK: A US mother held hostage by militants for five years has detailed the violence and sexual assault she endured in captivity, and said her young son was also beaten. "This was an intolerable situation for a child to be in," Caitlan Coleman Boyle, 31, told ABC News in a television interview broadcast Monday. Boyle gave birth to three children in captivity. She and her Canadian husband were abducted by militants while travelling through a remote area of Afghanistan ? for reasons that remain unclear ? in 2012. Army describes freeing US-Canadian couple from Taliban Pakistan was told by US intelligence at 4pm on Wednesday that the hostages were on the move The family were released last month in Pakistan in circumstances that are also unclear, and are now trying to rebuild their lives in Canada. Pakistan´s military has said it rescued the family while some US and Canadian officials have reportedly described their release as a "negotiated handover." Boyle said their guards "could be very violent, even sometimes with the children," assaulting their now four-year-old son with a stick, and hitting her and her husband. Freed American hostage Caitlan Coleman rushed to hospital ?My wife has been through hell, and she has to be my first priority right now,? her husband Boyle said "I would get beaten or hit or thrown on the ground," she told ABC News. She broke a cheekbone and three fingers while intervening to protect the children, her husband, Joshua Boyle, 34, told ABC. They made toys out of bottle caps and bits of cardboard, and fearing the family could be beheaded, they made up a game based on England´s Charles I, who was executed in 1649, and Oliver Cromwell, she said. "Obviously with people like this, the idea of a beheading is always on the table, so he certainly knew that this type of thing could happen to his family but then we would come up with games to make it not seem so scary," she said. "He had great fun pretending to be Oliver Cromwell and chasing Charles I around and trying to behead him," she said. "We made it a game so that he wasn´t afraid." After the family returned to Canada last month, Boyle, 34, accused his kidnappers of murdering an infant daughter through a "forced abortion" and of raping his wife. Boyle says child killed, US wife raped during five-year captivity The rescued family arrived in Canada after five years in Taliban captivity "They came into the cell, and they took my husband out forcefully, dragging him out, and one of the guards threw me down on the ground, hitting me and shouting ´I will kill you, I will kill you´" his wife told ABC News. "And that´s when the assault happened. It was with two men. And then there was a third at the door. And afterwards, the animals wouldn´t even give me back my clothes." The Pakistan Army announced on October 12 that the family had been "recovered... from terrorist custody through an intelligence-based operation by Pakistani troops." US intelligence services had been tracking the movement of the hostages and informed their Pakistani partners when they were moved across the Pak-Afghan border into Kurram Agency on October 11, 2017.
  12. BRUSSELS: A Belgian judge has granted conditional release to sacked Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont and four of his ministers, and the group is scheduled to appear at court within 15 days, Belgian prosecutors said on Monday. Puigdemont, who turned himself into Belgian police after Spain issued a European arrest warrant for rebellion and misuse of public funds, is barred from leaving Belgium without a judge?s consent. ?The next step in the proceedings is the appearance of the five defendants before the Chambre du Conseil within the next 15 days,? prosecutors said in a statement.
  13. KARACHI: Pakistani authorities on Monday handed over 68 Indian fishermen to the Indian Border Security Force (BSF) at Wagah border crossing, the Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR) said. Pakistan on Sunday released 68 Indian fishermen held for trespassing into its territorial waters as a goodwill gesture to India. Officials of the Ministry of Interior and Punjab Rangers handed over these fishermen to the BSF at Wagah border crossing, the ISPR said in a statement. The fishermen, on the occasion, thanked the Pakistani government, it added. Indian fishermen chant 'Pakistan zindabad' after being set free Pakistan released 68 Indian fishermen as a goodwill gesture to its neighbour India Out of the 68 fishermen, 66 belonged to the Indian province of Gujrat, while two of them hailed from Uttar Pradesh. Speaking to media on Sunday, the Indian fishermen said that the behaviour of the Pakistani jail officials was very cooperative and they were allowed to carry out religious rituals on Diwali. Indian and Pakistani fishermen are frequently detained for illegal fishing since the Arabian Sea border is not clearly defined and many boats lack the technology to fix their precise location. The fishermen often languish in jail, even after serving their terms, as fulfilling formalities can take a long time due to poor diplomatic ties between the two neighbours. In July, Pakistan released 78 Indian fishermen held for trespassing into its territorial waters.
