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Captain Marvel Movie 2019

IMDb - 6.3/10 Rotten Tomatoes Description: Captain Marvel gets caught in the middle of a galactic war between two alien races. Initial release: March 8, 2019 (USA) Directors: Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck Budget: 152 million USD Music composed by: Pinar Toprak Screenplay: Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck, Nicole Perlman, Geneva Robertson-Dworet, Meg LeFauve, Liz Flahive, Carly Mensch
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Alita - Battle Angel 2019

IMDb: 7.6/10 Genre : Action, Science Fiction, Thriller, Romance Director : Robert Rodriguez Stars : Rosa Salazar, Christoph Waltz, Ed Skrein, Mahershala Ali, Jennifer Connelly LANGUAGE: Hindi (Cleaned) – English Quality: 720p HD-Camrip PLOT: Six strangers find themselves in a maze of deadly mystery rooms, and must use their wits to survive.
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Why Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman's Heroic Saga Struck A Chord With Every Army Kid Like Me

Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman is not my relative. I know nothing about him except his name and his profession. As a matter of fact, I did not even know about his existence as of this past Wednesday. But in a matter of 48 hours, the man has managed to become something much bigger than just another Indian Air Force (IAF) fighter pilot to me. He has become a visual representation of the very hero I would envision as a kid, as I watched my father and my friends' fathers go to battle as Indian Army officers.

Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman's Heroic Saga Struck A Chord With Every Army Kid Like Me© Twitter

Earlier this week, I remember being in a particularly chirpy mood and my Instagram and Whatsapp stories were flooded with praises for the IAF on the day of the air strike on the Jaish-e-Mohammed camp in Pakistan. Oh, what a glorious moment it was. For someone like me, watching our nation's forces go head-to-head with the very evil that has been threatening our nation's security on a daily basis, and most recently snatched over 40 precious lives from us, was nothing short of spectacular.

But like a tight slap on my face that I never saw coming, the next day, my phone blew up with the headlines that an Indian pilot had been 'captured' by Pakistan. And the first thought that popped in my head was not about the pilot, not about Pakistan or what they were doing to him, but it was about his family. The family of Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman.

Look, when you live in the defence world, you find heavy terms like 'war', 'death', 'missing' and phrases like 'so sorry for your loss', 'our prayers are with you' and 'be strong' being peppered everywhere in your surroundings. It could be your own father, a younger brother, or even a classmate; and you just have to be ready for the worst, at all times.

Funny thing is that no one really tells you how to prepare for the worst. There is no course given to us as kids in some secret barrack on 'what to do when your daddy/brother/friend goes to battle and may never come back'. We don't walk around discussing the potentially terrible future of our loved ones. It's a silent fear that we carry in our hearts every day and keep it locked in there, praying it remains a fear...and does not become a reality.

Which is why the second I heard that an Indian pilot has been captured in Pakistan, my mind jumped to the worst possible conclusion. And when those God-awful videos popped up all over Twitter showing 'Abhi' being paraded on the streets, all bloodied and bound, surrounded by a mob clearly baying for his blood...it took everything I had to not breakdown right there on my desk in the middle of work.

There he was, one of our own, almost like a family member, all alone in enemy territory, facing what looked like a gruesome death. But then another video surfaced, where the officer, still bloodied and blindfolded, was calmly addressing his captors. Yes, calmly. Not an ounce of panic in his voice. No high-pitched whimpers of a man who knows he is facing death...but a calm set of simple, straightforward words leaving his mouth. He flatly refused to answer certain questions, while being confident and composed, but still bleeding. 

I was stunned. Not surprised, but stunned to the core. Surely he was trained in what to do in a grave situation like that, but still, the man was displaying something I had never seen in my entire life. Something that I had only heard of from my many friends serving in the Army themselves...it was courage.

Courage is a word we use so liberally in our daily lives. “Come on. Be brave. Down that flaming vodka shot!” Yes, we throw it around loosely without really thinking about the true meaning of the word.

But the Wing Commander took courage to another level by showing his nerves of pure steel and maintaining his wits about himself while in enemy territory. It was nothing but a sheer display of absolute class.

This instantly transported me back to school, when on one particular day, my friend and I were asked to rush to the house of another close friend. Turns out, his father was on life support after being severely wounded in a terrorist attack in Jammu and Kashmir, and he was leaving to see his dad that very day. My friend was visibly shaken. We, the kids, could just look at him and hold his hands while he choked back tears and crushed a Frooti pack in his palm. But what I will never forget is what his mother did that day.

Aunty was sitting on the sofa, surrounded by other officers and their wives, who were consoling her and assuring her that everything was going to be okay. She was wearing white, her face was ashen and her eyes were lowered, but her head wasn't. There were no tears running down her face and she seemed to be giving polite responses to everyone.

I was stunned right to my bones. How was this woman doing that? How was she, after listening to such ghastly news, still looking so unfazed? A 12-year-old me thought it was something almost rude and unnatural, but at 29, today I realise that it was a display of extraordinary courage by a brave woman. Courage to get a grip of one's emotions, especially in situations when any human can simply break down into a helpless puddle.

Which is exactly what Wing Commander Abhinandan displayed while captured in enemy territory. It reminded me of the values and the belief system I was brought up in while my parents were serving. While no one really tells you these things, but somehow, as you grow into an adult, these virtues of pride and honour keep developing within you, and reflect somehow in your daily life, without you even realising it. It's something you will only see if you've lived life as a 'privileged Army brat', as some civilians fondly like to call us.

The officer radiated three things while in captivity – honour, class and bravery, which I reckon should be seen as the ultimate life lessons for every youngster in this country. You will not find a book telling you how to inculcate these traits in your life, but you will just have to experience and embrace it. I miss watching these three traits in constant action around me, now that I have moved to the civil life.

As for Abhi, who has now become the face of the page-turning diplomatic relations between India and Pakistan, I am pretty sure every single person across the nation is by now familiar with his name, his heroics, where he is from and how he returns home today. As the nation proudly welcomes back its son into its arms, I, a tired-old Army kid, has never been more ridiculously proud of my defence background.

We are the lot that, from the outside, appear spoiled and privileged, living the 'good life'; but only we know the cost paid for those comforts. We are those few who truly know what sacrifice and courage mean, and what it takes to live a life of honour, and Wing Commander Abhinandan Varthaman, is our new-age Superman, who will forever be remembered as the man who showed the word the true class of the Indian Armed Forces, even while facing death in enemy territory.

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