  14. Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny attends an appeal against his jail for repeatedly violating laws governing the organisation of public meetings and rallies, at Moscow city court in Moscow, Russia, October 6, 2017. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov/Files MOSCOW: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny held a political rally on Sunday, hours after being released from jail and pledged to continue his presidential campaign despite the authorities saying he is ineligible to stand. Navalny ? a fierce critic of President Vladimir Putin ? was detained by police in late September and sentenced to 20 days in jail on charges of repeatedly violating laws by organizing public meeting and rallies. It was the third time he had been jailed this year, part of what he says is a pattern of Kremlin harassment designed to thwart his political ambitions. Russia?s central election commission has declared him ineligible to run for president next year due to a suspended prison sentence, which he says was politically-motivated. Shrugging off that ban, the 41-year-old lawyer held a campaign rally in the provincial town of Astrakhan in southern Russia on Sunday evening, hours after walking free from jail. Navalny said after the rally he would continue to campaign and had the right to take part in next year?s election. ?We have more right to take part in the elections than all the other candidates combined,? Navalny wrote on his website. Putin, 65, has for months declined to say whether he will run for what would be his fourth stint in the Kremlin but is widely expected to do so. Opinion polls suggest he would comfortably win. One candidate who has declared her hand is TV personality Ksenia Sobchak, who said last week she planned to run, offering liberal voters unhappy with Putin?s rule someone to back, though she has little prospect of winning. Some opposition activists fret she is a Kremlin project designed to split the opposition, something she denies. Last month, commenting on rumours that Sobchak would run, Navalny complained she was being used by the Kremlin as a safe lightning conductor for voters? dissatisfaction. But he struck a more conciliatory note on Sunday with TV Rain citing him as saying that everyone, including Sobchak, had the right to take part in the March election.
  15. Caitlan Coleman, the American woman who was rescued along with her family by Pakistani troops after five years in Taliban captivity, had to be rushed to hospital, her husband said. Joshua Boyle, her Canadian husband, told the Associated Press in an email that his wife was admitted to hospital on Monday. His email did not specify why she was taken to the hospital. ?My wife has been through hell, and she has to be my first priority right now,? Boyle wrote. He also said that he and his wife had decided to have children even in captivity because they always wanted to have a big family. ??Hey, let?s make the best of this and at least go home with a larger start on our dream family,? we decided.? Boyle said their three children are now four, two and ?somewhere around six months?. Boyle and his wife were kidnapped while backpacking in Afghanistan in 2012 by the Taliban. They were rescued by Pakistani troops in the northwest of the country, near the Afghan border, last week. Upon their arrival in Canada, Boyle said one of his children had been murdered and his wife had been raped.
  16. Lamonte McIntyre, 41, hugs his mother Rose for the first time as a free man in 23 years. Image Courtesy: Telegraph UK CHICAGO: Surrounded by news cameras and supporters, Lamonte McIntyre hugged his mother Friday for the first time as a free man in 23 years. The 41-year-old Kansas native was wrongly convicted of a double murder and finally set free after spending more than half of his life behind bars. He was serving two life sentences. The group Injustice Watch said McIntyre's first words were, "It's nice outside." McIntyre was originally convicted at the age of 17 on the testimony of witnesses who later recanted. Prosecutors presented no physical evidence or motive to tie him to the 1994 murders. A judge was reconsidering the case in court hearings that were scheduled to last into next week when the new prosecutor in the case said Friday in a news release that new information cast doubt on witness identification of McIntyre as the killer, and that a jury might have not convicted him. "In light of information learned by my office since I began in January," Wyandotte County District Attorney Mark Dupree said, "my office is requesting the Court find that manifest injustice exists." The original investigators of the daytime shooting never issued search warrants nor discovered a link between McIntyre and the victims, according to The Washington Post. He was arrested after less than 20 minutes of interviews. "The investigation was hasty and superficial," said the Midwest Innocence Project, which helped free McIntyre. 'You're free' McIntyre has always maintained his innocence. His mother Rose McIntyre ? who was present when he was arrested decades ago ? on Friday thanked "everybody who never gave up on my son", according to the Kansas City Star, which reported that there were many tears in the courtroom when the man was finally freed. "He (the judge) said, 'You're free.' I almost hit the floor," The Star quoted Rose McIntyre as saying. "I want him to feel the sunlight."
  17. [embed_video1 url=http://stream.jeem.tv/vod/37fe9811f983f4f9b29b21042667fc97.mp4/playlist.m3u8?wmsAuthSign=c2VydmVyX3RpbWU9MTAvMTMvMjAxNyAxMDowMDozNiBBTSZoYXNoX3ZhbHVlPUUrVnROKzNPcjhDVWxHT2N6OXlPcEE9PSZ2YWxpZG1pbnV0ZXM9NjAmaWQ9MQ== style=center] The American-Canadian family that was freed from Taliban captivity by Pakistan Army boarded a flight to Canada on Friday, Geo News reported citing airport sources. American Caitlan Coleman, her Canadian husband Joshua Boyle and their three children left for Canada on Pakistan International Airlines flight PK785 via UK, the sources said. The family, after being released from five-year long captivity, had earlier refused to immediately board a US-bound jet over concerns about the husband?s past links to a former Guantanamo Bay inmate. Caitlan Coleman and Joshua Boyle were kidnapped during a backpacking trip in Afghanistan in 2012, and had three children while in captivity. Pakistan Army rescues Canadian-US family kidnapped by terrorists Trump identified the kidnapped couple as Caitlan Coleman and Joshua Boyle In 2009, Boyle was briefly married to Zaynab Khadr, the sister of Canadian-born Omar Khadr, who spent a decade at Guantanamo. Pakistan Army announced on Thursday the hostages had been "recovered... from terrorist custody through an intelligence-based operation by Pakistani troops." US intelligence services had been tracking the movement of the hostages and informed their Pakistani partners when the hostages were moved across the Pak-Afghan border into Kurram Agency on October 11, 2017.
  18. [embed_video1 url=http://stream.jeem.tv/vod/b984779627c070a439c6b54238bbc354.mp4/playlist.m3u8?wmsAuthSign=c2VydmVyX3RpbWU9MTAvMS8yMDE3IDU6NTY6MDQgUE0maGFzaF92YWx1ZT1HS0MvN0ErUVJidTdvQ2JTdEs2K0FBPT0mdmFsaWRtaW51dGVzPTYwJmlkPTE= style=center] LOS ANGELES: Disgraced American football star O.J. Simpson, whose racially charged 1995 murder trial riveted the nation, was released from jail on parole early Sunday after nine years behind bars for armed robbery. Simpson, 70, left the Lovelock Correctional Center in the western state of Nevada just after midnight local time, prison spokesperson Brooke Keast said. "I don´t know where he was headed," Keast told AFP. Simpson was granted parole at a hearing in July and his earliest release date was set for October 1, but he had widely been expected to be freed no earlier than Monday. Instead, he was set free at eight minutes past midnight (0708 GMT Sunday) "to ensure public safety and avoid a possible incident," Keast said. Simpson plans to relocate to Florida following his release from the medium-security prison where he has been serving his sentence, Malcolm LaVergne, his lawyer, said. But news of his intended move was not warmly received in Florida. According to The Tampa Bay Times, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi sent word that Florida objects to Simpson serving parole there. "Our state should not become a country club for this convicted criminal," she said. Simpson was famously found not guilty in 1995 of the grisly murders of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and a male friend, Ron Goldman, in a case that transfixed the country and became known as the "Trial of the Century." But the former National Football League running back and actor was sent to prison in 2008 for his role in an armed robbery the previous year of two sports memorabilia dealers at a Las Vegas resort. Simpson claimed at his trial that he was just seeking to recover personal items from the dealers, an explanation that satisfied his parole board. At his parole hearing in July Simpson initially did not express any remorse for his actions but eventually offered that he was "sorry that things turned out the way they did." LaVergne told KTNV-TV that Simpson planned to relocate to Florida, play golf and be around his friends and family. "He´s had perfect performance as a prisoner," LaVergne said. "I anticipate he´s going to have perfect performance as a parolee." From the NFL to Hollywood Simpson was convicted in October 2008 of armed robbery, assault, kidnapping and other offences after he and five associates ? two of whom were armed ? ambushed the two sports memorabilia dealers in a casino hotel room. He was sentenced to a minimum of nine years in prison and a maximum of 33 years. Orenthal James "O.J." Simpson shot to fame in the 1970s with the NFL´s Buffalo Bills after winning the prestigious Heisman Trophy ? the award for the best player in American collegiate football ? as a running back at the University of Southern California. He retired from football in 1979 after setting numerous rushing records and went on to become an advertising pitchman and a Hollywood actor ("The Towering Inferno," "The Naked Gun"). In June 1994, Simpson´s 35-year-old ex-wife and Goldman were found stabbed to death outside her Los Angeles home. Simpson was arrested after a low-speed car chase through Los Angeles that was broadcast live by television stations and watched by millions. He was acquitted in October 1995 after a nine-month trial, a verdict that was greeted with disbelief by many Americans. Public views on the African-American athlete´s guilt or innocence divided sharply along racial lines. Simpson was subsequently found liable for the deaths in a 1997 civil suit and was ordered to pay damages totalling $33.5 million to the families of the victims. It´s a sum the family of Ron Goldman are still trying to recover ? and their attorney says he is ready for "round two," CNN reports. "The good news for me is he´s getting out. The bad news for him is I´m in good health. I´m good to go," said David Cook. Simpson has been out of the limelight while behind bars, but the fascination with his story lives on. "O.J.: Made in America," a nearly eight-hour documentary about his murder trial, won the best documentary Oscar in February. And a television mini-series, "The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story" starring Cuba Gooding Jr, won nine Emmy awards.
  19. KARACHI: Police on Thursday recovered an abductee following a shootout with suspected kidnappers in Karachi, which resulted in the killing of two suspects, DIG CIA Dr. Jamil Ahmed said at a press conference. He said the abductee, Masood Feroze, is a resident of Karachi and came from the United States two months ago to celebrate Eid with relatives. The kidnappers abducted him from Dhoraji area of the city on August 23 and demanded Rs150 million in ransom. A police team, headed by SSP Abdullah Ahmed, continued to conduct raids in Karachi and different districts of Sindh for 14 days, he said. The law enforcers faced off suspected kidnappers in Gulshan-e-Hadeed area of the city Thursday morning. In the ensuing exchange of fire, two suspected kidnappers were killed and two others were arrested, the DIG said. Police safely rescued the abducted man and seized two handguns, 12 rounds and cell phones from the suspects, he added. It has been learned that the arrested suspects are residents of Dera Murad Jamali, whom the Sindh and Balochistan police wanted in different cases. Further investigations regarding the suspects are underway.
  20. Mudawi Ibrahim Adam ? a leading Sudanese activist ? gives an interview to AFP at his home in Omdurman, on August 30, 2017, the day after he was released from prison after he was given a presidential pardon. AFP/Ashraf Shazly KHARTOUM: A leading Sudanese activist who was released after a presidential pardon said Wednesday that defending human rights was "not a crime", as he vowed to continue fighting against rights abuses. Mudawi Ibrahim Adam, an engineering professor at the University of Khartoum, told AFP in an interview that it was pressure from global and local human rights groups that finally led to his release Tuesday after months of detention, during which he was put on trial on charges of spying for foreign embassies. "Defending human rights is not a crime," Ibrahim Adam, winner of several international human rights awards, said at his home in Khartoum's twin city of Omdurman. "Human rights are being violated not only by the authorities but also by armed groups, and we have to fight all those who abuse human rights." Ibrahim Adam, 58, was freed after President Omar al-Bashir pardoned him along with five other activists. He was arrested in December as part of a crackdown on opposition leaders and activists in an attempt to crush widespread protests against a government decision to raise fuel prices. Prosecutors accused him of being among activists who were running a "criminal organisation" and engaged in "spying and intelligence activities for foreign embassies". Ibrahim Adam and others were also accused of "publishing lies about (government forces) using chemical weapons" during fighting with rebels in the country's conflict zones. Ibrahim Adam said the prosecution had "no evidence" against him. "They exaggerated things and made them big. The only way for them to back out was a direct intervention from the president," said the activist, who went on hunger strike while in jail. Ibrahim Adam, who has worked extensively on human rights issues in Sudan for three decades, has been arrested several times for his work. The government shut down a development organisation he headed in 2009. 'International pressure' Ibrahim Adam said he was held in several prisons during his nine months in detention, after initially being detained by agents of the country's powerful National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS). He said these types of detentions were reason enough for human rights defenders to continue their fight. The "human rights situation in Sudan will improve if you scrap laws that give the authorities the right to detain people without offering any reason", said a relaxed Ibrahim Adam, dressed in a traditional white robe and cap. "There is an institution that has a right to detain you for up to six months without offering any reason," he said, in reference to NISS. The way forward "is to fight such laws that restrict freedom", the activist said, as dozens of men, women and university students arrived at his three-storey home to greet him after his release. Global rights groups have often accused NISS of detaining human rights workers, opposition politicians and journalists. NISS agents regularly confiscate entire newspaper print runs without giving a reason, particularly when they publish articles opposing government policies. Ibrahim Adam said his release was a result of the "government's own assessment" of his case, as well as pressure from international and local human rights groups. "Officials of almost all foreign embassies used to attend my trial sessions," he said, adding that even the United Nations believed there was no case against him. Ibrahim Adam said it was this international pressure that made Bashir pardon him, not Washington's expected decision on October 12 on whether to permanently lift US sanctions imposed on Sudan since 1997. Some global campaign groups have insisted that Washington retain the sanctions, given Sudan's human rights record. Ibrahim Adam said the human rights situation in Sudan now "was not as bad as in the past", but "more efforts" were still needed. "We have to fight peacefully to change the overall situation," he said. "We have to insist that defending human rights is not a crime, and the government has to protect human rights defenders according to international conventions it has signed."
  21. KARACHI: The suspect accused of murdering Karachi University's dean of Islamic Studies, Professor Dr Shakeel Auj, was freed by an anti-terrorism court (ATC) on Wednesday for lack of evidence. The suspect, Mansoor, was freed after the court stated that the state prosecutor failed to provide sufficient evidence in the case. Others accused of being involved in the murder are absconding. Auj was murdered in September 2014 and nearly four months later, the Karachi Police chief at the time, Ghulam Qadir Thebo, held a press conference on the January 28 and claimed the police had apprehended the murderer of two professors including Prof Shakeel Auj. The alleged shooter, identified as Mohammad Mansoor, was said to be a worker of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement. Shakeel Auj: one murder, two killers On September 18, 2014 the Dean, Faculty of Islamic studies at the Karachi University was gunned down in Karachi near NIPA in Gulshan-e-Iqbal. Nearly four months later, the Karachi Police Chief at... On April 29th three months after the police had apprehended Mansoor, another assistant professor, Dr. Waheed-ur-Rehman was killed in the vicinity of Federal B Area. Two days after the assistant professors murder, on May 2nd, the Al-Qaeda branch in the Indian Sub-Continent (AQIS) released a video claiming responsibility of killing Pakistani and Bangladeshi bloggers including Prof Shakeel Auj ? whose name was on the top of the list. In the nine-minute video, AQIS?s Ameer Asim Umar threatened to execute more people who, according to his beliefs, were involved in committing blasphemy. Shakeel Auj's murder, how he became a target It started in September 2012 when an alleged letter by some KU students surfaced asking about the Fatwa on Prof. Shakeel Auj. The alleged letter mentioned that ?He [Shakeel Auj] makes fun of Hadees and Quranic teachings and also negates them?. The alleged fatwa mentioned in the letter was said to have been issued by Dar-ul-Uloom Karachi. However, the seminary issued a clarification; that the fatwa mentioned in the letter was never issued by their institution adding that they never issued any such statement about Professor Shakeel Auj. Auj was receiving threatening messages and approached the KU administration as well as the police for help. A case was registered and a professor was apprehended, only to be set free later by the courts.
  22. A statement from the Abu Bakr al-Siddiq Battalion, a militia which controls Zintan, a mountainous region south-west of Libya?s capital Tripoli, said Saif al-Islam was released late on Saturday. The most prominent of Gaddafi's sons, Saif al-Islam, 44, was captured in Zintan in November 2011 as he was fleeing to neighbouring Niger after opposition fighters seized Tripoli. Saif al-Islam, the most prominent of Gaddafi?s eight children, was sentenced to death in July 2015 by a court in Tripoli in a mass trial of former Gaddafi government officials, ALJAZEERA reported. He is wanted by the International Criminal Court on charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. The commander of the Abu Bakr al-Siddiq Battalion, Ajmi al-Atiri, was set to release a video statement explaining the details of the release. Since the Gaddafi's four-decade rule ended in 2011, Libya has struggled to establish basic institutions and rule of law, with militias and former fighters challenging the authority of the weak central government.
  23. NEW YORK: Chimpanzees do not deserve the same rights as people, a New York state appeals court unanimously concluded on Thursday, as it refused to order the release of two of the animals to a primate sanctuary. The 5-0 decision by the Appellate Division in Manhattan is the latest defeat for the Nonhuman Rights Project and its lawyer Steven Wise in a long debate over whether caged chimpanzees are actually legal "persons" entitled like humans to bodily liberty. Tommy and Kiko, the chimpanzees in question, are held by private owners in upstate New York. Citing experts like British primatologist Jane Goodall, the Nonhuman Rights Project said chimpanzees and humans share many behavioural, cognitive and social capabilities. It said this entitled chimpanzees to many of the same rights, including against improper detention, and sought "habeas corpus" relief to win freedom for Tommy and Kiko. But the shared capabilities "do not translate to a chimpanzee's capacity or ability, like humans, to bear legal duties, or to be held legally accountable for their actions," Justice Troy Webber wrote for the appeals court. "While petitioner's avowed mission is certainly laudable, the according of any fundamental legal rights to animals, including entitlement to habeas relief, is an issue better suited to the legislative process," Webber wrote. Thursday's decision upheld rulings by state Supreme Court Justice Barbara Jaffe in Manhattan. The Nonhuman Rights Project was not immediately available for comment. Wise previously also tried to win the release of Hercules and Leo, chimpanzees held by the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Tommy's and Kiko's cause drew support from Harvard Law School Professor Laurence Tribe in a friend-of-the-court brief. According to the decision, Tribe suggested that nonhuman animals could face legal duties, citing a "long history, mainly from the medieval and early modern periods, of animals being tried for offenses such as attacking human beings and eating crops." Webber, however, said none of the cited cases were recent or from New York, and that chimpanzees' inability to defend themselves or take sufficient responsibility explains why those that kill or seriously injure humans are not prosecuted. Tribe, in an email, said, "The court's quotation from my amicus brief speaks for itself, as does the court's decision to discount it on the somewhat curious ground that none of the cases I cited came from the modern New York scene."
  24. WANA: Six kidnapped Pakistani workers for a Polish oil and gas company have been freed, a local official said on Monday, more than six months after they were abducted. The six workers for oil and gas survey or Geofizyka Krakow were recovered on Sunday night and have been moved to the main city in Pakistan?s northwestern South Waziristan region, according to Muhammad Tahir, the city?s political administrator. The Polish Embassy referred all queries to the foreign ministry in Warsaw. The Pakistani workers were snatched from their vehicles in November, 80 kilometres from the northwestern city of Dera Ismail Khan. Geofizyka Krakow, which has been in liquidation since August, could not immediately be reached for comment on Monday. In May, its parent company, PGNiG, said every effort was being made to find the workers.
  25. Fort Leavenworth, United States: Chelsea Manning, the transgender army private jailed for one of the largest leaks of classified documents in US history, was released from a maximum-security prison in Kansas Wednesday after seven years behind bars. With little fanfare, Manning, 29, walked out of Fort Leavenworth´s military jail at 2 am to start a new life, after former president Barack Obama commuted her 35-year sentence just days before leaving office. "After another anxious four months of waiting, the day has finally arrived. I am looking forward to so much!" said Manning in a statement released by her legal team. She posted a picture on Twitter of her black-and-white Converse baseball shoes with the caption "First steps of freedom!!" followed by a smiley-face emoticon. "Whatever is ahead of me, is far more important than the past," said Manning, whose original release date was set for 2045. "I´m figuring things out right now -- which is exciting, awkward, fun, and all new for me." Manning twice attempted suicide in jail, the second time in an isolation cell where she had been sent as punishment for the first attempt. Manning was arrested in July 2010 over the release of a huge trove of more than 700,000 classified military and diplomatic documents via WikiLeaks. Lauded as a hero by freedom of speech advocates and as a traitor by others, including President Donald Trump, Manning is expected to head to Maryland, where she lived with an aunt before joining the army as a young man. ´Question marks´ The former military intelligence analyst struggled with gender identity issues while in the service, and eventually began her transition while locked up in the all-male prison in Kansas. "It´s going to be a profound change for her," Evan Greer, a friend of Manning, told AFP. "She has been incarcerated for more than seven years and held in conditions that the United Nations considers to be torture. She´s been through a tremendous amount." "Understandably she has a lot of question marks about what her life is going to be like next, but it´s also her first chance in her adult life that she is really going to be able to define that for herself," Greer said, noting that Manning joined the army at a very young age. "She is a very driven person and I know she intends to continue what she has always done, which is advocating for others and using her voice to try to make the world a better place so I´d expect that we will be hearing from her before too long," said Greer. She said Manning´s exact location would be kept under wraps for her own security and privacy. Maintaining that privacy could prove difficult, however. Now an internationally known figure, both adored and reviled, Manning is even the subject of a planned documentary called "XY Chelsea" to be co-produced by Oscar winner Laura Poitras, who worked with fellow intelligence leaker Edward Snowden. "Chelsea Manning´s story is one of the major events of our time," the film-makers said as they announced the project at the opening of the Cannes film festival, the same day that Manning was released. The documents leaked by Manning ranged from embarrassing diplomatic cables that revealed how US envoys really felt about friends and foes alike, to videos showing a US air strike in Afghanistan in 2009 that left more than 100 civilians dead and footage of a US helicopter attack in Iraq that killed two Reuters journalists. Manning supporters said they feared she would not have survived the long jail sentence. Aside from suicide attempts, she had also been put in solitary for a hunger strike in protest at her treatment as a transgender woman in a men´s prison. "I firmly believe that the fact she is walking out of prison today not only secured her freedom but also very likely saved her life," said Greer. Manning, a native of Oklahoma, had a difficult childhood, seeing her parents divorce and being mocked as effeminate as a young boy named Bradley.
×
×
  • Create New...